Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

226 arrests so far for one man...

Discussion in 'Legal' started by Autolycus, Aug 16, 2006.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Autolycus

    Autolycus Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2006
    Messages:
    5,456
    Location:
    In the land of make believe.
     
  2. orangelo

    orangelo member

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2006
    Messages:
    466
    Location:
    Texas
    He's just a misunderstood disadvantaged minority abused youth. :rolleyes:

    Maybe they should pass a 225 Strikes and You're Out law.
     
  3. Taurus 66

    Taurus 66 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2004
    Messages:
    1,485
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    YA THINK?! :mad:

    There's slow, then there's Nebraska.
     
  4. Autolycus

    Autolycus Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2006
    Messages:
    5,456
    Location:
    In the land of make believe.
    Taurus 66

    Great quote!
     
  5. mountainclmbr

    mountainclmbr Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2003
    Messages:
    1,289
    Location:
    On top of a mountain in Colorado
    These people make great press for higher taxes to support more police who will let him go again to repeat the process.
     
  6. Taurus 66

    Taurus 66 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2004
    Messages:
    1,485
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    Thanks Tecumseh. This so inspired me to make it a fortified part of my signature line.
     
  7. carpettbaggerr

    carpettbaggerr Member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2003
    Messages:
    1,676
    Lucky you can't legally CCW in Nebraska. Who knows what trouble this guy'd get into. :scrutiny:

    All 'concealable' weapons must be registered with the Chief of Police? And people think NY is bad?

    BTW Taurus, Rochester ain't all that swift........

    :)
     
  8. DRZinn

    DRZinn Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2004
    Messages:
    3,991
    Location:
    In a pot of water, 200 degrees and rising slowly..
     
  9. Jeff White

    Jeff White Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    19,630
    Location:
    Alma Illinois
    Mountainclimber said;
    I beg to differ..it's the courts and the correctional system who let the criminals go, not the police. We get a little tired of dealing with our regular customers. Heck I was even told by one guy, that if he had to be arrested, he preferred I did it.....

    The problem is that we don't have enough prosecutors, public defenders, judges and courtroom staff or courtrooms themselves to handle all of the arrests that are made. Many of them get filed right in the trash bin.

    Just last week the states attorney released the bond on two people I had arrested for battery. Why, because there was no way they'd get into court before the 120 days the state has to get the case into court was up. If they held onto the bond money and the day 120 clock ran out, that's the end of the case, violation of the right to speedy trial. Now they have the option of refiling the charges and starting the whole process again when the docket is clear.

    They spent billions on more police, but neglected the rest of the system.

    Jeff
     
  10. Reyn

    Reyn Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2005
    Messages:
    484
    Location:
    AL
    "I beg to differ..it's the courts and the correctional system who let the criminals go, not the police. We get a little tired of dealing with our regular customers. Heck I was even told by one guy, that if he had to be arrested, he preferred I did it.....

    The problem is that we don't have enough prosecutors, public defenders, judges and courtroom staff or courtrooms themselves to handle all of the arrests that are made. Many of them get filed right in the trash bin.

    Just last week the states attorney released the bond on two people I had arrested for battery. Why, because there was no way they'd get into court before the 120 days the state has to get the case into court was up. If they held onto the bond money and the day 120 clock ran out, that's the end of the case, violation of the right to speedy trial. Now they have the option of refiling the charges and starting the whole process again when the docket is clear.

    They spent billions on more police, but neglected the rest of the system."


    You are right. Unfortunately LEOs are generally the first to blame. If he has been arrested then the POLICE did their part.
     
  11. cracked junior

    cracked junior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2006
    Messages:
    187
    Location:
    nebraska
    nebraska is pretty messed up in the courts and law enforcement. a few years ago. i had a friend, that got into drugs pretty heavy. he went crazy. his parents tried to admit him to the pysch ward at the hospital. but after doing the testing and interviewing, the cops and the hospital deemed he was safe to be released. that night he killed an innoncent person. it went to trial. he got not guily by reason of insanity. so i think he is spending the rest of his life in a pysch ward. theres alot more to this story but i cant think of it. my girlfriend thinks i am crazy for even knowing him, even more crazy for drinking beer with him. i just say he was a nice guy when i knew him. the next crazy part is. i moved from that town, this happened like 2 months after i moved. i found out later, he worked where i work now.

    another crazy nebraska court system story. another friend, his dad has had over 25 dui/dwi convictions since the 70s.
     
  12. Art Eatman

    Art Eatman Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2002
    Messages:
    43,275
    Location:
    Terlingua, TX; Thomasville,GA
    For some perspective about Jeff's comment, consider the issue of plea bargains.

    From an article I read way back, Queens, NY, has courtrooms and judges/staff for some 450 felony cases per year. However, the annual rate of felony indictments was around 4,800.

    Want it better? Pay more taxes is the only answer I know. (Or reduce other spending, which we know ain't gonna happen insofar as social spending. Might get cuts in infrastructure programs, of course.)

    Art
     
  13. rhubarb

    rhubarb Member

    Joined:
    May 28, 2005
    Messages:
    765
    Location:
    South Texas
    What's a burglar tool? A screwdriver? A rock to bust a window?

    Next thing you know, they'll be arresting folks for carrying murder tools, i.e. pocketknives.


    This guy obviously ain't ever gonna be a productive member of society, but come on. If he commits a crime, lock him up and throw away the key. If not, let him be.
     
