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303 loads...

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Third_Rail, Sep 29, 2005.

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  1. Third_Rail

    Third_Rail Member

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    What powder would I be able to use behind both 123-125 gr spitzers and 180 gr RNSP bullets, if any?


    I understand that if the powder worked in both, it wouldn't exactly be ideal for either - but I'm trying to use as few things as possible in terms of different powders, etc.
     
  2. rbernie
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    rbernie Member

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    BTDT - H4895
     
  3. Third_Rail

    Third_Rail Member

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    Hm, Hodgdon's website says that can be used in 180gr loads and in 150gr loads, nothing about 125gr.
     
  4. Ol` Joe

    Ol` Joe Member

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    Speer shows it (4895) with all bullet wgts, also 4064, IMR4350 and H414 are listed.
     
  5. Third_Rail

    Third_Rail Member

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    Ok, 4895 it is, then, along with Speer Reloading Manual.
     
  6. Clark

    Clark Member

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    The 303 Brit is hard on cases, becuaser the Enfield action is springy.
    That, and there is often too much headpace.

    My attitude would be to either resign myself to wear out cases and use book loads, or fire form and then load wimpy.
     
  7. Gewehr98

    Gewehr98 Member

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    With my 123gr AK-47 bullet loads, I use IMR4895.

    Lightweight, very comfortable load, especially out of a No5Mk1 Jungle Carbine.

    Take a look here:

    http://www.303british.com

    In particular, this load data page:

    http://www3.sympatico.ca/shooters/LoadData2s.htm

    If you're worried about stretching or breaking the brass (often a concern with rimmed bottleneck rifle brass), neck size only, or buy an RCBS X-Die.
     
  8. rbernie
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    rbernie Member

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    When I started playing around with this about two years ago, I started by loading Sierra 125s using the max H322/H4895 load data available for Sierra 150's. That was a good place to start, as it turns out. I've had relatively poor luck velocity-wise with anything slower than Varget/RE15 in the 123gr/125gr range, although H414/760 gave me good accuracy in exchange for being slow.

    At this point, I have a really nice load that tops out at just over 3000fps IN MY PARTICULAR No4Mk1 using a stout load (over max in any reference but safe in my rifle) of H4895 and the Sierra PH 125gr. I usually don't push it that far, though, and run a moderate-range load that nets just under 2900fps. That load also happens to be the same load that I use for the Sierra PH 150's, so I use it primarily to avoid having to reset the powder drop. :D

    PM me if you want more starting/max load data with chrono numbers; most of my stuff is moderately over book max but acceptable for use in my rifles because of their, ah, moderately eroded throat conditions.
     
  9. rbernie
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    rbernie Member

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    While I'm at it...

    This seems to be repeated quite often in reference to the Enfield, but I've never actually been able to find the source data to back it up. It's almost as if this has become part of the lore of the Enfield, and nobody can actually remember where/when/why it got started. I don't seem to recall the L42 Enfield-action 7.62NATO sniper rifle (built on the No4 action) being particularly hard on brass... :rolleyes:

    The reality is, from my experience, that the Enfield action isn't springy insomuch as the 303R chambers were cut extra-large for reliability in the trenches with potentially muddy ammo. Working the brass by full-length resizing will indeed shorten the brass life, but that's just because it got blown out so far from spec when first fired. Neck sizing is indeed a good way to get 'normal' case life in a 303R.

    One of the strengths of the Enfield design in the ability to correct headspace issues via replacement of the rotating bolt head. (No4/No5's are marked as to size, but No1s are a trial-n-error fit.)
     
  10. Paul "Fitz" Jones

    Paul "Fitz" Jones Moderator - Emeritus

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    303 brit/303 Savage

    As a Civilian rangemaster I found 20 brass cases where someone had fired 20 303 Savage rounds in a 303 British rifle. I stil have them as they are an example of stupidity and none of them split and they expanded perfectly.
    Anyone want them when I run across them again?
     
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