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.375 h&h

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by andrewdl007, Sep 1, 2012.

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  1. andrewdl007

    andrewdl007 Member

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    Have any of you hunted with or shot the .375 H&H? What did you use it on? What rife do you have it chambered in? I just want some opinions on the .375 besides what I can read on google. Thanks.
     
  2. Robert

    Robert Administrator Staff Member

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    I will be using my Winchester M70 Safari Express in a few months for elk here in Colorado. The scope and rifle weigh in at about 9.5 lbs. Not too bad and helps keep the recoil down. Though it is not too bad to start with.

    If you hand load you can load it as mild or wild as you like. One world, one cartridge.
     
  3. finnwolf64

    finnwolf64 Member

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    I purchased a CZ in .375 H&H Magnum a few months ago. I have been hunting with centerfire rifles such as .308's & 30-06's for over 30 years & I wasn't too concerned by the recoil, but I also wouldn't recommend a .375 H&H for a beginner.
    I have used a .375 H&H in Africa on plains game on past hunting trips. The rifles I used in Africa were a heavy Barrel Remington, which didn't kick much at all due to its weight, & a Whitworth Interarms .375 H&H that was fitted with a muzzle brake. I didn't like the deafening blast associated with the muzzle brake, & definately preferred the heavier rifle for shooting.
    I mainly bought the CZ for use in controlling feral goats & pigs on my 3,500 acres. I also own a number of other firearms, but there is something satisfying firing 300 grain bullets around the countryside.
    First day at the range, I put 40 rounds of factory ammo through the .375 off the bench, & I felt it the next day. Since then I've mainly hunted with it, & from field positions I don't fee the recoil.(much)
    I haven't yet taken my .375 out to the mountains where I hunt deer, but I will be. I'll probably still take my Sako .308 & just use the .375 occassionally for hunting in the mountains, as one disadvantage of the .375 in the weight of the rifle. That said, I would still rather have a heavier .375 H&H that I enjoy shooting, rather than a lightweight .375 that would lead to flinching.
     
  4. H&Hhunter

    H&Hhunter Moderator

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    I have been shooting and hunting with the .375H&H for years. I've killed piles of elk and a few deer and caribou with mine. I've killed hundreds upon hundreds of feral hogs with it, coyotes, jack rabbits, cape buffalo and plains game to include but not limited to kudu, impala, zebra, warthog, gemsbok, wildebeest (Blue and black), blessbok and I'm sure others that I can't remember right now.

    The longest shot I've ever made on an elk was at 443 yards with that .375 H&H. It truly is one of the most versatile round sin the world. I find the recoil to be very modest in a properly weighted H&H say about 8.5 lbs and up. The .375H&H is a fantastic gun for small stature folks such as ladies and children who are hunting dangerous game. If you can shoot a .338 or a .300 Wm you shouldn't have any issues with a .375H&H.
     
  5. Robert

    Robert Administrator Staff Member

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    If you can shoot a 12 ga you can shoot a 375H&H. In a proper weighted rifle recoil is not bad at all.
     
  6. Grumulkin

    Grumulkin Member

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    The 375 H&H Magnum is a great cartridge. I've used it in various versions for various things.
     
  7. Patocazador

    Patocazador Member

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    When I went to Africa I found out that the locals consider the .375 H&H their "small" cartridge. I used a modified Karamojo Bell cartridge (7x57 Imp. with Nosler Partitions) to take 13 animals - all plains game, no big stuff. When I got home I bought a Rem 700 Safari grade in .375 H&H but when I tried to sight it in off a bench rest, I found I couldn't handle the recoil. I've never used it on a hunt but it sure is pretty.
     
  8. RhinoDefense

    RhinoDefense Member

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    Had a CZ 550 Magnum in .375 Holland. Also a TC Encore pistol in the same. Took all manner of game with jacketed and cast bullet loads. Does less meat damage to thin skinned game (deer) than a .270 Winchester. One of those "eat right up to the hole" cartridges. I shot a few deer with jacketed bullets, but moved on to cast only for deer. Nice and soft 12 BHN 265gr FN at 2000fps doesn't exit and mushrooms very well. Recover the bullet and melt it down to cast another. I believe in recycling! :)
     
  9. janobles14

    janobles14 Member

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    damn, i have to get an encore! wanted one for years!!!! this may have just convinced me!
     
  10. cooch

    cooch Member

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    I carry a Browning A-Bolt in .375 into the hills after Sambar.

    As noted by others, it's a bit of a chore to shoot off the bench, so I use a shooting jacket and some extra padding. Bench work is about accuracy, not machismo.

    When shooting "for blood", the recoil is hardly felt.

    Let a couple of lads try it who had little or no experience with anything larger than a .308. They hit the things that they were aiming at and commented that, offhand, the recoil was less than they had expected, and quite manageable.
     
  11. Grumulkin

    Grumulkin Member

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    Encore375Target.jpg

    Just to add to your lust. Shot with my Encore handgun at 200 yards.

    Just a caution about the rifle version; the Encore rifle stock configuration makes it VERY easy to get a scope bite so be careful and use a scope with good eye relief. Also, felt recoil in an Encore rifle is a bit more than you'll get with many other types of rifle stocks.
     
  12. rodinal220

    rodinal220 Member

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    Sako Finnbear in .375 H&H. Great old cartridge that gets the job done.Very versatile cartridge,especially if you hand load. I mostly use my .375 as an elk,moose,bear gun, but you can really do anything with it by hand loading.

    My Sako is very accurate and not too bad to shoot,its more of a big push than a sharp jolt like some of the .300 mag type guns Ive shot,stock fit is key.
    I'm glad I bought a .375 H&H and would do so again,at the time I almost bought the Remington 8mm mag(great cartridge),but it didn't sell well,bought the Sako in .375.
     
