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.357 lever

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by lebowski, Sep 30, 2010.

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  1. lebowski

    lebowski Member

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  2. W.E.G.

    W.E.G. Member

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    If iron sights are your thing, that should do quite nicely.
     
  3. bikerdoc

    bikerdoc Moderator Staff Member

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    Make mine Marlin.
     
  4. easy

    easy Member

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    Marlin. Better gun.
     
  5. PT1911

    PT1911 Member

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    for a 357.... I would go 92... Lighter, shorter, and... prettier...

    Marlin if you want to scope it.
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2010
  6. Jeff H

    Jeff H Member

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  7. 76shuvlinoff

    76shuvlinoff Member

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    As far as shorter, lighter and prettier goes, 1977 Marlin 1894c here and it would take some doing to talk me out of it.
     
  8. CraigC
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    CraigC Member

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    Hardly! The Winchester is a "better" gun, lighter in weight, stronger and a more refined design. The Marlin is simply more affordable. The late model 1892's, as well as every other offering made by Miroku, are better-built leverguns than anything produced domestically in at least the last half century.
     
  9. Kymasabe

    Kymasabe Member

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    You'd be hard pressed to find a better gun than the Marlin.
    Good friend of mine has been hog hunting with his for years. Reliable and accurate.
     
  10. Snakum

    Snakum Member

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    I called my dealer just today to price a Rossi 92 in .357 for plinking and maybe some cowboy shooting. $400 plus NC taxes ain't bad. The general consensus is that the Rossi is perfectly serviceable and reliable, and pretty accurate for what it is.

    But if I had the money, I'd be getting a Marlin instead. I have looked closely at the Marlins and the Winchesters and read everything I could find on them. And the general consensus is that the Marlin is beefier and more robust.
     
  11. lebowski

    lebowski Member

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    This gun will be iron sights only.

    Pretty and good fit and finish is just as if not more important as shootability, for this purchase (in most cases my priorities are the other way around)

    Do the '92 and the Marlin both shoot .38 special?
     
  12. Jeff H

    Jeff H Member

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    The 1892's do and do it well. Its like shooting a 22 when you use 38 spec. 357 step it up a couple of notches
     
  13. c919

    c919 Member

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    I'd go with a Win. 94 Trapper personally. If not that, it'd be a Marlin.

    Those would be my top choices, but Henry and Rossi both make great one's as well.
     
  14. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Member

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    My Marlin 1894C handles .38 Specials and even .357 Magnum wadcutters (they are shorter than typical .38 Specials) just fine. It will not feed .38 Special wadcutters.

    You'll need to pick one load and adjust your sights though; going back and forth between .38's and .357's changes the POI quite a bit.
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2010
  15. CraigC
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    CraigC Member

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    The Marlin may be beefier, because it is slightly larger and heavier, but the 1892 is simply a stronger design due to its large vertical locking lugs. This is well-proven and well-known. In the bigger chamberings, the Marlin is safe only to about 40,000psi, while the 1892 is the only action smaller than the 1886 that is strong enough for the .454Casull cartridge.
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2010
  16. MCMXI

    MCMXI Member

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    If the Marlin is strong enough, which it is, how is this even relevant?! The 1894 comes in .45 Colt and .44 Magnum chamberings as well, so the action strength isn't an issue at all.

    lebowski, check out the 1894CSS. It's the stainless version and it's a great rifle. I bought one earlier this year. Add a Wild West trigger and some decent sights such as those offered by Skinner and you'll be one happy camper.

    :)
     
  17. CraigC
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    CraigC Member

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    It may or may not be relevant. I simply supply the facts and the OP can make his decision based on them.