  14. Taurus 66

    Taurus 66 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2004
    Messages:
    1,485
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    Yes, a screwdriver is one burglar's tool. It can swing locks on older type windows with minimum damage to the window frame. Another one could be ... oh I don't know, "bolt cutters" for instance, (great for cutting locks to back yard sheds) and upon questioning at a traffic stop, he has no reasonable explanation (or fumbles with his words) as to why he has any particular tool in his vehicle. Or how about a glass cutter in combination with bolt cutters? Now a glass cutter would be excellent for bypassing a house of known "glass break coverage" ONLY on the home security system because it would be already known in advance there are not motion detectors set up inside. What I mean to say is most burglaries committed are by a known acquaintance.

    These are a few of their fa-vor-ite things ...
     
  15. Ryder

    Ryder Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2002
    Messages:
    2,433
    Location:
    Mid-Michigander
    Right on rhubarb. How did they even know he had "burglar tools"on him. From the sounds of this write-up their probable cause was that they recognized him. I don't doubt he has caused some of his problems in the past but being known by the police does make people an easy mark for abuse of power. It's something I've taken care to warn my children against. Seen too many others chewed to pieces by this phenomenon over the years.
     
  16. progunner1957

    progunner1957 member

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2004
    Messages:
    831
    Location:
    A wolf living in Sheeple land
    For God's sake - give the man a chance, people!!!

    Hey, give the guy a chance! ANYBODY can make 226 mistakes!

    After all, that's not so bad - it's only an average of 10 arrests per year, every year, over the last 26 years - it could happen to anybody...:rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:
    See?? He's really not that bad after all!:scrutiny:
     
  17. zoom6zoom

    zoom6zoom Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2006
    Messages:
    2,908
    Location:
    Virginia
    Well, if the arresting officer had personally dealt with this guy many times before, I'd consider that sufficient probable cause.
     
  18. MechAg94

    MechAg94 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2005
    Messages:
    4,734
    And these are the poor people who complain about not affording car insurance. :)


    The only solution I can think of is to max out penalties when people commit petty crime. If the criminals know they will get the bool thrown at them, they might limit their behavior. That 4800 number might drop off some.
     
  19. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2006
    Messages:
    572
    Isn't Lincoln, Nebraska, one of the cities that is banning concealed carry after the state adopted a concealed carry law last year?

    Here is a link to some news stories onthe subject, and, yes, Lincoln is among them.
    http://www.georgiapacking.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=548
     
  20. WayneConrad

    WayneConrad Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2005
    Messages:
    2,128
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    "Want it better? Pay more taxes is the only answer I know. (Or reduce other spending, which we know ain't gonna happen insofar as social spending. Might get cuts in infrastructure programs, of course.)"

    Art, We could have fewer laws, too. We could have only laws we are going to enforce, and we could enforce them every time.
     
  21. Phetro

    Phetro Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2006
    Messages:
    491
    Location:
    Indiana
    Of course. Everyone whom a particular cop knows on sight should be subject to detainment and questioning just because they have been arrested before.

    How many convictions does he have? How many of those arrests have been nothing more than harassment?

    Never trust blindly. Especially never trust what a media source tells you, or implies. NEVER.
     
  22. Just_a_dude_with_a_gun

    Just_a_dude_with_a_gun Member

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2006
    Messages:
    557
    Location:
    Peoples Republik of Neu Jersey
    But, "everybody loved him, and he was trying to turn his life around"...
     
  23. DRZinn

    DRZinn Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2004
    Messages:
    3,991
    Location:
    In a pot of water, 200 degrees and rising slowly..
    I just can't believe that there even is such a charge as "felony possession of burglar tools."
     
  24. bouis

    bouis member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2006
    Messages:
    369
    The answer is more lawyers? Could the solution be worse than the problem? Heh.
     
  25. Coronach

    Coronach Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2002
    Messages:
    11,109
    :rolleyes: This is found on the same thread as moaning about how the justice system is just one huge revolving door? I think I found the problem. ;) We, the get-tough-on-crime-dear-lord-the-cops-just-let-him-go-again crowd can't even get on the same page. Add in a few blissninnies and it's no wonder we have guys with rap sheets as long as my, erm, arm.

    As to the "police" letting him go, I think we need to take a look at how the justice system works. The poh-leece catch him, the prosecutors take the case to a judge, the judge and jury try him, and the corrections system, if applicable, punishes him. As was said, if he got caught and nothing happened, it's most likely not the fault of the police.

    What Art said is correct. If we were to funnel money into the CJS, we should be doing it on the court side and the corrections side. I'm not saying that police budgets are not cash-strapped (they are, at least around here), but at any given time the police, even with insufficient manpower and resources, are able to pack stack and rack the caseload for the prosecutors and, subsequently, stack the dockets for the court so deep that they could not possibly address a fraction of the cases that come before the judge. The only solutions to this are more prosecutors and judges, or to make less arrests. I dunno about you, but the latter does not sound like a good option. And the former costs $$$.

    As to "felony possession of burglar tools"...

    ...most jurisdictions hve some flavor of this. The charge around here is PCT: possession of criminal tools. What is a criminal tool, you ask? An object that can be used in the facilitation of a crime, based upon the nature of the object and the circumstance in which it was found. The last bit is key. If you're found with a screwdriver in your pocket, that is not PCT. If you're found with a screwdiver in your pocket while standing atop a trash can, beside a window of a house you do not own, at 0-dark-30, you CAN be charged with PCT. The officer making the charge will have to substantiate why he had probable cause to believe that you were attempting to commit a crime with this tool, as opposed to charitably making a home repair for a complete stranger in the wee hours of the night, in his arrest paperwork in order to get an indictment, and he will have to prove the same, beyond reasonable doubt, to a judge or jury in order to get a conviction.

    Mike
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page