  13. MachIVshooter

    MachIVshooter Member

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    The .375 H&H is a great round. I personally opted for the .375 Ultra mag, a choice which proved a little less practical for North American hunting, as it is unneccesarily powerful for any species here and has feirce recoil when fired from my 7-1/2 pound 700 BDL SS. The RUM is about 30% more powerful than the H&H with top loads in each. My reason for getting it was really for hunting Cape buffalo one day, if I can ever afford to go.

    The .375 H&H wil have stout recoil from a standard 7-8 lb sporter, but it's relatively low pressure/velocity means the impulse is not nearly as sharp as the RUM or similar. Not something you'll want to plink away with, but it shouldn't leave you black and blue after use in the field. It's only real downside is a rather poor trajectory on account of it's lower velocity, but that is something you can account for, and those big pills will hit with authority at any practical range.

    I decided for North American big game that the 8mm Rem Mag would be a better choice for me, but part of that decision was the fact that I already had the .375 Ultra. The .375 H&H is about the best choice for anyone who wants a good all-purpose medium bore rifle, especially if you don't handload, as there is a very good selection of factory ammo for it.
     
  14. jdh

    jdh Member

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    375 turns 100 this year.

    Mine is an Interarms Mark X with Leupold M8-3X. Never know when hogzilla is going present for a good shot.
     
  15. Dr.Rob

    Dr.Rob Moderator Staff Member

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    I have a stainless Savage 116 safari express in 375 H&H. It's a heavy rifle but like others have said that tames the recoil down. None of the 'big' rifles are much fun to shoot off the bench. I have mine topped with a Burris 1.5-6x scope.
     
  16. win71

    win71 Member

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    Colt Sauer 375h&h with a leica 2-7 in QD mounts. The rifle has iron sights.
     
  17. wmitty

    wmitty Member

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    .375

    I've a post '64 M 70 and a 700 Remington chambered for this round. I'd suggest a controlled round feed action if you are hunting something dangerous. I bought the Win. in '72 as a kid and was promptly told by the gunsmith I hung around that I'd never learn to shoot it 'till I started casting boolets and shooting reduced loads in it. He was right. I built the 700 by swapping barrels and it's what I shoot now. The Win. extractor is chipped and won't extract a round; second time this has happened with this rifle.
     
  18. Kyle M.

    Kyle M. Member

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    I haven't shot one yet but I just picked up a ruger #1 in .375 H&H and I plan to shoot it for the first time tomorrow.
     
  19. Craigman

    Craigman Member

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    I picked up a push feed 1969 Model 70 this spring. I replaced the hard rubber orange recoil pad with a Decelerator and it made a world of difference. I an shooting the 235gn Speer's on deer this fall and the sharp kick was almost too much. The new pad really makes it feel like a "push" now.
     
  20. Kyle M.

    Kyle M. Member

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    Well now that I've shot my ruger no. 1 a little more, what I can say is it kick it kicks hard, but it's not so bad that it's umcomfortable. It's also not bad enough to keep me from shooting it well. All in all I really enjoy this rifle.
     
  21. Swampman

    Swampman Old Fart

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    I've shot numerous hogs, two whitetail does, a skunk and an outhouse (the last two with the same shot!) with a buddy's Ruger #1, .375 H&H. I really like the caliber and honestly, it doesn't feel like it kicks as hard as my Ruger M77 in .338 Win Mag. The .375 definitely moves you around more, but it seems like more of a shove than a sharp kick.

    While the #1 is a great feeling rifle with excellent accuracy, I honestly don't think a single shot is the best venue for the caliber. If I had to go after a wounded grizzly in the alders, I'd feel more comfortable knowing I had additional rounds at the ready if needed.

    Keep in mind that when used for light game, most factory loads have bullets that are too "hard" for optimal performance. I like the 200 grain Sierra Pro Hunter (meant for the .375 Winchester) loaded to about 2700 fps for deer and hogs.

    For skunks I recommend a short barreled pump or semi auto 12 gauge, it might be hard on the outhouse, but remember, a skunk is just about the only animal out there that can shoot back!
     
  22. brnmuenchow

    brnmuenchow Member

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    Aside from my .45-70 Gov't. the .375 H&H Mag. is one of my favorite big game rifle cartridges I would suggest trying the Federal 300 gr. Barnes "Cape-Shok" Banded Solid or the 250 gr. "Vital-Shok" Trophy Bonded Bear Claw all depends on what you may be hunting. The Winchester Model 70 "Safari" with a Zeiss scope of your choosing and you can't go wrong.
     
  23. MachIVshooter

    MachIVshooter Member

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    There is nothing in North America that requires a 300 gr. Solid. 235, 250, 260 and 270 gr. expanding bullets will cover any species found here.

    I have 3 loads I use for my .375 RUM: A 250 gr. Sierra Gameking @ 3,155FPS, a 260 gr. Ballistic tip @ 3,080 FPS and a 300 gr. Gameking @ 2,970 FPS. The 300 grain load I have never actually used while hunting, though. I will if I go after big stuff in Alaska.
     
  24. H&Hhunter

    H&Hhunter Moderator

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    A good controlled expansion bullet in a 270 gr will handle anything in Alaska too. i use the 300 gr bullets in Africa and that is it unless I'm hunting plains game then I use the 270.
     
  25. brnmuenchow

    brnmuenchow Member

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    I guess if you really want to get technical there is really nothing in North America that requires the use of a .375 H&H Mag. either..... just saying. I was simply giving a suggestion and I typically like to give more than one, that is all. I also do not really remember the origional poster stating what he or she was hunting inquiry wise so for all I know they could be hunting a Cape Buffalo.:neener:
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2012
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