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200gr RNFP IDP #4 Missouri Bullet OAL question

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by fourrobert13, Oct 30, 2011.

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  1. fourrobert13

    fourrobert13 Member

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    I just order some 200gr RNFP IDP #4 Missouri Bullets to load up in my 1911. Just curious as to what OAL you guys are running with this bullet. I'll be using WST powder if that helps. I've got plenty of data for the powder and bullet weight, but nothing specific for this type of bullet. Everything I have is for JHP and SWC.

    Thanks
     
  2. oldreloader

    oldreloader Member

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    I seat mine to the edge of the crimp groove. I believe that's an OAL of about 1.195
     
  3. bds

    bds Member

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    Update - oldreloader posted while I was typing on my smartphone. +1 for 1.195".

    Because of the flat nose profile, I use shorter 1.195" OAL (right up to the crimp groove) and taper crimp the case same as SWC loads.

    Although 5.0-5.5 gr of W231/HP-38 is my favored powder/charge (same powder/charge for 200 gr SWC), WST is favored by many.
     
  4. fourrobert13

    fourrobert13 Member

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    Well 1.195 sounds good. I was thinking 1.20 from everything I've searched. Thanks guys.
     
  5. Hammerdown77

    Hammerdown77 Member

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    You'll probably end up somewhere between 1.170 and 1.190 (or 1.195). The gun will tell you what it needs to be. Take a factory round and drop it into the chamber of your barrel. Note how it goes "plunk" on the way in, you can spin it with your fingers while it's in the chamber, and how it falls right back out when you turn the barrel up.

    Now, with your reloads, start at 1.190, drop a finished round into your chamber. It should go in and behave just like the factory round. If 1.190 does, you're good to go. If not, adjust OAL down in .005 increments until it does. Also, make sure your crimp is .469" or .470".

    I use this bullet in all my .45s. I think I'm at 1.180", plus a couple thousandths here or there. This works in all my guns.
     
  6. fourrobert13

    fourrobert13 Member

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    Thanks Hammer, I will see what works for my gun.
     
  7. StandingTall

    StandingTall Member

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    I use the exact same bullet for my Colt Commander. Seat a few at the crimp groove and test 'em out. Works great for my pistol.
     
  8. dickttx

    dickttx Member

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    "I seat mine to the edge of the crimp groove. I believe that's an OAL of about 1.195"

    Same here. I tried up to 5.7 of HP38 but the groups opened up the higher I got. Went back to 5.0, still not good. When I decreased OAL from 1.25 to 1.195 things really tightened up.
     
  9. noylj

    noylj Member

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    1) drop a bullet in the chamber. Measure the distance from muzzle to bullet nose while bullet is lightly pressed into barrel lede/lead/rifling.
    2) measure distance from muzzle to breech.
    3) Subtract bullet distance from breech distance to get max COL
    4) Load a dummy inert round (no powder or primer) with bullet to max COL.
    5) Does dummy round fit in magazine? IF not, seat deeper until it does fit
    6) Does dummy round chamber easily? If not, blacken the bullet ogive and case with Magic Marker or Sharpee.
    Drop in barrel, rotate case back-and-forth a couple of time.
    If scratches are on bullet, Seat deeper until there are no scratches on bullet. If scratches are on case by mouth, you need to remove more of the case mouth flare/belling.
    Once you have the round chambering correctly, reassemble gun, place inert dummy round in magazine, insert magazine, pull slide all the back and release. If the round chambers, you have your COL for your barrel and your bullet.
    All barrels are at least somewhat different in dimensions and my COL may not be ideal in your gun(s).
    However, one thing I have noticed, most bullets are set at a "good" COL when the round simply looks right.
    Also, most 1911s are chambered to allow rather long COLs.
    I have attached an image of a 9x19 round with a 115gn L-SWC to show the type of COL that is best for most 1911s.
     

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