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.40 range brass ID

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by kennedy, Jan 29, 2008.

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  1. kennedy

    kennedy Member

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    picked up a bunch of .40 range brass, what does the firing pin hole look like from a glock? some of the brass have a round hole, some a rectangular and some a rounded triangle, almost tear drop shape. my smith and EAA witness leave a round hole.
     
  2. CZ57

    CZ57 member

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    Round is how it should look. The "rounded triangle" or "tear drop" shapes are from pistol's that unlock prematurely and cause "primer smear." The rectangular is from a Glock, and I discard it. You will also notice a bulge near the casehead (near the rim) in many cases. Also, since Glocks don't come with relieved ejection ports, there is usually a triangular shaped scar on the casemouth where the case struck the slide (ejection port) when it ejected.

    Some reloaders feel safe firing lighter handloads through their Glocks and that's totally up to them. When I pick up .40 S&W brass that's been fired from a Glock, it goes into the recycle bin.;)
     
  3. Grandpa Shooter

    Grandpa Shooter Member

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    I have been reloading brass for years that has been "glocked". Never had a problem yet. Knock on wooden head:D
     
  4. The Bushmaster

    The Bushmaster Member

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    As long as Glocked brass does not deform when being resized, it's O K...
     
  5. CZ57

    CZ57 member

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    You would think. The problem is that if the case has bulged, all you can do is return it to normal appearance. This does not change the fact that the brass has been pre-stressed. If the stressed area gets chambered in the 6 O'Clock position again in a chamber of questionable support, a Ka-Boom event is possible.;)
     
  6. dakotasin

    dakotasin Member

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    not true... i fire full-power loads through my glock regardless of how many times the brass has been glocked.
     
  7. evan price

    evan price Member

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    I have never had this happen and my brother uses a .40 with whatever brass I supply him. The resizing dies should not only resize, but the material which is moved during sizing also re-densifies the case walls. The metal goes somewhere!

    As long as you are not pushing the .40 to its max and above with your loads, you'll have no problems loading reputable brass with reputable loads.
     
  8. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    If I pick up .40 brass that is visibly bulged more than I am comfortable with, I toss it in the scrap bucket. Too much .40 brass laying around where I shoot to be picky. I don't shoot much .40 so I will never run out. Besides, a kind gentleman gave be some .40 as well, so I am good to go. AC
     
  9. lee n. field

    lee n. field Member

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    A big rectangular impression. It will be obvious.
     
  10. Shoney

    Shoney Member

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    When the 40SW was introduced in January 1990, Glock and SW pistiols were first on the market. The Glock became more popular initially, and for years Glocked brass represented the majority of once fired brass on the market, probably because of the high percentage of law enforcement practice ammo cases being resold. A simple fact of life, early on, was that if you wanted to reload, you were going to have to do it with Glocked brass.

    The Glocked brass was very evident. I was very leary of it, and never loaded max loads, only middle range ammo. When my Glocked cases started getting into the 15-20 reload range, I stopped worrying.
     
  11. CZ57

    CZ57 member

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    The way I look at it, it may have never happened to you and it may never happen. The fact remains that it has happened. Every load guide or manual that you pick up today will have a warning about .40 S&W reloads in pistols without adequate chamber support. This is not a Glock only issue. Walther has had similar issues with the P-99, and there are others.

    I bought the first Glock 22 that showed up in my town in July, 1990, and actually, the G-22 beat the 4006 to market. Glock was very quick to go into production once the cat was out of the bag. They took their 9mm barrel and bored it to .40. To ensure it would feed reliably, they opened up the chambermouth to the point that caseheads are not adequately supported. Particularly over the feedramp, the 6 O' Clock position.

    I find more Glock cases with bulged caseheads than those I find without. But, it is safe to say that I was never so enamored with the Glock I couldn't find another pistol in .40 to shoot my handloads in. The rectangular striker signature makes it easy to identify Glock brass, but I examine any case I pick up for case head bulges. They go into the recycle bin as well.;)
     
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