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.357 Sig Case Resizing

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by WrongHanded, Nov 7, 2020.

  1. WrongHanded
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    WrongHanded Contributing Member

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    I'm wondering if anyone else has notice this (not that there's many of us reloading .357 Sig).

    New Starling brass appears to have the case shoulder closer to the head (therefore farther from the mouth) than my case gauge suggests it should be. This means more neck, and the possibility for more next tension. They still chamber and fire just fine like this. Likely because the case with seat of either the mouth or the shoulder, based on which one hits first in the chamber.

    When I resize fired brass, I set the shoulder so the case fits the go/no-go case gauge, but between the powder residue coating the inside of the neck (despite tumbling it's never like new), residual case lube, and the reduced neck length, I tend to see prefired cases are more likely to suffer bullet setback.

    I'm wondering if maybe resizing the shoulder farther towards the case head is a better way to go. However, I realize this may cause the case to wear more quickly at the shoulder. Any thought or experience with this?
     
  2. JPIMBO

    JPIMBO Member

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    Very interesting thought about the powder residue in the neck even on my 40. Always so tight after bullet seating.
     
  3. WrongHanded
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    WrongHanded Contributing Member

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    Actually, what I've noticed with the residue on prefired cases (including .357, .41, and. 44 mag) is that bullets seat just a little easier than with new brass. In fact, I had some coated lead bullets that I loaded into new brass, and saw the coating breaking off from friction even with a good flare to the mouth. No such issue with prefired though. It's been my experience that the residue makes the inside of the case slightly slick.
     
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  4. JPIMBO

    JPIMBO Member

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    Sizing my bullets is one thing but I think that extra thickness may contribute to the carts to be a little too big for the gauge sometimes. But your right the residue is a smooth lube plus the stretch of the case mouth helps a little. They don’t anneal new pistol brass. Do you size your coated bullets after coating?
     
  5. WrongHanded
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    WrongHanded Contributing Member

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    I don't cast my own. I just buy from SNS, MBC, or similar places.
     
  6. cfullgraf

    cfullgraf Member

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    I've never put my 357 Sig cases in a case gauge so I cannot comment there.

    I do load some 357 Sig for a S&W M&P and a Sig 1911 but also load 38/45 Clerke in 1911's. I set the sizing dies to touch the shell holder. I do not find the shoulder for either case to be set back excessively to cause feeding or headspace issues, or case life issues.

    Neck tension is more important for me, there needs to be enough to prevent bullet set back under feeding.
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2020
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  7. vaalpens

    vaalpens Member

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    It does not seem SAAMI gives much wiggle room from the head to the shoulder. What are the measurements?
    saami_357sig.PNG
     
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  8. JPIMBO

    JPIMBO Member

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    ever tried precision bullets? Black or red- concave base. They have a few different weights. Hope I didn’t do something bad here.
     
  9. WrongHanded
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    WrongHanded Contributing Member

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    Somewhat hard to accurately measure, though it seems to be fairly close. However, here are some pics of a resized case with my case gauge.
    IMG_20201108_082126175.jpg IMG_20201108_082047085.jpg IMG_20201108_082036564.jpg

    And here are the same shots with a piece of new brass.

    IMG_20201108_081907877.jpg IMG_20201108_081854980.jpg IMG_20201108_081839619.jpg

    Comparing the two directly, things don't look very different. But the gauge tells a slightly different story.

    I decided to adjust my resizing die. It's bottomed out now and reads between the two. Perhaps that will work a little better, but it should work at least as well as how I've been resizing up until now.
     
  10. packetloss

    packetloss Member

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    I've never had an issue with lube or residue on .357sig cases. If you aren't wet tumbling you should. Not just because they look clean, but because it gets rid of all the lead dust that you don't want to breath and get all over everything. Every single one of my once fired 357 sig brass seems to headspace on the case mouth. I use the smallest bell possible so that the bullets just barely sit on them before seating and haven't had issues with setback. Some folks don't even bell, but instead chamfer the mouth. Not sure I'd recommend that unless you are having setback issues that you can't seem to solve.
     
  11. WrongHanded
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    WrongHanded Contributing Member

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    I'm dry tumbling, and probably won't be changing that any time soon. Unfortunately. But that is likely part of the issue.
     
  12. packetloss

    packetloss Member

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    Just make sure to tumble them outside and you should wear a P100 rated mask when dealing with the media or putting cases in it or taking them out.
     
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  13. kcofohio
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    kcofohio Contributing Member

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    I have tried coated bullets yet. May have to try, just for curiosity. :)
     
  14. WrongHanded
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    WrongHanded Contributing Member

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    Just to be clear, when I was talking about coated bullets, that was for the magnum cartridges. With .357 Sig I only use copper jacketed (or just recently, solid copper).
     
  15. WrongHanded
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    WrongHanded Contributing Member

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    Interesting. I don't remember hearing much about that until now. But perhaps I should look into wet tumbling.
     
  16. packetloss

    packetloss Member

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  17. cfullgraf

    cfullgraf Member

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    Dry tumble cases with the lid in the tumbler. Use a bit of a liquid car polish like Nu Finish which will bind up the dust and the dust will not be an issue.

    Don’t get crazy with the polish as it will load up the media such that it won’t work and leave black tar like smudges on your cases.

    Importantly, do wash your hands after handling cases out of the mefia.

    Run the tumbler out doors and use PPEs if you fell more comfortable.
     
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  18. WrongHanded
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    WrongHanded Contributing Member

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    I certainly had been washing my hands. After every aspect of reloading.

    The lid on my tumbler has slots in it. So on my way home I bought a big plastic tote (with lid) to put the whole tumbler inside.

    I'm also going to stop using the center hub of the tumbler to vibrate media out of the cases as I pull them out. I'd been doing this since I began reloading a few years ago - lightly holding each case upside down whilst pressed to the hub - and obviously the tumbler has to be on for the vibrations to help, which means dust. I'll do it differently from now on, and I'll get some car polish too.

    Thanks to everyone looking out for my health. :)
     
  19. cfullgraf

    cfullgraf Member

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    If the company that makes your tumbler does not offer a solid lid, get some duct tape or masking tape to close up the slots. The motor probably would like to circulate fresh air to help it stay cool.

    There are other ways to separate the media from the cases than pouring it through a slotted lid.
     
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