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.357 for Wild Pig

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by jackslayer, Apr 29, 2010.

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  1. jackslayer

    jackslayer Member

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    I plan to start hunting in the near future and wild pig seem to be a good place to start. Unlimited, easy to do it legal etc. Plus I've heard there's a ton of em out here in california. Would .357 mag with heavy loads be a good choice? What web sites would go over the basics for shot placement and animal anatomy? The only thing I have right now that would do the job is a 12 gauge with slugs. Just don't wanna destroy the meat. Thanks for any info you have ;)
     
  2. gallo

    gallo Member

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    It's OK... as a backup to a 30-30 or your shotgun. Those things are vicious when wounded.
     
  3. memphisjim

    memphisjim Member

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    take the 12 gauge if you value your meat over the pigs
     
  4. David E

    David E Member

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    I took my first pig with a .44 magnum Trapper length Winchester. The shot was about 80 yds. It did the job.

    The next three I was present for all used a .223, all with good results.

    Largest pig was 250-300 lbs or so. I'd say it depends how big the pigs are in your neck of the woods. The .357, presuming you can hit with it, can do just fine......if the pigs aren't crazy big.
     
  5. Roughneck08

    Roughneck08 Member

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    Definitely trust them when they say, "Don't worry about ruining the meat". If you get the chance, you will quickly learn that you won't ruin the meat with a slug. Hogs are tough critters. Any heavy .357 heavy load would be a fine backup weapon. My good friend uses his blackhawk in .357 when we catch hogs with his pit bulls. The largest we have bayed and caught were 220lbs max.
     
  6. oldfool

    oldfool Member

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    what he said, yes
    depends how big the pig
    357 fine for Texas size
    not fine for south Georgia size, (tote a 30-30 or something like)
     
  7. 257x50

    257x50 Member

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    Look for your horsepower thru bullet weight, not speed.
     
  8. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    I don't think there's really any difference in Texas an Georgia hogs except for those faked Hozilla pictures where the guy shot a farm raized 1000 lb pig and tried to palm it off on the net as wild. :rolleyes:

    I shoot meat hogs with a .357, works just fine. Much over 200 lbs and I don't want 'em, anyway. The caliber is under-rated in the hunting world. It will penetrate the shoulders of a big, gristled up 350-400 lber with the right bullet. I shoot either a 180 grain Hornady XTP at 1400 fps or a 165 grain hard cast gas checked Keith style SWC at 1470 fps. The hogs I've killed have been with the 165 grain bullet, though I shot one with my 3" carry not long ago, 140 grain Speer JHP to the head from about 15 yards. He was only about 80 lbs, but a head shot would do in his papa. :D

    I prefer both.
     
  9. kanook

    kanook Member

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    357 hardcast 180 behind the ear. Stay away from JHP or HP. The harder the better. You want penetration. They are not bullet proof, but really close to it.
     

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  10. 257x50

    257x50 Member

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    MCgunner says it so much better.................
     
  11. natman

    natman Member

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    Use the 12 ga with slugs and don't worry about the meat. A slug starts out somewhere in the teens and is not going to bloodshot the meat.

    Sure it's possible to kill a hog with a 357. It's also possible to wound one with it, a lot more possible than with a more suitable round.
     
  12. CWL

    CWL Member

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    I've hunted wild pigs in N. CA. I use a shotgun. I have carried my .357 as a sidearm with hard cast loads, but only for shooting downwards from a tree, or to finish a wounded pig with.

    Wouldn't be my primary.
     
  13. Quoheleth

    Quoheleth Member

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    Pigs are tough. They are not Abrams tanks, impermiable to all things not depleted uranium.

    A good, hardcast lead bullet (see Missouri Bullet's 180gr "Striker") or something like Hornady's 180gr XTP should do the job just fine. Use a good dose of AA#9 or 2400 and you're good to go.

    Stay away from the monster piggies. Look for something in the 200lb range. They will taste better in the long run.

    Placement will be key. Get a big sheet of cardboard and sketch the likeness of a pig on it. Don't sketch in the "kill zone" - I have yet to see a wild animal that had the convenient circles on it. Set it at various distances. If you can't find and hit the kill zone at a given distance, don't shoot the real thing at that distance. If all you can manage is 25 yards, keep your hog shots under 25 yards. Nothing is more unethical than outshooting your ability and wounding an animal. If you're a 50-yard shooter, don't take the 100-yard shot.

