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22-250 or .270?

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by wdallis, Nov 30, 2011.

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  1. wdallis

    wdallis Member

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    I own a savage 110 .270 with wood stock. I am thinking about trading it for a 22-250. Wanting to know what the value of my gun is and if I would be gaining any thing from it. The gun will be used to hunt deer and varmints?
     
  2. conrad427

    conrad427 Member

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    seems like the boys like .22's for deer hunting in Texas. Dont know if the deer hunting is similar in your area or not. If you have one rifle and mostly hunt deer i would stick with the .270. However, i would go with the .22 if i rarely hunt deer but shoot varmints all year. I am not up on deer loadings for the .22 but good bullets are around for the handloader. not sure which modle 110 you have but a look in the gun traders guide would put it in the 250 to 350 range used.
     
  3. LoonWulf

    LoonWulf Member

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    .22-250 is on the lite side for deer. If you want to downgrade I'd go to the .243. You'll still have.the ability to shoot lite varmint bullets if you want. As for value on an older 110? 250 for the gun probably isn't unreasonable...if you've got a decent scope that adds some value.
     
  4. morcey2

    morcey2 Member

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    My personal opinion is that 22-250 is too small for deer. I know a lot of people use it and 223, but there just isn't enough energy there. I know some will disagree with me, but I wish Utah would make 243/6mm the minimum size for deer here. I'd keep the 270.

    Matt
     
  5. wdallis

    wdallis Member

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    I need something that will get out to 300 yards. I am new to varmint hunting, so I mostly deer hunt during season, but I have a feeling once I get into varmint hunting, I will do it year round.
     
  6. MistWolf

    MistWolf Member

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    Then I would not trade away the 270. I would buy another rifle in 22-250, which is a great caliber! (Maybe a 223 instead, mostly because I like my ARs so much)
     
  7. 10-96

    10-96 Member

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    Oh yeah- varmint hunting is very addictive! Have you checked local options for a .243? For both applications they shine like a diamond in a billygoats hiney. Whether you reload or not, you can get 55 or 58gr varmint loads that are good to at least 440yds. Then for deer, you can go with 100gr loads that do right well.
     
  8. 303tom

    303tom member

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    I would stay with the .270 Win................
     
  9. USAF_Vet

    USAF_Vet Member

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    +1 on keeping the .270. You won't gain much and honestly might be losing a little if you were to trade to a 22-250. .270 is more than adequate for deer, and while it might be a bit overkill on some varmints, it's still a good round for coyote and coons. Not sure what other common varmints are in your neck of OK, but I'd be keeping that .270.

    If you're set on getting rid of it, dropping to a .243 or a .223 will get you the most bang for your buck.
     
  10. pikid89

    pikid89 Member

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    just like the 223, the 22-250 is perfect for varmints, and will work for deer if you do your part, no problem

    the 270 is hands down amongst the greatest deer calibers of all time, and can be loaded with 90 grain hollow points for varmints, but that is quite excessive

    the .243 is a great cartridge for deer, and great for varmints like coyotes, but if your target is prairie dogs, its a bit of a waste

    its all about compromises...

    were it me, I would hang onto the .270 and and since you have a Savage, you could just get a 22-250 barrel since they use the same bolt face
     
  11. AMG04

    AMG04 Member

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    + 1 on MistWolf's comment

    My grandfather has encouraged me to keep all the guns I've purchased. He has many horror stories of selling guns when he was low on cash just to go back out and buy them. :banghead: I would keep the .270 (great caliber) then look into buying a new .22 cal. A 223/5.56 is a great option for plinking/small game hunting.

    As of this year Marlin is offering the "Model X7VH" in .22-250. I believe they are less than or at about $300.00. The only downside to this rifle is it has a 1/14 twist which means it will only shoot the lighter .22 cal bullets (not exactly great for deer). 1/8 or 1/9 are good for stablilizing the heavy .22 cal bullets like the 75 gr A-max which IMHO are just fine on hogs and deer.

    I will confirm Conrad427's post ;) (I am a Texas boy). I have shot small deer and hogs with my AR using handloads. I have never had one take a step, all were DRT. Shot placement is critical and keeping shots < 150 yards helps. As for larger deer or sheep I reach for the .25-06 or .260 Rem (again thats why I advise you keep the .270).

    My 25-06 is a Marlin XL7 with a Leupold 3x9x50, it shoots sub MOA at 100 yards with handloads. Rifle + Optic was about $500.

    Good value in my opinion.

    Best of luck to you!
     
  12. Art Eatman

    Art Eatman Administrator Staff Member

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    Another vote for keeping the .270. Sure, a .22-250 will kill deer, but I figure that the .270 is likely more reliable on a day-in, day-out basis.

    I like the .22-250 and the .220 Swift for prairie dogs and other varmints, but I've found that my .223 works quite well on prairie dogs to 300 yards. (Haven't bothered to try for farther out.)

    pikid89's idea about barrel-swapping seems quite sensible.
     
  13. BrocLuno

    BrocLuno Member

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    I agree on the 243. I have 22-250 and would not use it for deer unless I had to cause one was in the veggie garden and that's all I had.
     
