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.44 magnum dies which ones?

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by p5200, Apr 4, 2019.

  1. p5200

    p5200 Member

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    I have a Forster Coax press and need a set of dies for it for .44 magnum for my Ruger Super Redhawk any advice on which brands work well would be appreciated! :)
     
  2. troy fairweather

    troy fairweather Member

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    my rcbs carbide have served me well, but the lee will work just as good.
     
  3. jak67429

    jak67429 Member

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    pretty much any carbide dies should work just fine for your single stage press. You could use non carbide dies but would need to lube the cases before sizing.
     
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  4. p5200

    p5200 Member

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    Do the rcbs dies have a factory crimp die with them? Thanks! :)
     
  5. drband

    drband Member

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    My Lee carbide die set came with a FCD. I’ve been totally satisfied with them.
     
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  6. troy fairweather

    troy fairweather Member

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    you can roll crimp with the seating die, just get any taper crimp thats cheapest.
     
  7. crestoncowboy

    crestoncowboy Member

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    I have a lee set and an RCBS set. Both are fine.

    If loading lighter loads I seat and crimp in one station with the rcbs normally. Every seating die I've seen has built in crimping. Some calibers it's better to seat in one step and crimp in another to keep from buckling brass. Loading for a heavy redhawk a decent crimp will work but for a lightweight like a 329pd, or a heavier recoiling gun with heavier bullets you may have to exaggerate your crimp to stop bullets from working out under recoil. Limp wristing will make that worse too.
     
  8. dgod
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    dgod Contributing Member

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    IF, you can find the 4 die RCBS Set, it works great. I have had great luck with it.

    Good Luck
    dg
     
  9. Arkansas Paul

    Arkansas Paul Member

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    I bought the Hornady Custom dies and do not like them.
    I would go with Lee if I had it to do again. As it is, I may buy the Lee dies anyway.
     
  10. edwardware

    edwardware Member

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    If you have to ask: Lee.
    » or RCBS (esp. from FleaBay) because I'm not sure the Lee rings will play with the Coax. I think you need Forester-style rings.

    Once you're shooting MOA on silhouettes, you can think about a Redding set
     
  11. ColtPythonElite

    ColtPythonElite Member

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    I use Lee for my .44. No complaints
     
  12. hdbiker

    hdbiker Member

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    My .44 dies are RCBS carbide. But now I wish I had bought the Lee carbide set with factory crimp die . hdbiker
     
  13. FROGO207

    FROGO207 Member

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    I have two sets of Lee carbide dies and have had good luck with them for many years. I always buy duplicates of dies (or at least seaters) so I can leave them set up for different bullets.

    I have the FCD but have not used it yet as my ammo works well as is.
     
  14. GBExpat

    GBExpat Member

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    For .44spc/mag I use a Lee die set (carbide) along with an RCBS seater die (w/changeable plugs).
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2019
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  15. mdi

    mdi Member

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    I have a Co-Ax and use dies from RCBS, Pacific, Redding, and Lee. I have changed most lock rings over to Forster/Sinclair rings mainly because they are thicker than others and fit the slot better. I have a few dies I still use with the stock rings, one set is Lee. I removed the O-ring and drilled and tapped the ring for an 8-32 setscrew (nylon tipped) and it works well. I just use the die for bullet seating where strength is not an issue and I don't get excess variation.

    I believe any modern manufactured die set will produce good ammo if the user does his part and the differences are mostly personal preference of finish and looks. (Redding dies are purty!). One die I do not recommend is the Lee FCD for handgun cartridges. The die is a post crimping sizing die and often does more harm than good. I highly suggest a new reloader learn how to adjust their dies, use a specific crimp (roll for revolvers, taper for semi-auto) and if there are any chambering problems, find out why and fix it, don't just cover it up... (My opinion from 35+ years of revolver reloading and 25+ years of semi auto reloading and experimenting with a Lee FCD)
     
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  16. Livin_Cincy

    Livin_Cincy Member

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    You will never wear out a set of carbide dies so they are all equal.

    If you plan to shoot Lead, Hard Cast or Powder Coated bullets then a Lyman M-Die for flaring is nice. Or the Redding or RCBS versions are very nice. Or you can buy a Lee Universal and buy the diameter you wish from NOE. Bullet size coordinating with cylinder throats is important and the Lyman M die design reduce the possibility of swaging down your bullet with the case.

