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4 gun hunting battery (not including rimfires)

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by Jason_W, Jan 19, 2013.

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  1. Girodin

    Girodin Member

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    If I were only going to have four. First of all I'd be very sad, then I'd get the following:

    Before I give my list I'd like to outline my general underlining approach to my choices. In any king of one gun decision one must almost necessarily look to a compromise gun. That is to say a gun that must be able to do many things acceptably well, but as a result tends to not be the very best choice for anyone one task. Alternatively one can pick a gun that does specialize in what he or she will use it for the most and then accept its shortcomings in other areas. Lastly, if I am only going to own one gun I'm going to go all out so to speak. I would certainly want a very high quality gun and might be less concerned with price. I'd also like something kind of neat that offered "pride of ownership" if it is going to be the only one I have. I blend these approaches in my choices, sometimes opting for the generalist and sometimes picking a specialist because that is what I realistically would use the gun for most of the time.

    The List:

    1.Caesar Guerini Ellipse EVO 12 guage Shotgun

    [​IMG]

    I was tempted to pick a Benelli auto loader as a gun that could do it all from clays, to upland game, to water foul and Turkey. However, what I like to hunt the most is upland game, pheasants in particular. As such, I'd get a gun primarily for that. If I'm only going to have one shotgun, a nice O/U seems to be fitting. The Caesar Guerini Apex Sporting is not cheap. However, it is very well made, a great shooter and simply a gorgeous gun. Budget choice would be a browing Citori.

    2. Custom .22-250 with a Schimt and Bender Scope. I would need a Varmint gun. I would be very torn between a Larue OBR and a custom 22-250 bolt gun. Most of my hunting would be for yotes or jackrabbits. I'd probably get the 22-250 simply because I love the cartridge and have some what of an emotional attachment to it as well, my father used to hunt with one and it was the gun he taught me to shoot and hunt with. The scope is really needed because yotes are often hunted when the light is low. Plus if one is only going to have a couple rifles there is no reason not to have really good glass on them.

    3. Pre 64 Winchester M70 in 30'06 with a Schimt and Bender scope. My NA big game rifle This was my grandpa's deer gun. It is still very adequate for everything I have ever hunted and the vast majority of what I am likely to ever hunt. Although there are newer, fancier, more wiz bang, calibers and guns this will realistically do everything or very nearly everything I need a big game rifle. Plus its was my grandpa's (although if I was starting from scratch I'd be really tempted to get a 6.5x55 Swede).

    4. An M70 Chambered in 375 H&H for a Big/Dangerous game rifle. Some day I might choose to go hunt in Africa or hunt big bears or the like in NA. This gun would cover anything I might ever hunt. Plus I just have always thought they were neat guns. I could use it on Elk etc, and not feel absurd. When I get serious about buying one of these I may choose a different rifle when I really research it out we will see.
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2013
  2. lefteyedom

    lefteyedom Member

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    12 gauge, 3 barrels, rifle slug, 20" and 26" both with screw in choke.
    223. varmint rifle
    260 deer rifle, 20" barrel compact
    300 win mag for everything else
     
  3. Ole Humpback

    Ole Humpback Member

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    I was actually looking at rifles chambered for 9.3x74R. I didn't know other chamberings existed in 9.3.

    I didn't know that Husqvarna was that good. The last time I saw a Husqvarna gun was at a tractor supply a few years ago and it both looked an felt cheap for even a single shot 12ga.

    Learned something that is both new & useful. Definitely more food for thought here.

    Let me clarify my DG hunting desires. I only had a cape buffalo hunt in mind for DG and thats it as those are about the only types of hunts I can see myself both doing and being able to afford. I have no desire to hunt elephant, lion, rino, or any of the other DG species. Too rich for my blood.

    Also, a 375 is about the largest gun I can handle. No point in having a larger more powerful rifle that I know I can't handle or shoot well.
     
  4. Jason_W

    Jason_W Member

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    Ballistically speaking, I agree. That being said, I do have a considerable supply of powder, primers, and components leftover from the last time I owned a .44. That's part of my reason for wanting one. Additionally, A handloader can make some .44 loads that are actually fun to shoot. It's hard to make a 12 ga slug load that won't get old real fast.

    For longer range stuff, I wish I could just stick with the .308. It's probably good for everything in Maine and I already have a gun chambered in it. I just have a feeling it will be a few years (if ever) before ammo and components for the common rounds is easy to come by.
     
  5. witchhunter

    witchhunter Member

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    I love this stuff! There are so many variables, here you go though.
    Remington 870 12 gauge with two barrels, one slugger and one with tubes.
    Bolt guns of your choice in:
    .223 or .22/250
    .30/06 or 7mm Mag
    .375 H&H or .338 WM
    That would cover just about anything except a .22
     
  6. txcookie

    txcookie Member

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    Little Rock AFB
    270 win for elk and down
    30.06 for everything
    remington 870 for everything that flys
    223 for fun and carmints

    if you wanted a pistol through in the 9mm and remove the 223
     
  7. T.R.

    T.R. Member

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    Location:
    Manatee County, Florida
    - Marlin 30-30 for deer in the forests & foothills
    - Savage .308 for large game
    - CVA Optima 50 caliber ML for restricted zones
    - TC flintlock in 45 caliber for late season deer
     
  8. Deer_Freak

    Deer_Freak Member.

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    I am making this selection based on the availability of ammo. There seems to be plenty of 270 ammo on the market. The 270 is more versatile than a 243. The OP can go to Walmart and get a Ruger American for $350 chambered in 270. I don't see how he can go wrong unless he is recoil sensitive. A 270 does kick like a mule.
     
  9. cal30_sniper

    cal30_sniper Member

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    I've never really heard anybody say that before. My .270 certainly doesn't kick like a mule, and it doesn't even have a recoil pad. It's a bit more stout than my 7x57, but not anything like my .30-06 or 7mm Rem Mag kicked (in heavier rifles with recoil pads, nonetheless).
     
  10. HankB

    HankB Member

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    A four-gun hunting battery . . .

    1. 12 ga shotgun. Benelli M1S90. Just fine for anything that requires either birdshot or slugs.

    2. .223 for varmints. A good AR-pattern rifle is more accurate than all but the very best bolt action rifles, and if it won't reach out like a 22/250 or .22 Swift, it won't burn out the barrel as quick either, and it can be fired faster.

    3. .30/06. An old standby, very common, this round is a good choice for all thin-skinned, non-dangerous game worldwide with the possible exception of giraffe and eland.

    4. .375 H&H. Many elephants have fallen to this round, and unless you're an African PH or plan to hunt many elephants, this is a great choice.
     
  11. RonDeer10mm

    RonDeer10mm Member

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    .35 whelen
     
  12. Jason_W

    Jason_W Member

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    Now I'm eyeing the 6.5x55 as my longer range choice. I used to have a sporterized M38 that I foolishly sold during a bout of youthful shortsightedness. From what I remember, the round outperforms what anything that light-kicking should.

    It's more than moose capable with the right loads and the chances of me getting to hunt anything larger elsewhere are pretty much nil for the foreseeable future. Also, it doesn't take a .308 dia. bullet which is an advantage during panic times.

    It's a good thing I don't actually have money right now. Otherwise, my indecisiveness would really be annoying.
     
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