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$300 or less handgun for 8 year old to shoot

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by mewachee, May 22, 2008.

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  1. mewachee

    mewachee Member

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    I am thinking bearcat. Accuracy is more important than lead down range. Having to work a little harder for each shot will help him focus on making each count. This is how he is with his rifle.

    I am still considering the single six, just because of the mag add on.
     
  2. 461

    461 Member

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    Bearcat all the way!! I bought one for my daughter when she was nine (16 now) and it's given us years of fun with many more to come. The Single-Six is just too big for a little guy, the grip is actually the same exact grip as the Blackhawk and it's just too much for tiny hands.
     
  3. Gunsby_Blazen

    Gunsby_Blazen Member

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    Like the man said,
    Ruger Bearcat or Mk I, II, or III, they are all good .22 shooters.
     
  4. sixgunner455

    sixgunner455 Member

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    I'll jump on that statement, too!!

    How 'bout a 3 or 4 year old sitting on my lap with plugs and muffs and cute little glasses? Yeah, I had to hold the gun up, and yeah, the target was a big old box only a few feet away, but both of them love shooting.

    Fed 'em on a diet of .22 rounds from very tiny. 11 year old can shoot that pistol by herself now, and does. Loves her .22 single-shot, too. 8 year old prefers his bb gun.
     
  5. JackCrow

    JackCrow Member

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    I've never used a Bearcat, But I have used my Single Six and my Marlin 60 to teach my children to shoot.
     
  6. Guillermo

    Guillermo member

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    The gun in question largely has to do with how strong he is.

    As to the silliness that an 8 year old is too young to own a gun please allow me to weigh in.

    My delightful daughter has been shooting since she was 6. She has owned her own pistol since she was 10 or 11.

    Interestingly enough she is turning 15tomorrow and I am giving her a Smith model 19 .357.

    BTW, she joined the NRA on her own.
     
  7. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    Guillermo,
    A M19 is some great present for sure.... It's great to here all the Dad's in this thread talking about teaching their daughters to shoot. That's the way it should be, teach all the children to shoot and to be safe around firearms. The children are our future for the shooting sports. The more women who shoot the less women who will vote for anti-gun laws.

    Taking all the children shooting, fishing, hunting, camping and hiking will only ensure the future of all those activities.
     
  8. papajohn

    papajohn Member

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    Guillermo, you're a great Dad. And if she joined the NRA on her own, she's clearly a pretty sharp kid! Good on the both of ya! :)

    PJ
     
  9. Guillermo

    Guillermo member

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    Thank you for the kind words. I AM a little proud of her.

    The Smith is an extravagant gift but she knows not to expect something so grandiose every gift giving occasion.

    I send her to a really good parochial school and make sure she keeps her busy with athletics and other positive activities. No X-box or Playstation. She buys her own gadgets like her MP3 player and therefore takes care of them. She can change the oil in the car, rebuild a toilet and has constructed a cedar privacy fence.

    All this is to say that a well directed child, including an 8 year old boy, can be taught to be responsible and self sufficient. Doing so creates a more content, grounded young person with a better chance of growing up into a worthy adult (in my never-so-humble opinion)
     
  10. MaterDei

    MaterDei Member

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    7 years old

    [​IMG]

    8 years old

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Guillermo

    Guillermo member

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    LOVE the shot of the boy with the 45! The Spiderman shirt really makes it.
     
  12. chupacabrah

    chupacabrah Member

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    I had never shot any form of a gun until I was about 20 years old. That's when I bought my first BB gun. Then I had paintball guns. Shot my brother's Glock 9mm. My parents wouldn't let me have any real guns in their house, and also never taught me anything about them.

    I just bought my first handgun this year (almost 26 now). And mostly everything I learned about guns I learned from here, and from friends with guns, one of whom actually told me about this site.

    Now my dad shoots with me occasionally. I never even really knew he had any guns. Or maybe that he had them, but I never saw them, and hasn't shot them in about 20 years.

    That being said...I want to teach my child(ren) early about firearms and safety so that they know 1) what to do if they come across one, and 2) proper way to handle them at the range and at home.


    I will probably get my daughter some .22 when she is older (only 4 mos now). We have a Tec-22, but will probably get some single-action revolver .22 like someone mentioned in this thread. maybe a Single/double.

    My dad has an Iver Johnson break-open .22 revolver, it shoots okay. shoots better than i thought it would after sitting for 20 years who knows where. the ammo in it even worked!
     
  13. Guillermo

    Guillermo member

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    Hey Chupacabrah,

    Congrats on the little girl. Kids are a joy.

    Start early (age 3 or 4) with Eddy Eagle coloring books. They state that if you see a gun don't touch, leave the area, tell an adult. Good advice for anything dangerous.

    When she can understand explain that guns are like electricity. It is your friend but you have to be very careful with it. (Having the little ones around light sockets was scary for me)

    This is the best time of your life. Such the marrow out of every moment!
     
  14. MiddleAgedKen

    MiddleAgedKen Member

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    Single Six is an excellent choice. If you can't find one in your price range (you should if you're patient), Heritage now offers a steel-framed version of the Rough Rider for around $200 (probably less). My first handgun was an alloy Rough Rider, and I still shoot it a lot. It's a convertible, .22LR/.22WMR, just like the Single Six.
     
  15. Gordon
    • Contributing Member

    Gordon Contributing Member

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    Ruger Bearcat is perfect!
     
