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.357 mag vs .357 sig chronograph results

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by dodo bird, May 27, 2020.

  1. fxvr5

    fxvr5 Member

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    Recoil. See Newton's third law.
     
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  2. WrongHanded
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    WrongHanded Contributing Member

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    Yeah, I was thinking about it last night, and it now seems obvious. I don't know why I though pressure was involved in moving the slide, but I did.
     
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  3. WrongHanded
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    WrongHanded Contributing Member

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    Quoting myself here. That can't be accurate.

    Pressure is involved, and is a major component in what is happening. It's is what provides the energy. And the slide must at least begin to move before the bullet exits the barrel, because if it doesn't, there's no energy left for the slide to move once the bullet is out of the barrel and the pressure gone. Recoil doesn't just happen afterward.

    Recoil is happening as soon as the bullet begins to move, but the mass of the bullet is far less than the mass of the slide. The slide mass coupled with the spring tension is far more inertia to overcome, than bullet weight alone. Although considering how much harder it is to push a bullet down a barrel than rack a slide, it's not as much of a difference as it might seem.

    So, I think the slide must begin to move before the bullet leaves the barrel. Spring weight being the controlling factor of how much or how little it moves before the bullet exits (when using a certain and particular load). But it shouldn't be moving enough to have too much of an effect on a loss of pressure and lose of velocity for the bullet. Though perhaps just a little.
     
  4. fxvr5

    fxvr5 Member

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  5. fxvr5

    fxvr5 Member

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  6. WrongHanded
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    WrongHanded Contributing Member

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    Thanks! So the slide and barrel are moving rearward together. The bullet is exerting forward force on the barrel, and rearward force on the slide at the breech face. But in a locked breech design, for the period of time these forces appose each other, this joint...
    IMG_20200531_094848276.jpg

    ...stops the barrel and slide moving in opposite directions, right? It's only at the instance the bullet loses friction and therefore the application of forward force upon the barrel, that the barrel and the slide can begin to unlock.

    This has been very educational.
     
  7. SwampWolf

    SwampWolf Member

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    Regarding the bottle-neck configuration that the .357 SIG has, I recall having read a few opinions that it has an inherent propensity to feed more reliably from magazine to chamber than typical straight wall-cases do (whether, if true, that's a "practical" advantage or not is hard to say but anything that contributes to the reliability of a firearm intended for self-defense is always a plus).
     
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  8. WrongHanded
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    WrongHanded Contributing Member

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    I think it makes a match grade barrel in a Self Defense gun a more reliable proposal. I have one in a G23 and G22. Flawless reliability thus far.
     
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