    Q
     
  14. JJE

    JJE Member

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    I've hunted pigs a few times in CA, but never taken a shot at one. I'm a public land cheapskate, and hog-hunting on public land is pretty slim pickins. Although the state is full of public land, most of it is poor habitat (which is why it's public land) - it's either bone dry half the year or very, very rugged. The best public land is adjacent to private land with water, and the best county state-wide I believe is Monterey, followed by the "wine country" counties. Check out http://www.jesseshunting.com/- for lots of info, and alot of it is CA-specific.

    My ballistic experience versus pigs is non-existent, but I've settled on a 12" Contender in 357 magnum (2x scope, 140 gr XTPs or 140 gr Barnes XPBs in the no-lead zone around Monterey) as my rig if I ever hunt pigs again, but I'll be looking for a succulent 50-pounder. If I thought I might be shooting a full-grown animal, I'd carry a rifle (30-30 would do).
     
  15. 257x50

    257x50 Member

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    If you have a Contender, ream it out to 357 Max when you can. Serious flat shooter and as much HP as a 44.
     
  16. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    Just get a 12" .30-30 barrel for that contender frame. With the right handload, it'll drop any pig that walks. So will the .357, though. :D The .30-30 lays down 1000 ft lbs at 200 yards, though, loaded with a 140 Barnes bullet or a 150 Nosler BT.
     
  17. oneounceload

    oneounceload member

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    IIRC, CA has Russian boars which can get plenty big. Friend popped over the hill from NV to do a boar - the guide suggested he use his 30-06. His boar was over 400 pounds. If you're hunting little pigs or javelina sized porkers, a hard cast 357 might do a decent job at close range. Personally, I'd opt for the shotgun and buck or slugs
     
  18. Buck Snort

    Buck Snort Member

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    "I plan to start hunting in the near future and wild pig seem to be a good place to start. Unlimited, easy to do it legal etc. Plus I've heard there's a ton of em out here in california."

    Problem is most of them are on private property in Monterey County and you'll pay an arm and a leg to hunt. Been there, seen that, done it, and bought the T-shirt.
     
  19. JT'sDad

    JT'sDad Member

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    I will be pig hunting/pig hiking tomorrow morning. I use my 20ga 870 with rifled slugs. We hunt brush and I shoot pigs 50yds in and closer.
    .357 magnum with 180 gr hardcast would be fine to use as well. kanook- great pig diagram.
     
  20. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    .357 Magnum will be fine especially loaded with ammo built with a hard cast 180gr gas checked bullet from Cast Performance.
     
  21. jackslayer

    jackslayer Member

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    Thanks to all of you for your input. Looks like a rifle would do a better job. I have a contact to hunt on private land and so that's not a problem. It looks like I may be better off just investing in a rifle. Would a .223 really be sufficient? If so I'd gladly use this as my excuse to get a Cal legal AR. I only ask this because someone said they saw 3 taken with a .223. Kinda in a tough spot to make a decision because I can only afford to buy maybe one gun in the near future and I want to make sure that it covers as many bases as possible. I know that will almost guarantee that I make compromises but that's just the way it is.
     
  22. Marshall

    Marshall Member

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    One gun?

    A 30-30 is a great all around "one gun".

    Also, it's pretty cool to have a rifle chambered the same as your sidearm. Example: .357 Mag, .44 Mag.

    Whatever you end up doing, good luck on your hunt!
     
  23. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    A levergun isn't a bad idea at all. The 30-30 will take even the bigger pigs easily. I have 3 leverguns, one in 30-30 another in .357 Magnum and the last is in .22 LR. (it's a Henry)
     
  24. DWFan

    DWFan Member

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    A .357 Magnum lever-action with 158gr Buffalo Bore ammo and a .30-30 with most factory ammo are nearly identical in power. The .30-30 will shoot flatter and farther due to the smaller diameter bullet. The Hornady .30-30 LEVERevolution has more velocity, but I've seen reports of over-pressure signs in some weapons.
    http://www.buffalobore.com/index.php?l=product_detail&p=102
    In a revolver, the "heavy" loads (180-200gr) from Buffalo Bore, CorBon or Double Tap will work as long as the nasty isn't too big. If you aren't revolver proficient or don't have plenty of time and ammo to practice with; I'd suggest going to a long-gun or using the 12ga. I don't recommend a .223 even though it's been used by some.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2010
  25. Franco2shoot

    Franco2shoot Member

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    I'm more interested in the second part of your question as to where to place the shot. A well placed Heart or Lung shot will bring the beast down, but you may have to do some serious tracking to find the animal. On the other hand, a .357 round behind or through the lug holes will drop anything like a stone. I don't understand why WhiteTail aren't taken this way, be it powder of Bow.

    KKKKFL
     
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