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.22 Cal Springer Ammo and Small Game

Discussion in 'Air Guns' started by rodwha, Feb 10, 2020.

  1. vincyr

    vincyr Member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2013
    Messages:
    197
    Location:
    Upstate NY
    Accuracy trump's power when it comes to coons. They are tough, but a 14gr .22 pellet at 720 fps between the eyes does the job. I've used my Benjamin Prowler to dispatch the occasional chicken killer, and it works great as long as you do your part. Great squirrel gun too.
     
  2. Septicdeath

    Septicdeath Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2020
    Messages:
    38
    So accuracy and power is best. It should only take one shot.
     
  3. fpgt72

    fpgt72 Member

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    Aug 2, 2011
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    2,361
    Multi stroke pneumatic......Think your old BB gun from when you are a kid....in a nutshell the more pumps the more power.

    There is still a place for guns like this....and good guns. They are great for pesting in and around buildings where you don't need the power to take down something like a starling....and you don't want to damage the building or equipment near by.
     
  4. fpgt72

    fpgt72 Member

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    Go to straight shooters dot com.....they have a pellet sample pack and it has like 50 of the most popular pellets in a package....you can try in your gun before you buy entire tins of stuff your gun may not like.
     
    rodinal220 and rodwha like this.
  5. fpgt72

    fpgt72 Member

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    With a spring gun even a gas spring it will take a bit for the gun to "settle in".....I would run about a tin through it before you start to worry about just where the holes are going.....so for starters I would pick an inexpensive LEAD pellet.

    Then do like I suggested get that sample pack....it has enough of each type of pellet to see just what your gun will like.

    Lastly if you are going to be shooting a "magnum" spring gun get ready for a VERY STEEP learning curve....shooting a high powered spring gun is not like shooting ANYTHING else on the planet....very different skill set....and a skill set that not everyone can master.

    You need to learn the hold, the same....SAME hole each and every shot, let the gun jump and move around....they are in a word hard to shoot. Personally I would not suggest a gun like this to anyone that is new to air guns...it will flat turn them off of airguns all the way around at worst and at best spring guns in general.

    I will not go down the "cheap chinese" road as I look at my chinese monitor, type on my chinese keyboard and use my chinese mouse to close the thread. The chinese will build anything you want to any quality you want to pay for....hard for some people to understand.
     
  6. Septicdeath

    Septicdeath Member

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    Jan 12, 2020
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    38
    Learn and use the military hold. I shoot Magnums all the time. Hold you rifle loose like your cradling it. Loose on the shoulder just lay the for grip in your palm resting your elbow on your knee. Pull the trigger in a smooth motion. Hold your position until the firing cycle is completed. It takes a millisecond for this to happen. If you move you will miss your mark. Most times after you get used to shooting this way you know as soon as you pull the trigger if you missed. Most my missed shots come from slight movements on my part during the firing cycle.
     
  7. Septicdeath

    Septicdeath Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2020
    Messages:
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    Fighting Stance – the best way to describe this position is to say that you step into it. Your left foot (assuming you’re right-handed) is out in front by a stride and slightly to the left of your right foot (i.e. your right foot isn’t directly behind your left foot). Lean into your leading foot a little. Your feet should be no more than shoulder-width together and don’t lock your knees! Allow your elbows to point out at a slight angle. Don’t hang around, the key to consistent, accurate shooting from a standing position is to get into that position quickly and fire.
    , First Target Position – with this popular stance, your feet will be side-on to the target (so you’re facing 90 degrees away from it) with your hip leaning slightly towards it. This will cause your skeleton to take most of the load, rather than your muscles. Your left arm is doing all the work here really but that still shouldn’t be much as it’s just taking the weight of your rifle. The rifle should ideally be resting on your left hand, which is flat. Your right hand is only used for pulling the trigger.
    Classic Sitting Position – sit, if possible, with your backside raised a little. Either on a smooth rock or a bag. You don’t have to but I find it does make it a little easier to shoot if you do this. Use your feet to stabilize yourself, weight on your heels, knees bent, making a nice 45-degree angle from the floor.
    Half-Kneeling – another very popular position is when your right knee is kneeling but your left foot is planted in the ground ahead of you. Your left elbow rests on your left leg and your backside is sitting on the heel of your right foot. This can be a bit uncomfortable for some so you may want to consider putting a jumper between your backside and your heel to make things a bit comfier for you.
     
    rodwha likes this.
  8. readyeddy

    readyeddy Member

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    May 8, 2012
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    1,534
    Try one of the $100 crosman 22 break barrels. Look for something rated around 1000 FPS with alloy pellets just because they only advertise alloy speeds. Use 14 grain lead pellets and you should get an ideal 800 FPS for pests.

    I shoot the Optimus but the other models are probably just as good.

    But if you’re the type that wants perfect triggers and high quality then get a $400 or more German made rifle and be done with it.
     
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