    A Factory Crimp Die is useful in Auto Pistols and for FMJ & Plated bullets. With a lead or powder coated bullet you typically want larger bullets. This is where the debate about a Lee FCD sizing your bullet to SAAMI spec and not the diameter you want comes up. Lee notes that their FCD is a Taper Crimp Die in 44 magnum:
    "The Lee Taper Crimp Die is hardened steel designed to overcome crimp problems caused by poor die design. These dies offer little or no advantage when used with 1986 or newer Lee Dies as the crimp angle is already a modified taper crimp. Jacketed bullets must have a crimp groove." https://leeprecision.com/reloading-dies/hand-gun-dies/taper-crimp-die/

    I picked up a set of Lyman 38/357 dies because on eBay it was a few dollars more than an M-Die alone. They come with seating stems to match several bullet profiles which is nice. I shoot flat nose Lead & Powder Coated SWC & WC typically so this was very nice. I still use my Lee Dies to size & deprime and then use the LEE seating die to roll crimp into the bullet's crimp groove. I do not use the FCD as they chamber fine into my cylinders. So I am using half Lyman and half Lee dies.
     
  17. Toprudder

    Toprudder Member

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    IMHO, get the Lee 3 die set (minus the FCD) and then buy their collet crimp die.

    The normal FCD will try to resize bullets that are .430 or larger when you crimp, due to the carbide resizing ring. The collet crimp die does not have the carbide ring, and will apply a crimp that is more uniform and does not depend on trim lengths to be the same.
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2019
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  18. 375supermag

    375supermag Member

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    Hi...
    I use RCBS carbide dies and have never had any problems with them.
    After many thousands of rounds reloaded, I believe they will last through the balance of my life and probably my son's as well.
    I always purchase a separate seating die for each bullet style that I shoot in a given caliber. I adjust it to the desired setting and set the locking ring. I don't like to constantly fiddle with setting seating depth and crimp, so I make the investment in additional seating dies to avoid that task. Over the course of years and thousands of rounds, the additional cost is negligible.
     
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  19. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    Can't go wrong with RCBS, but they all generally work.
     
  20. JimKirk

    JimKirk Member

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    I have two sets of RCBS carbide and one set of Lyman ..... .44 Mag dies....

    But I use several other brands of dies in my CoAx ....
     
  21. Reloadron
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    Reloadron Contributing Member

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    Look at what each set includes by part number. I use a Lee #90512 set which while a 3 die set includes a powder through die I really have no use for. I also have a RCBS #18612 3 die set which I like because it affords a nice roll crimp and includes a few bullet seating stems for RN and FP bullets. Anyway, just make sure you know what is in the box before buying the box. :)

    Ron
     
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  22. MikeInOr

    MikeInOr Member

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    I recently picked up a set of RCBS dies off of ebay for about half the going price... new old stock with the slightest bit of surface oxidation which cleaned right up. I went with the Lee collet crimp die which I think I also found a sale on. The RCBS and Lee make for a very nice setup in my Dillon 650. The thing I like about RCBS dies is that I can buy the depriming pins locally and don't have to wait for a package in the mail after I bend my last depriming pin.
     
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  23. Toprudder

    Toprudder Member

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    The powder-thru die also expands and flares. Are you saying you don't do that step?
     
  24. drband

    drband Member

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    I think that Lee's website is a bit confusing... Here's their description for a .44special/magnum/Russian Factory Crimp Die:
    Lee 44 Special, 44 Magnum and 44 Russian Carbide Factory Crimp Die sizes the cartridge while being crimped so every round will positively chamber freely with factory like dependability. This die applies a roll crimp. The adjusting screw quickly and easily sets the desired amount of crimp. Trim Length is not critical so this extra operation takes less time than it would if cases were trimmed and chamfered. A firm crimp is essential for dependable and accurate ammunition, as it eliminates the problems of poor ignition of slow burning magnum powders.

    In my limited experience, the Lee FCD in my 4-die set does indeed apply a roll crimp, and the more crimp (within reason) you use, the more that crimp is turned into the groove while leaving the rest of the bullet unmodified.

    I believe Lee's auto pistol FCDs use a taper crimp, and their rimmed cartridge (revolver) FCDs us a roll crimp.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2019
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  25. Jack B.

    Jack B. Member

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    When I buy pistol caliber dies for a single stage press I try to buy two sets. A new sent and shop for a used set. The new set I use for resizing, flaring and bullet seating. I use the bullet seating and crimping die out of the used set to crimp in a separate stage. I've always have crimped in a separate step. Have never liked crimping when seating a bullet.
     
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