    In this particular chambering, it is not really an issue. Maybe you should actually read what I responded to. Snakum posted, "...the general consensus is that the Marlin is beefier and more robust", which implies that the Marlin is the stronger of the two. Which is completely untrue. This is not a difference of opinion, we cannot agree to disagree, it is undeniable fact. I really could care less which is chosen because both are wonderful rifles. I own multiple examples of each. But if a feller is gonna make a decision based in part on what's posted here, the information should at least be correct. Particularly since in the future folks will be searching and find this thread, possibly thinking of another chambering in which the strength would an issue and be completely misled by what was posted. Because the 1892 is 50% stronger than the Marlin and THAT matters if you're hotrodding a .45Colt.
     
  18. PAPACHUCK

    PAPACHUCK Member

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    When I was looking for a 357 lever gun, I looked hard at the Marlin. It would be my first choice, if it were available in a 16" barrel, and was a couple hundred $ less.

    So I picked this one, and it's a winner. Light, handy, affordable, reliable, and just plain fun. My 9yr old granddaughter loves shooting it with .38's, it is just like shooting a .22 rifle. With full power .357's, it's still not bad.

    [​IMG]

    GIT-U-1 !
     
  19. Abel

    Abel Member

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    Its not better, its just a little different. You try taking a winny apart in the field and then tell me with a straight face that its better.
     
  20. RevDerb

    RevDerb Member

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    I have a Marlin 1894 chambered in .357 and it is the most accurate of my lever guns. Or at least I shoot it most accurately of the three. Owned a Winchester 94 in .30-30 once and there was no problem with it either.
     
  21. sansone

    sansone Member

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    marlin 1894c was one of the best rifles on my list of guns I should have kept :D .. really shined when I reloaded some slower burning rifle powder for it. somebody gave me a dumptruck full of money for it.. mistake selling it :scrutiny:
     
  22. CraigC
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    CraigC Member

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    It is better. It's better in every way. Fit and finish are FAR superior to any Marlin of recent production. Which tend to be a little rough. It's a more compact and refined design. It's lighter and more comfortable to carry. The Miroku guns are simply higher in qualty, which is good because they cost quite a bit more.

    Again, there is no reason to get defensive. I'm not crapping on Marlin. I own several and they are wonderful. My 1894S is one of the most accurate rifles I own and great hog medicine. They're a great value but just not up to the quality standards of the Miroku guns, period. They are beautifully made rifles.

    Oh and let me count the number of times I've needed to disassemble ANY rifle in the field.......zero.

    Let me also count the number of times I needed to disassemble a Winchester and had any difficulty whatsoever.........zero.
     
  23. LeverGunJunkie

    LeverGunJunkie Member

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    I've been a Winny guy since I could hold a gun, but the Marlin is the best overall value in this case. I love mine with XS sights. It has become my go to levergun for any woods walking I do. There is absolutely no reason to pay a grand for a 357MAG lever gun, as long as the Marlin 1894C is around.
     
  24. CraigC
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    CraigC Member

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    That's a matter of preference and depends entirely on what appeals to you and what's important to you. Marlins are great rifles and a good value but there are those of us who like to enjoy the finer things in life and are willing to pay for it. The $900 you'd spend on that Winchester does get you more. Whether or not you appreciate what it has to offer or are willing to pay for it is another matter entirely and strictly personal.
     
  25. LubeckTech

    LubeckTech Member

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    I have a Rossi in .44mag which is a good gun but has a "gritty" feeling action. If I had it to do over I would go with a marlin as the ones I have shot have been smoother and Marlins are drilled and tapped for a scope. From my experience the Marlins have a better fit and finish BUT a stainless Rossi can be had for around $450 and with a little work can be made into an outstanding gun. If you are mechanically inclined (or have a friend who is)you can slick up a Rossi pretty without much trouble. There are several good resources on how to do this on the net as the Rossis are pretty common in the cowboy action world. Before I would pay $900 for a Winchester I would buy a Rossi and have it slicked up, trigger job and a short action kit installed - you should be able to have all of that done by a good gunsmith for less than a Winchester and probably have a better gun.
     
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