  16. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    Started at age 9 with my Benjamin .22 caliber pump up air pistol which I still have, but leaks air. I got my first shotgun at age 7 and was hunting dove by age 9. I got my first .22 rifle at age 9, too. Earlier the better IMHO. I was really fortunate that my uncle was an AWESOME shot and NRA instructor and my grandpa was an avid outdoorsman, too. I was shooting my Uncle's K22 masterpiece (God, what a fantastic revolver that was!) by age 6 under his supervision, of course.

    I'd say good used Ruger Mk 2, they'll grow into it. Bearcat would fit smaller hands and is lighter, I suppose, but the Mk 2 is awesome accurate.. Or, you can get a new Mk 3, sells for a little over 300 commonly and you might be able to find one on sale or something reduced. I got a Mk 2 at a gun show recently for 275 with 2x scope and mount. I could sell the mount/scope if I didn't need it and maybe get 50 bucks back. It's a BSA scope, about 60 dollars new, about 30 new for the mount. So, figure the gun with iron sights would be 225 if I sold the optics, not a bad deal. I like the scope on it, though. :D
     
  17. t3rmin

    t3rmin Member

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    You guys are making me jealous! I've got a 1.5-yr-old and can't wait 'till he's a little older. 'Course the wife wants him to stay a baby forever. ;-)

    We have plans to move out to the country soon, partially to facilitate firearms use and training.
     
  18. c1ogden

    c1ogden Member

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    For single actions, a Ruger Single Six or Bearcat, or Colt Peacemaker/New Frontier.

    For double actions, Smith Model 34 or 63 (same gun in stainless steel).

    All are .22s
     
  19. DrLaw

    DrLaw Member

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    thoughts

    We think of kids today at 8 as being too young to shoot, but forget that years ago it was common for kids with some money in the family to have a BB gun, and those that didn't, probably used the family .22 or shotgun for rabbits, squirrel or other kitchen fare (in the country side as opposed to the cities, of course).

    What we didn't have then was a lack of spanking, personal responsibility, and passing the buck while parenting.

    If a parent stays with the kid while the kid is shooting, and teaches the kid all the safety points, before, during and after shooting sessions, as well as during cleaning. Being there for your kid or grandkid, being with them to help, teach and enjoy with them.

    The photos I see here are some happy kids. Good job to those who got those smiles.

    The Doc is out now. :cool:
     
  20. Sistema1927

    Sistema1927 Member

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    I had my daughter shooting a Colt 1908 .380 at age FOUR. That was 25 years ago, and she is still in one piece.
     
  21. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    A local criminal lawyer I know told me he's had to defend many kids against school districts with what he calls a "no brains" as opposed to "no tolerance" policy. The kid is guilty until proven innocent and can only be defended in court, but once expelled, he's expelled. Not much legal action can do about it. In this county, there are lots of hunters, it's rural. They have police dogs go through the cars in the highschool parking lot on occasion and, of course, they'll hit on a loose shotgun shell or something. That's enough to get a kid in trouble. So, he got home from duck hunting and a shell fell out of his shell pouch he didn't see. Now, he's some kind of terrorist or something? :rolleyes: MY GOD people, pull your friggin' heads out from your posterior, this is TEXAS, this is a county with a population of less than 30,000 total, kids hunt, just like I did at that age.

    I remember one opening day of duck season getting permission to leave class at 2PM to go hunting with a buddy. We got on my CT90, rode over to the junior college where his mom worked, got our shotguns and gear out of her trunk, then went hunting. No problems, no one freakin' out, no liberals screaming bloody murder and calling 911. We had a danged good shoot that afternoon, too, as I recall. Front blew in about noon. Colder'n hell on the bike, but we got limits. :D If they ran schools then like they do now, I'd probably still be in prison. :rolleyes:

    I understand the angst over stuff like Columbine, but not every kid with a gun is a terrorist lookin' to kill his classmates, for Christ's sake! Around here, lots of kids still hunt and shoot and they generally start early. This ain't LA or NYC, it's smack in the middle of "fly over country", just a tad south. We don't even have a Starbucks here. If you're scared of kids with guns, you wouldn't like it here.
     
  22. WNTFW

    WNTFW Member

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    Beretta Neos is another option. I paid $198.00 for mine & got $10.00 mags from CDNN.
     
  23. Guillermo

    Guillermo member

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    Hey Mikey

    She liked it
     

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  24. anapex

    anapex Member

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    I hunted for a Bearcat for this exact reason. I wanted to start my two oldest with a pistol and the bearcat imho has one of the best sized grips for little hands. It also has nice deliberate steps you have to take to get the gun ready to go. That said both (6 and 7) loved to shoot and were able to load, unload, and cock and fire the gun.

    Also I'm not sure about your area but bearcats here are rare/popular. I hunted for months before I even found one. One shop here had a 2-3 month backorder on them.
     
  25. rocinante

    rocinante Member

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    Go with a Ruger Mark III 22/45. Lightweight, low recoil, dependable.

    I do not think 8 is too young if they show an interest and have what I would call the temperament. Drill, Drill, Drill, Drill safety into them. Case in point. My youngest is 8. He wants to handle my S&W 915. I told him the safety rules. He repeated them. I unloaded it with him watching. Showed him how to operate it and assure it is indeed unloaded. I handed it to him and the FIRST thing he did was point it at my head. I had a fit and he was what is the big deal it is unloaded. Drill, Drill, Drill some more. Teach him to shoot but watch him like a hawk. Honestly that is my advise for anyone with a gun regardless of age or experience.
     
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