223 Full Length Resizing

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Hondo 60, Jan 2, 2014.

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  1. TheCracker

    TheCracker Member

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    I remember reading guys saying that they had luck neck sizing for semi autos with their OFB. I think it's asking for reliability trouble even if it does work some times. Eventually even bolt gun brass has to be fl sized when it gets too stiff. Then you would have the whole chamber getting dirty with a lot of shooting.
     
  2. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator Staff Member

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    It's no fun getting a locked up AR open. We read about it here from time to time. The usual suggestion is to beat the stock on the ground. (Hopefully while pointed in a safe direction) Yikes, I don't want to do that with my gun.
     
  3. Trent

    Trent Member

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    There's certain modes of failure in the AR15 that make me cringe, and a stuck cartridge/locked bolt is top on that list.

    I had a friend at the range get a stuck cartridge in his chamber once. He brought me his rifle and I said "dude, does this have a loaded cartridge currently in the chamber?"

    "I don't know."

    {FACEPALM}

    Greeeeeeat. He had been firing lacquered steel case for god knows how long, and switched to brass without cleaning. Lacquer residue glued his first brass round solidly in place. Bolt wouldn't budge. Period.

    I had a rubber mallet in my range bag, and told him "If I bust your charging handle, I'm sorry."

    It took about 50 moderately strong whacks before the vibration and shock finally got things moving. Didn't break anything in the process, fortunately. (Was afraid of bending / breaking the charging handle; did that once before.)

    So, neck size if you want! But be prepared to bust parts getting it opened up if it don't work out.
     
  4. cfullgraf

    cfullgraf Member

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    I think it is NIH syndrome, otherwise known as Not Invented Here syndrome.
     
  5. Trent

    Trent Member

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    I tell you one thing. It only takes ONCE to learn a hard lesson.

    If the brass grows to the point the shoulder to case head index binds the bolt face in an AR15, it'll be a lesson that's not soon forgotten.

    Once the locking lugs are engaged, if that case expands enough, it can be hell getting the bolt to twist and come out. There's no "easy way" to make it happen.

    Also, forcing the bolt to close on an over-long round with the forward assist, should give some indication that something is about to go very wrong. But even so, some people ignore the warning and do it anyway.. Once fired that casing will be nigh-impossible to get out without risk of breaking or shearing SOME piece of aluminum, SOMEWHERE.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 5, 2014
  6. jpwilly

    jpwilly Member

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    Since this subject has been covered so well. Let me add one more tip that might also help. Be sure you have your Full Length Die set up properly to actually do it's job. I made the mistake of making 100 rounds set up incorrectly and still jammed my rifle with two rounds that were just too tight to chamber. I've since adjusted the die and fixed the issue.
     
  7. Bowfishrp

    Bowfishrp Member

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    Today my wife's AR has a failure to eject. I dropped the mag and pulled the bolt back and see the case stuck on the bolt. Stupidly I released the handle and the case went back in the chamber....only it didnt go all the way back in and was stuck. If it was similar to a bolt gun it would be a chamber-fitting case and it would have went right back in with no issue.

    I think this a perfect example of how the case is expanded larger that the chamber because of all the forces involved...and a prime example of why you always full length resize.

    BTW, once I cleared the bolt that case was smashed and went into the recycle bucket. The head was slightly damaged which caused the issue with the bolt....or it could be my fault for letting it try to go back in the chamber. Either way that case will never both another AR again. :)
     
  8. Bowfishrp

    Bowfishrp Member

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    jpwilly, I always use a case gauge for that very reason. Every autoloader round I resize goes through a case gauge just to be certain. I have had issues with some brass that simply would not resize no matter how many times I ran them in the die. Even tried different brand dies but when they are this bad I just throw them in the recycle bucket.
     
  9. Speedster00

    Speedster00 Member

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    I use case gauges as well for this reason
     
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