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.40 S&w

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by italian biker, Feb 2, 2008.

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  1. italian biker

    italian biker Member

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    Hey all, I started reloading my 40's today, and it seems that there will be very little space between the back of the bullet and the powder. What do you think is the minimum space to have so there won't be a pressure increase? BTW, if it matters, I'm using Hogdon Universal(clays), 6 grains of it, with a 155 grain copper plated bullet, seated to match the size gauged by use of the caliper of a factory 165 fmj grain round
     
  2. Grandpa Shooter

    Grandpa Shooter Member

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    As long as you are below the max load and it is not a compressed powder situation, you should be good to go. 40 is one of the snappier calibers due to the case being so short.
     
  3. ammopoor

    ammopoor Member

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    I agree with grandpa shooter I load my 40 loads the same as I do my 45. Im using berrys 155 FN at 5.4 W231 with no problems and recoil very similar to over the counter plinking ammo.
     
  4. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    That's a good thing. You would have to be compressing the powder a fair ways, say anywhere from 1/8 inch to 3/16 inch depending on which powder, (does it pack easily or is it allready real dense - 700X vs AA #5), before you run into problems.
     
  5. FieroCDSP

    FieroCDSP Member

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    There are a few loads in 40cal that are listed as compressed. a 135gr jacketed on 10.5 grains 800X comes to mind. Stick to the recipe and you should be okay.
     
  6. italian biker

    italian biker Member

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    It wasn't a real tight pack of powder. And the bullet wouldn't compress it to 1/8th. It looked like the bullet would be just at the powder when seated at proper depth. This is my first time reloading rounds in 7 or so years, and first time with the 40. I did 357 in the past, and don't remember how high the powder piled up in the shell. Never had a problem with any of the 357's when they were shot off.
     
  7. FieroCDSP

    FieroCDSP Member

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    You should be fine with that load. THe Lee load data lists the max as a compressed charge, so what you have is expected. The listing I have in there is for an XTP, which usuallt lists a hot loading for proper expansion. Generally you want to reduce the charge a touch more with plated bullets if using jacketed data. I usually do a 5% reduction off a listed starting load, which probably ends up being a 12-13% reduction off a max load.
     
  8. stubbicatt

    stubbicatt Member

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    For all around good blasting ammo you could try 180 grain plated bullets and 4.5 or so grains of Titegroup. Works very well for me and is an economical load.

    You can also substitute a cast bullet it you want.

    Have fun with your new ammo!
     
  9. Shoney

    Shoney Member

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    italian biker:
    It's probably time for you to get a good caliper to measure your COL's by the recipe. 165 gr jacketed bullets are seated at a shorter COL than 165 gr and 155 gr lead or copper plated bullets. So your use of the 165 gr Jacketed COL for the 155 gr plated will give you a reduced powder space as compared to what it should have been; but your reduction is not a dangerous level as you are not near max.

    Also remember that heavier bullets (which are longer than the lighter bullets)use less powder than the lighter bullet; and plated bullets "generally" are to be shot with lighter charges than jacketed bullets of the same weight.

    Sometimes the listed COL will not functin in individual weapons and must be adjusted a hair longer or shorter in order to feed and extract properly. Loads and COL are not written in stone, and are only guidelines. Varying slightly from them should be done with careful thought.
     
  10. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    I like the 180 at casual velocities myself. I'm not a Titegroup fan though and use other powders.
     
  11. italian biker

    italian biker Member

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    Thanks all, Shoney,
    I made a dead dummy round while adjusting the bullet seating die setting, using the caliper to match a 165 gr factory fmj. Then checked size every 20 or so rounds.
    I'm not competition shooting, so I don't need to play with the load at all. Merely practice rounds. The 155's were the lowest priced .40's they had in stock the day I was at Cabelas.
     
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