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.45 vs .40 vs .357Sig recoil control question

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by Redcoat3340, Mar 1, 2018.

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  1. Redcoat3340

    Redcoat3340 Member

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    I have a bunch of 9s & .38 specials. Pretty good bunch (Smiths, BHPs, Sigs, Walthers) all in both metal and plastic.

    I gave my boys my .45s years ago and focused on 9 and 38.

    I want one gun in a bigger caliber.

    My immediate thought was to go back to .45, and I'm considering a Smith 4506 or similar S&W; Beretta PX4 or Sig 220 (I'm not interested in a 1911....have one in 9 and that's enough)

    I had kinda ruled out .40 as I've read its recoil was quite snappy while the .45 in a heavy metal gun was more of a push. I know zip about .357 Sig.

    Then I was doing a little reading about the S&W 4006 and that its a heavy stainless gun and something of a recoil tamer, especially compared to lighter, plastic 40s.

    So I'm wondering if I can get some real life commentary on recoil of the three calibers. (I know I can just suck it up, practice a lot and get used to it, etc....but I'm of an age now where I don't need or want to do that. I just want to have some fun with bigger bullets.)
     
  2. GRIZ22

    GRIZ22 Member

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    I never cared for the 40. While the recoil on a 45 seems more like a push. To me the 40 and the 357 SIG is more like a slap.

    My favorite 45 load pushes a 200 gr bullet at about 1000 fps (well within std pressures) . About the same as a 40. Anything I would care to do with a 357 SIG I can do just as well and with heavier bullets with a 357 magnum.

    One of the reasons 40 and 357 SIG give sharper recoil is just about all of them are built on 9mm franes.

    JMO
     
  3. Fine Figure of a Man

    Fine Figure of a Man Member

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    The 40 is no different than any other round, it's recoil depends on bullet weight and velocity and on the gun. In a full size steel gun it's going to be pretty mild. In 357 Sig muzzle blast significant, the recoil is a little more than hot 9mm rounds.
     
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  4. FIVETWOSEVEN

    FIVETWOSEVEN Member

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    My experience is that .45 has more flip but about the same kick as 9mm and .357 has slightly more recoil than standard 9mm. .40 becomes too much when I shoot it for a few thousand rounds. This comparison of mine is from shooting all calibers through the Sig P320.
     
  5. M1key

    M1key Member

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    The Glock 21s are accurate and softer shooter than any 1911 I have owned (past tense).

    I'm also saving a few nines for old(er) age.

    Oh, did I mention Glock?

    M
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2018
  6. Garandimal

    Garandimal Member

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    400 subsonic lb-ft, is 400 subsonic lb-ft.

    My compact .45 ACP/230 gr. GLOCK G36 shoots like my compact .40/180 gr. GLOCK G23.

    That said, the SIG 220 would be hard to beat.

    Especially in SAO.




    GR
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2018
  7. cfullgraf

    cfullgraf Member

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    I know the OP is not interested in a 1911 but the 1911 really tames the recoil of 40 S&W and 357 Sig. I have a 1911 chambered in each of these cartridges plus a few other cartridges.
     
  8. gerrym526

    gerrym526 Member

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    Perceived recoil is a combination of a number of variables-
    1) Gun frame weight
    2) Frame size
    3) Frame material
    4) Size of round, and type (training round vs. self-defense round-in any caliber)
    5) Your shooting experience
    6) Grip, stance, and presentation

    Asking lots of people a question about how a round or gun recoils won't get you the answer you need. The most practical approach is to go to your local gun shop and rent guns you think you might be interested in, and try the different rounds you mention (40, 45acp, 357sig), and see how they feel in your hand. You will find each gun unique-sometimes a small gun has very little recoil while a larger one "snaps" in your hand, more often the opposite is true. You weren't specific about why recoil might be an issue for you. Is it older weaker (or arthritic) hands? Will you be shooting lots of target rounds though it and don't want your hand to ache after a trip to the range? Will it be a carry gun that you need to practice with before concealing, and so want something that won't punish your hand during training sessions?

