Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

1st. Time Butchering 1200 lb. Cow?

Discussion in 'Non-Firearm Weapons' started by VTmtn.man, Mar 15, 2013.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Loc n Load

    Loc n Load Member

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2013
    Messages:
    208
    Location:
    Indiana
    Knives

    Having grown up on a farm and butchered cow, pigs, goats, chickens for 50 years.....you don't need any kind of fancy high end cutlery.....we used and still use carbon steel blades.....Chicago Cutlery types.....I have carbon steel blades that are 70-80 years old and have cut up hundreds of animals.....a good bone saw is in order.....blades that are 4 to 6 inches are plenty big.....I have a heavy cleaver that will cut thru anything you lay down on the block.....I field dress and butcher deer every year also, two of my most used knives is a Russell "Woods walker" & a Buck 110 folder....you won't need some of these knives that I see advertised that you could behead a water buffalo with, just some good steel blades, a whet stone, oil stone.
    Good work table with paper, good meat grinder, wrapping paper, etc.....we butchered every year and my grandmother used everything in the pig except the "oink" and everything in the cow except the "moo".
     
  2. JimStC

    JimStC Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2012
    Messages:
    664
    Location:
    Central Indiana
    A little off topic. Congrats on your pup. I have a 4 yo female, working lines bred, right at 95 lbs. With some basic training you will have a dedicated friend for life.
    As a Schutzhund trainer once said to me, " GS are not the best at anything, but they are the second best at everything". My girl has a switch. When it is off she is quiet and cautious. When it is on she is a formidable opponent.
    Enjoy your pup.

    Jim
     
  3. Elkins45

    Elkins45 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2009
    Messages:
    3,537
    Location:
    Northern KY
    If he's just feeding it to his dog then just randomly chopping it into chunks should be good enough. There's not a lot of butchering expertise needed for that.
     
  4. whetrock

    whetrock Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2011
    Messages:
    397
    Location:
    Tupelo,Oklahoma
    The local "processor" in my neck of the woods, was quite fond of Forschners, for some time, but began the quest for something with a bit more edge retention, I don't think he ever found the knives he was looking for before he retired, but I do know that for the money the Victorinox/Forschner kitchen knives are grand. Also Old Hickories are quite inexpensive, and sport 1095 carbon steel. They still make several useful, old school styles for processing, like the skinning knife, traditional butcher knives (several different sizes , even one with a 14" blade), cleavers, and even a sticker.
     
  5. VTmtn.man

    VTmtn.man Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2012
    Messages:
    79
    Thanks all, the job went off without a hitch. done within an hour... 001.jpg

    008.jpg
     
  6. JimStC

    JimStC Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2012
    Messages:
    664
    Location:
    Central Indiana
    Absolutely awesome. You have a very lucky pup!

    Jim
     
  7. heron

    heron Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2007
    Messages:
    1,062
    Location:
    NE Ohio
    Just looked at the photos . . . now I know what they mean by "a side of beef." Interesting. Guts are a bit revolting, though, lol. :barf:
     
  8. Gordon

    Gordon Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2002
    Messages:
    8,391
    Location:
    central Kali.
    Good job!:)
     
  9. Elkins45

    Elkins45 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2009
    Messages:
    3,537
    Location:
    Northern KY
    So tell us the details. What did you shoot it with and how did you split it?
     
  10. VTmtn.man

    VTmtn.man Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2012
    Messages:
    79
    I used a .410 slug above/between the eyes & split it with a sawsall. With a knife sharp enough to shave with, there's not much to it. Skinning was easy with the cow still warm, Interestingly when I got down to gutting it the heart was still twitching. Another useful tip is to have two pieces of cord & tie off both ends of the intestines everything just kinf of falls out nicely packaged. I have it hanging in the garage it's not getting up much above 40 and the nites are in the 20's so I should be ok for a week or so. Interestingly my GSD isn't going for the beef as fresh as it is, I wonder if this has something to do with her being used to stuff that's had time to cure?
     
  11. joeschmoe

    joeschmoe Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2012
    Messages:
    1,291
    Did she know the cow in question?
     
  12. VTmtn.man

    VTmtn.man Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2012
    Messages:
    79
    No never met the cow, & she was miles away for the butchering. I did save the hide and have is spread out w/ salt & she was very interested in the hide but didn't try to sneak any scraps or anything... My guess is that when I cut & wrap in a wk or so, it might well be a different story.
     
  13. joeschmoe

    joeschmoe Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2012
    Messages:
    1,291
    Try mixing it in with the food she is used to. Any animal needs adjustment to sudden changes in diet. Or maybe she's not very hungry. You could be over feeding. Reduce feedings by 50% or to once a day until her appetite returns. Pure meat is very concentrated nutrition, unlike commercial food that is vegetable and filler. Pound for pound pure meat will have more calories than rice/wheat blends, and take longer to digest.

    Have you tasted it yet?
     
  14. lemaymiami

    lemaymiami Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2010
    Messages:
    1,765
    Location:
    south Florida
    Been on the water almost continuously so just found this thread. Agree with all the recommended blade makers (my own are Forchner or Old Hickory). Wouldn't know anything about animals but have cut a lot of big fish over the years. Did recently see a video of butchering out a family cow on a show about Alaska (Alaska,the Last Frontier) that looked like a very practical routine. Looks like a lot of work even when you're skilled and organized. Interesting topic.
     
  15. Lee D

    Lee D Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    Messages:
    278
    Location:
    sw iowa
    when feeing both, or switching from a kibble diet to raw, its best to feed twice a day...kibble for one meal and the the raw for the second meal. don't feed them together, kibble digests at much slower rate and its best for the dogs health/digestion to avoid combining them in one feeding. I feed my dogs a raw diet (chicken quarters and necks, brown rice, a boiled veggie, a scoop of cottage cheese, either chicken gizzards or beef liver, and a raw egg every other day) and its amazing the differences you'll see in their coat, cleaner teeth and small stools.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page