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.357 125gr 2400 powder

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by pm8675309, Mar 29, 2017.

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  1. pm8675309

    pm8675309 Member

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  2. mjsdwash

    mjsdwash Member

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    if you go super hot, the bullets jump the crimp groove, and can bind the gun hard, depending on the type. You may need to hammer the bullet back in, or shave it off, depending on the tools you have. that said, both 2400, and H110 do not product exciting performance, around 1400 FPS at max load, verified with a chronograph, so you may be okay. Its not much hotter than heavy 9mm (1250 with the same weight bullet), and they dont roll crimp. If you get heavier bullets, its more necessary.
     
  3. Sunray

    Sunray Member

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    Some what loads?
    Assuming you mean hot loads, 2400 loads aren't that hot. Max loads for a jacketed 125 are slower than some start loads with other powders. Titegroup, for example, starts faster than 2400 max loads(1409 fps). H4227(1,692 fps) and Win 296/H110(1,881 fps) start a lot faster than 2400 max loads.
    Anyway, an HP like the XTP requires velocity to expand reliably. An FMJRN doesn't expand at all. So it'll depend on what you want to do with the ammo. The crimp on hot loads can be a roll crimp(and normally is with .357.) or a taper crimp if you have the right die. Having a cannelure just makes crimping easier and doesn't damage the bullet. Even though that damage won't hurt anything.
    The Armscor FMJRN is probably intended for lighter loads that don't need crimp anyway.
     
  4. pm8675309

    pm8675309 Member

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    Sounds good, thanks for the info guys. I have 3 pistol powders: HP38, 2400 and H110. Mild, medium and hot. I'm just target shooting and experimenting. Enjoying reloading as a recreational hobby.
     
  5. Steve C

    Steve C Member

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    2400 and H110 are both slow burning pistol powders that provide excellent velocities and plenty of muzzle flash in handguns. The difference in velocities at the upper end of the load range is minimal though you need 2 or more grains of H110 to get the same velocity that you can achieve with less 2400. You can download 2400 and should use standard primers for loads with it.

    H110 is a volume sensitive powder that shouldn't be downloaded more than 3% otherwise you risk a squib load being stuck in the barrel. H110 works best with heavier bullets, needs magnum primers and heavy crimp for strong bullet pull to insure ignition. A crimp groove or cannelur will help produce a stronger crimp.

    I don't load 125gr bullets with the slow 2400 or H110 pistol powders for anything but rifle as maximum velocities in handgun can be reached with slightly faster powders in the Blue Dot burn rate range. Slow powders with lite bullets are quick to produce flame cutting and in pre 2000 K frame S&W's can damage the forcing cone.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2017
  6. someguy2800

    someguy2800 Member

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    I wouldn't load any 357's without either roll crimping into a groove or using a lee crimp die to make my own cannelure. Its worse in a light gun. I bound up my SP101 several times with heavy 158 grain loads. I experimented with increasingly heavy roll crimps into the cannelure using a standard seating die until I started to crush and buckle cases and was still having bullets jump out and tie up the gun. After that I finally got the lee crimp die and never had it happen since I started using that.
     
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  7. Glockula

    Glockula Member

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    The only 125s I have loaded with 2400 have been Hornady xtp's. My Rossi 92 really likes them. I have put a few through my Taurus 669 but like others have stated there are good reasons to shy away from hot 125s In a revolver. I really like 2400 as my magnum powder. More forgiving than H110\W296 aND has given all the velocity I need.
     
  8. Toprudder

    Toprudder Member

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    I will mention that there are two different Lee crimp dies that can be used for 357mag. There is the normal FCD that most people are familiar with (that will work with either 38spl or 357mag), and there is the Lee collet crimp die (357mag only). I highly recommend the collet crimp die. It can form a crimp groove in a jacketed bullet without risking buckling the cases.

    http://leeprecision.com/357-magnum-custom-collet-style-crimp-die.html
     
  9. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    I wouldn't use the Armscor for anything but light .357 loads, unless you have a way to tightly taper crimp them or are willing to buy a Le collet crimp die for .357. Neither way is conducive to accuracy (IMHO) on jacketed bullets with no cannelure. For a medium or hard crimp, you want a crimp groove or a cannelure.
     
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  10. Airman Basic

    Airman Basic Member

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    IMHE, bullet tension is more important than crimping force in keeping the bullet in the case. Increases combustion and velocity, also.
     
  11. someguy2800

    someguy2800 Member

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    I use the collet style crimp die in 357 magnum and the factory crimp die in every other pistol caliber. I'm a big fan of both.
     
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  12. someguy2800

    someguy2800 Member

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    I did try playing around with that by using a 9mm/.355" exander out of a 9mm die to try to create more tension on the bullet but they still jumped and tied up the cylinder. Next step was the collet die and that fixed it once and for all.

    I wonder if part of the issue is that at that time I didn't clean any pistol brass. I just loaded them over and over. I think the soot inside the case acts as sort of a dry lubricant.
     
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  13. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    Yes, neck tension is indeed very important, but with heavy recoiling rounds many times you need a firm roll crimp into a crimp groove or cannelure to stop bullet creep from recoil.
     
  14. ljnowell

    ljnowell Member

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    2400 is the classic magnum handgun powder, it is most definitely a "hot load" powder. The data currently on Alliants website shows very watered down velocities. I have load data, published official data, showing 1600+ fps with 2400 and a 158 grain bullet.

    If you believe that titegroup will outperform it, then you have obviously never chronographed 357 magnum loads. It ain't happening.
     
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  15. Dudedog
    • Contributing Member

    Dudedog Contributing Member

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    Not sure what you meant by stinker? Hot lots, Plinking loads?
    If you want stinky loads:), used lubed lead and Trailboss (which smells funny--cat pee??)

    HP38 is good for light - medium practice loads
    H110 is great for the full power stuff.
    I have never used any 2400 so I don't know about it.

    I have had good results with the following bullets
    Missouri bullet company offers THR mambers a 5% discount with the code, PM me if you need it. (MBC charges shipping but ships flat rate so it's not to bad)
    http://missouribullet.com/details.php?prodId=221&category=20&secondary=10&keywords= BHN 18 (harder work well for higher vel med-heacy loads) These are 140gr bullets a nice compromise between 125s and 158s
    http://missouribullet.com/details.php?prodId=381&category=20&secondary=9&keywords= BHN 12 (softer work better for lighter - plinking loads)

    Rocky Mountain Reloading offers THR member a 5% discount (shipping is included in RMRs prices) code The HighRoad5
    https://rmrbullets.com/shop/bullets...8-gr-rmr-round-nose-plated-hp/?v=7516fd43adaa
     
  16. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    1. Yes
    2. Yes
    3. 2400 is just behind H110/W296 and downloads better, but it is still a near full/full power load powder though. Not really midrange IMO. Think more like AA #5 or HS-6 (And similar) for "midrange" in .357.
     
  17. Jeff H

    Jeff H Member

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    A perfect example of when best to use 2400 would be shooting lead bullets out of a Rossi 92. I wasn't able to get accurate loads with the pistol loads I was using which were near max. Down loading a grain at a time until I got the accuracy I wanted. Still a really hot load, but you wouldn't want to download H110 as much as I did the 2400.
     
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