  14. Cob

    Cob Member

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    Keep the .270. - Only way i might consider a trade, is: I would trade a beat up ole Savage for a nicer grade Winchester or Browning if it was in perfect condition. Then i would go and trade the Perfect Condition Browning or Winchester in 22-250 back for another .270 in a condition that was better than i started out with., (and the gun stor owner would probably ask a higher value for the .270 you wanted than the 22-250 you had to trade.)

    The .270 is versatile and my favorite all around caliber. (As Pkid stated) Shoot 90-100 grain bullets for varmints, upgrade to 130-140 grain bullets for Deer sized game, and 150 grain bullets for Bear/ Elk.
     
  15. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    The .270 is just getting it's second wind at 300 yards.

    With a 100 grain PSP varmint bullet sighted in 2" high at 100 yards.
    0 = 235 yards.
    5" low at 300 yards.
    18" low at 400 yards.

    That is so close to the same trajectory as the 22-250 as to go unnoticed.

    Don't fix something that isn't broke.

    rc
     
  16. gathert

    gathert Member

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    I would stick with the .270. It kicks like a mule but will put anything down it comes in contact with. The .22-250 is only good for deer inside of about 100 yards with a well placed shot and while it a good all-purpose gun for smaller stuff, the .270 can do everything the .22-250 can, just bigger and at longer ranges.
     
  17. Cob

    Cob Member

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    http://www.hornady.com/assets/files/ballistics/english-ballistics-chart-2010.pdf

    Check out the ballistics table from Hornandy in the above link, & compare the .270 for the 22-250 for yourself for those 300+ yard shots.

    The very best bullet offered in 22-250 is traveling 2003 FPS/ with 445 ft/lbs of energy at 500 yards, compared to the best bullet in .270 traveling at 2213 FPS/ with 1414 ft/lbs of energy. The amount of energy the .270 has at 500 yards is almost equal to the average energy at the end of the barrel of the 22-250.
    The .270 is superior at long range in both energy and velocity, carrying a bullet 210 FPS faster, with over 3.5 times the energy than the 22-250.
    For hunting, i suspect i have to agree with Jack O'Connor. The .270 is hard to beat.

    If you decide to trade, make sure you get at least an extra $100.00 out of the deal.
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2011
  18. Eb1

    Eb1 Member

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    Sounds like some of you guys have never see the holes a .22-250 puts in a deer. I have seen fist size holes on both sides from a .22-250 using Spire Point jacketed 55 grain ammo.

    Never say a caliber is to light. You just have to hit them in the right spot.
     
  19. Maple_City_Woodsman

    Maple_City_Woodsman Member

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    30 years ago, you would be in the right.

    Today however, 60gr Nosler + Deer head = exploded... As in, eyeballs poped out of their sockets from the force of expansion. A level of gore that most would consider absurd or cartoonish.

    That is through thick bone; the bullet reaches deeper before doing the same in tissue. That equals exploded heart or lungs.

    "Energy" is a non issue. ANY center fire rifle has more energy than any of the handguns that are commonly used to take deer cleanly and effectively, so "energy" exists in spades. The issue is bullet construction.

    Can the 22 rifle bullet in question do what it needs to do at the proper depth of penetration to be effective? 30 years ago the answer was no. Today, the answer for many of them is yes.
     
  20. pikid89

    pikid89 Member

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    don't know what .270 you've been shooting, but besides its great versatility, another thing the .270 Winchester is known for is its mild recoil

    I shoot a pretty light weight .270, a Ruger Zytel stock, a stock not known for great recoil mitigation, and while its not a 22 or a 223, its not a bad kick at all
     
  21. kludge

    kludge Member

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    It's a Savage.

    Buy an action wrench, a barrel nut wrench, "go" and "no go" gauges, and a .22-250 barrel.

    When you hunt deer, put on the .270 barrel, when you want to shoot varmints screw on the .22-250 barrel.

    http://www.mcgowenbarrel.com/
     
  22. kludge

    kludge Member

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  23. AABEN

    AABEN Member

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    Most 22.250 only have a 1-14 twist that is only good up to 60 grains you will need a good 80 to 100 Gran bullet. I like the 243 and a 25.06 your 270 is a verry good gun you can load from 90gr to 160gr. I would keep it before I would trade for a 22.250
     
  24. JohnM

    JohnM Member

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    22-250 isn't even legal for big game here.
     
  25. mljdeckard

    mljdeckard Member

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    I agree. the .270 can at least come close to what the .22-250 can do. The .270 can do things the 22-250 cannot do. The main advantage of the 22-250 is scorching velocity. Find or load some .270 with 100 gr bullets, it will make a hole in your coyote hides .05" bigger than a 22-250. You can hunt coyotes with a .270. You can't hunt elk with a 22-250.

    While i am glad that I happen to have both, I recently listened to a podcast from a professional coyote guide, and he was giving advice to people who wanted to get started. He said; "You don't have to have a specific varmint rifle to get started here. Take whatever you use to hunt deer, load it with light bullets, it will work just fine."
     
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