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22 Short the oldest cartridge still in production (including niche manufacturers)??

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by saturno_v, Jan 15, 2009.

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  1. saturno_v

    saturno_v Member

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    I did look at the date of introduction of some old cartridges still in regular commercial offering (22 Long Rifle, 44-40 Winchester, 45 Colt, 45-70, etc..) and it seems to me that the venerable 22 Short is the absolute oldest of the bunch (introduced in 1857)......is that correct??

    There is some small obscure manufacturer that sell an even older round including on special order only???

    The 22 Long Rifle instead appear to be the oldest still produced in the highest number (for that matter the 22 LR is the king of volume production regardless of age)

    Regards!!
     
  2. Moonclip

    Moonclip Member

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    I'd say you are correct. I like the .22short and have firearms chambered for it.
     
  3. Tommygunn

    Tommygunn Member

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    IIRC the 22 short we know is actually more powerful than the round that was introduced back in the mid minteenth century.
     
  4. SaMx

    SaMx Member

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    Wasn't the .22 short invented by taking a musket cap, and putting a little powder and a bullet in it? Or is that totally wrong? I remember reading something like that.
     
  5. Rubber_Duck

    Rubber_Duck Member

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    I like the 22 Short. I can fit around 20-21 in my Henry lever-action. :)
     
  6. Owen Sparks

    Owen Sparks member

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    If you measure a musket cap you will find the diameter is just about the same as brass case of a .22 short. Also, some even shorter versions have been made called CB and BB caps. These contained no powder at all and used only the priming mixture to propel the little bullet. I have part of a tin of German made CB caps. They have a pointed bullet that looks like an air gun pellet and the brass case is only about a quarter of an inch long. Out of a long barrel they are about as quiet (and powerful) as a typical air rifle. They are suitable for basement plinking with a proper backstop.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.22_CB Here is what Wikipedia has to say, The short on on the left looks just like the ones I have.
     
  7. Onmilo

    Onmilo Member

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    The information I have indicates BB was the abbreviation for breeched ball as in a round ball loaded through the breech instead of the muzzle and CB stands for conical bullet.

    Paper cartridges as utilized by Sharps rifles and carbines and specialty brass cases used by early breechloaders such as the Gallagher and the Burnside are still offered through some specialty dealers but the .22 short rimfire remains the oldest self contained cartridge in continuous production.
     
  8. rabidgoldfish

    rabidgoldfish Member

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    He he,

    "developed for self defense" to that I say [citation needed]
     
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