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223 with a Dillon 1050

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Pardoner, Oct 10, 2010.

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  1. Pardoner

    Pardoner Member

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    Any pros and cons for loading 223 on a Dillon 1050?

    I plan to use once-fired military brass.

    Thanks!
     
  2. esheato

    esheato Member

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    I can't think of any cons except for the expense involved in stockpiling components to feed it.

    Swaging is done on the press, IIRC, so no worries there.
     
  3. jmorris

    jmorris Member

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    Pros: Fast, easy and does almost everything.

    Cons: not cheap, you still have to trim separately (I use a 650).


    Here is a short video of my bullet fed 1050 loading 223.

    th_1050.jpg
     
  4. esheato

    esheato Member

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    Ahh, trimming! Totally forgot about it.

    I've got a Giraud sitting here so trimming is barely a blip on my radar anymore.
     
  5. joed

    joed Member

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    You shouldn't have any problems, I never did when I loaded it on the 1050. More then anything make a good powder choice or you'll get some erratic loads. I found H335 worked very well.
     
  6. flashhole

    flashhole Member

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    jmorris - that's a pretty impressive video. You must do a lot of shooting.
     
  7. Pardoner

    Pardoner Member

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    Yea. I understand that I can't do all the case prep in one pass.

    I was thinking about setting up one tool head just to do case prep. This way I can process a bunch of brass and reload it when I need it and I can sell off some of my extra brass that I have.
     
  8. taliv

    taliv Moderator

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    good advice so far in this thread. i also use a 1050, giraud trimmer and a ball powder (one of the accurate data powders usually, like 2230-c).

    trimming is still a PITA and i wish there was a better solution.

    the swager is awesome and a definite reason to buy a 1050. HOWEVER make sure you get ONCE-FIRED brass and NOT never-fired brass with primers made chemically inert.

    i haven't got the bullet feeder yet, but i would like one.
     
  9. jmorris

    jmorris Member

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    It is loud and not cheap but the Dillon trimmer does 1800 cases an hour no sweat. I run two size/expander dies on a 650 one before the trim and another after. The only after (and the one in station #2 of the 1050 and expander on #3) iron out any sharp edges after the cases are trimmed.

    trimmer.jpg
     
  10. taliv

    taliv Moderator

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    yeah, i looked at that a couple years ago, but just couldn't justify the price tag of a dedicated 650.

    even if i could afford it, i don't have room on the bench, or room for another bench.


    can that thing do 223 and 308 w/o changing anything?
     
  11. Pardoner

    Pardoner Member

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    I have about 50k of 308 brass. I am sure it will work equally well with the 1050?

    I have more than a ton (yes 2300+ lbs) of 223 brass that I want to go through and get processed before I start on the 308 stuff.
     
  12. dc.fireman

    dc.fireman Member

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    the 1050 seems like it was practically made for the volume military brass - a couple of things I can tell you from experience:

    1. make certain the bench is locked down. I was getting some powder spillage from mine, which means cleaning the press internals with a higher frequency.

    2. using a decent ball or stick powder (AA 2230, 2460; Varget, IMR4895/H4895). The powder charging station is fairly accurate - within .1 to .2 gr. variance. The powder check station is what I seem to have a fair amount of trouble getting to work consistently.

    3. There is a short-stroke prevention tab on the back - it can snap if you short stroke the press.

    4. My case feeder worked well when it was new - I'm having some issues with cases getting lodged under the shell feed plate now - I've adjusted 'til the cows came home, without much luck.

    5. My COAL have a typical variance of around .001-.002" - using Sierra SMK HPBT 69's.

    6. The entire operation takes a little tinkering, but when it runs, it really runs - my output has usually been around 600 per hour, stopping only to refill the various hoppers, trays, and feeders.

    My advice - get one, if you want volume/stockpile ammo, go a different route if you're looking for benchrest ammo.

    Some of the parts that I'd say aren't optional - the low primer sensor, the enlarged bullet tray, and the extra large Akro bin for holding finished ammo (it fills up fast!), and the assembly DVD made life a lot easier (it comes shipped in three parts).

    I like Dillons dies - they're on the higher end of die prices, but they're well thought out designs. Get some locking die rings - they don't come with them.

    PM me if you have other questions, good luck.

    -tc
     
  13. jmorris

    jmorris Member

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    I use the 650's for pistol loads and already had a conversion for .223, so I used it instead of the 1050 with another tool head. Now that I have the 1050 auto drive I might put the trimmer on it.

    You cannot just go from 223 to 308. You have to the whole caliber conversion and of course the dies are different.
     
  14. flashhole

    flashhole Member

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    Pardoner- how did you come by so much brass?
     
  15. jmorris

    jmorris Member

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    I pick up a lot from our range from LEO training and 3 gun shoots. The rest comes from annealing others brass “for a cut of the yield”.
     
  16. Pardoner

    Pardoner Member

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    I bought some military surplus.

    So far it has been a real PITA and I don't know if I would even consider doing it again.

    I have a lot of 12 ga hulls to get rid of also.
     
  17. flashhole

    flashhole Member

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    Where to you keep a ton of brass? That seems like a lot to deal with. I take it you intend to sell it?
     
  18. Jeff H

    Jeff H Member

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    Interesting, I didn't know that.
     
  19. dc.fireman

    dc.fireman Member

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    In fact, they're actually a kind of soft steel, easily nicked and rounded by their 1" bench wrench...
     
  20. RhinoDefense

    RhinoDefense Member

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    I had a horrible time getting my 1050 tuned in with .223. Finally figured out it was a brass issue coupled with an out of spec sizing die.

    It's a nice press for volume loading.

    With that much brass, I'd just ship it to TJ Conevera and have them process it for you on Scharch machines. That's what I have done.
     
  21. Pardoner

    Pardoner Member

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    Any idea how much they charge to run it through their Scharch?

    The only drawback that I see to the Scharch is that it reams the primer pocket and I would prefer to swag it and that is the extent the Scharch does to processing?

    If I run it through a 1050, I can produce fully processed cases. Of course at a slower rate.
     
  22. RhinoDefense

    RhinoDefense Member

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    Been a while since the last time I had some done. Can't remember the pricing.

    Reaming and swaging are like Ford v Chevy. In the end, they get the same result and neither is better than the other.

    The Scharch machines will also inspect it for integrity and cull the unsafe brass.
     
  23. Deavis

    Deavis Member

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    There are cons to loading 223 on a 1050? I didn't know...

    Get an extra toolhead, setup a carbide sizing die, trimmer, and a Lyman M-Die. Process it through, switch the head, and then load it with a universal decap in station 1. Double swage insures that even the most stubborn crimp will come out, M-die takes care of any interior burrs. Get the KISS feeder, works like a champ.

    If you have the scratch, automate it, it is worth it for the trimming, not so much on the loading.
     
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