    Again I'd emphasize a "rent and try before you buy" approach. Ammo through rental guns (no matter how many you try) is still cheaper than buying a gun based on someone else's opinion about its recoil.
    Only your hand and arms know the answer to this question by shooting the gun yourself.
    This approach has always worked for me. I shoot 38, 357 mag, 45acp, and 9mm in both large frame and small concealed guns, and shoot enough rounds in practice that recoil becomes a non-issue. You may find the same, once you find a gun you like the recoil management with.
    Hope this helps.
    Gerry
     
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  9. Redcoat3340

    Redcoat3340 Member

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    A bunch of good advice here. Many thanks.

    I'm afraid a bout of the Signess took me down before I could get to my range (they are closed this week for annual dig-out-the-lead-from-the-backstop), so I'm getting the P220. But it comes with a .22 conversion slide and mags....so if my hand gets weary I'll shoot little bullets.
     
  10. Tallball

    Tallball Member

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    In big steel pistols neither 40 nor 45acp is bad at all for me. The 45acp is NBD at all, and the 40 is only mildly snappy. The key is a pistol as big and heavy as you can comfortably hold.

    If you want a mild handgun with a big hole in the end, 44 special in a nice big revolver is my personal fav. :)
     
  11. Riomouse911

    Riomouse911 Member

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    Gerrym526 put it best.

    Guns and caliber opinions are an awful lot like pick up truck opinions... unless someone has a real lemon they will shade their bias and opinion towards the guns they own just like they do for the trucks they own. No one wants to be told they made a poor choice in a truck, especially when you still owe 23 more payments on it. Same goes for a gun or a caliber...

    "Ttry before you buy" would save a lot of people buyers remorse after their first trip to the range with a new gun they bought on the advice of others.

    Good luck on your quest!
     
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  12. harrygunner

    harrygunner Member

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    Those three calibers has one thing in common. A healthy person can choose to focus on grip, sight picture, trigger control and other fundamentals while moving recoil out of the list of concerns.

    For service-type rounds, one can even get to the point where they don't notice recoil.
     
  13. Zerodefect

    Zerodefect Member

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    "This sword is too heavy."
    "Grow Stronger!"

    Is this a Glock 41 thread yet?
     
  14. Delford

    Delford Member

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    I like my Silverado but it's big. I can't buy a Colorado because the seats don't adjust and the Silverado with a 5.3 (327) gets about the same mileage as the V6. When the Ranger comes back I'll be looking at it because the Chevy will be paid off and while it was the best option at the time, it won't be if the Ranger seat adjusts.

    I was trying out 9mm single stacks for CC and saved $370 by not buying a PPS. I spent $125 at two ranges trying them out so net result was a savings. I found I shoot the Ruger LC9s best. "Try before you buy" saved me from buying a gun I wouldn't have liked. None of them outshot my PM45 so I'm staying with it. I really do like the CZ 75D PCR 9mm though.
     
  15. Tallball

    Tallball Member

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    I'm still driving my 1970 model F100. Maybe after I wear it out I will try a Chevy. I'm not holding my breath. It doesn't seem to be wearing out.
     
  16. Riomouse911

    Riomouse911 Member

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    When we were told twins were in our future I had to sell my 1999 7.3 F250 because the car seats wouldn't fit in the xtra cab...had to buy a 6.0 F250 crew cab in 2007 to fit the brood.... or I would still be driving the 7.3.

    I'm not a Ford lover per se, I got a smoking deal on the crew cab and couldn't say no. I love the look, hate the motor! I love the chevy turning radius and ride, not a fan of the low front approach angle and do not like the squared off wheel wells... I also love the Dodge look and Cummins motor, not a fan of the interior or seats.

    As with guns: always try before you buy! :thumbup:
     
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