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40 smith and wesson

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by jd70, Mar 4, 2008.

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  1. jd70

    jd70 Member

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    I have a few questions about loading the 40 smith. What exactly do they mean when they say " the case head must be supported." It's usually mentioned with glocks. Does this mean that it can only be reloaded a few times or that blown cases are common? And is it only a glock problem? If so what pistols don't have this problem?
     
  2. FieroCDSP

    FieroCDSP Member

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    If you look closely at the typical Glock 40's brass, you'll see a bulge, like it's pregnant. This is the place where the feed ramp leads into the chamber. The cartridge settles into the chamber properly, but that part of the case above the ramp is not supported, and when the brass stretches, it leaves a bulge.
    The severety of the bulge is dependant upon the pressure the case has placed on it and the thickness and overall quality fo the brass. Some brass is less elastic than others due to it's metallugy.

    Now, as to loading.... I have personally loaded brass that was fired in a glock and had a barely noticible bulge. I would never load a casing that had a bulge as bad as some picts that can be found on the net. If starting out with the 40, it's best to scrap all Glock 40 brass for safety. Glock brass can be ID'd by the rectangular impression around the firing pin strike on the primer.

    Now, some after-market Glock barrels are more, or fully supported. THe best way to check a Glock barrel is to remove the barrel from the gun and drop a round into the chamber on it. If you can see more than a millimeter of the case wall where the feed-ramp meets the chamber, it's not fully supported.
     
  3. FieroCDSP

    FieroCDSP Member

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    The Smith M&P is fully supported (I bought mine for that reason) and most of the other 40's out there. THe Glock reliability comes from the relatively shallow angle created by the intruding feed-ramp. Pick up some snap-caps and test a few barrels in the store with them (remember to strip the gun first). Explain to the sales-person what you're looking for, and I'm sure any competent one can help you find a good selection of full-support guns.
     
  4. dakotasin

    dakotasin Member

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    if you take the barrel out of your gun, and drop a case into it, then look at the 6 o'clock position (usually) many times you will see some of the case. note you don't see this at the other positions. if the case head were 'fully supported' you would not see any of the case in any of the positions. this is pretty common in autoloaders due to the feed ramp.

    this is a very debateable point. my thinking is 'not really'.

    most definitely not - and again, 'problem' is debateable. my sig, m&p, and xd exhibit some case. some of them show less than others (m&p), but they all show it.

    don't know.
     
  5. DWARREN123

    DWARREN123 Member

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    I reload for my GLOCK's and use the brass from them. Just like any other reloading check all brass, a little bulge will not hurt and do not go to max with reloads unless you have a lot of experience with the caliber.
     
  6. Crazy4nitro

    Crazy4nitro Member

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    BarrelChambers.jpg

    The Barrel on the left is a Factory Glock Barrel. The Barrel on the right is a Lone Wolf Barrel. I colored the Cases red with a sharpie to make the case easier to see.
    I reload FMJ for my Stock barrel. I bought the Lone Wolf Barrel to shoot Lead or whatever I wish. I dont make Nuclear Loads with my stock barrel because as you can see the amt. of unsupported case exposed. Thus the source of the Infamous "Glock Bulge". I have re-used the same cases from my stock barrel several times with no issues as my Lee Dies resize the entire length. No worries for me as I shoot reduced loads 90% of the time.

    I hope this Helps.

    'Nitro
     
  7. jd70

    jd70 Member

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    Thanks!!! This is exactly what I wanted to know.
     
  8. Shoney

    Shoney Member

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    First. My 40's have supported barrels.

    Early on in the history of the 40, most of the "once fired" brass that was sold was Glocked, simply because there were a lot of Glocks sold to law enforcement, and they supplied the market with brass.

    At first, I was leary of reloading them, but did so with medium target loads. Subsequently, I have loaded many of these Glocked brass more than 20 times with no problems.

    And to address the other Glock Urban Myth, I carefully shoot lots of lead in polygonal barrels. Go to Glock Talk and search for info.
    www.glocktalk.com/
     
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