6°f "real feel" -8° due to wind chill. Lets see if I can last 5 hours.

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by daniel craig, Jan 15, 2022.

  1. HowieG

    HowieG Member

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    I was part of a reliability and maintainability testing team on the very first production UH60A helicopters in 79-80. We did stuff real life in Delta Junction, Alaska and Yuma Proving Grounds.
     
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  2. HowieG

    HowieG Member

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    For bodies, I would prefer to just make dinner reservations.
     
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  3. Rubone

    Rubone Member

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    You missed the reason for Howie G's comment...
     
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  4. dannyd

    dannyd Member

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    Followed right behind you 80 to 82 for the Navy. We did real life too took her out in the Atlantic in Sea State 8 from Coast of Florida to the Arctic Ocean. The lab was more fun :)
     
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  5. HowieG

    HowieG Member

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    You are a better man than me, Gunga Din. I want nothing to do with sea state 8. As it was, we had nothing but trouble with those first Hawks. Not the most reliable things that ever flew.
     
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  6. Shanghai McCoy

    Shanghai McCoy Member

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    A helicopter is just an optical illusion with sound effects... ;)
     
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  7. dannyd

    dannyd Member

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    I was on Seahawks from March 1980 to August 1995; it truly was the worst piece of equipment I ever worked on.
     
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  8. HowieG

    HowieG Member

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    Well, I am glad to know there is come consistency between services.
     
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  9. HowieG

    HowieG Member

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    I worked on them and flew in them for about 30 years. Those illusions tried to kill me more than once.
     
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  10. wombat13

    wombat13 Member

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    My grandfather fought in the Bulge and Hurtgen Forest. He told my father that during the battle of HF he and other GIs had to lay in the snow for days. Anyone who even raised his head was likely to be shot. I sometimes think about trying to get a sense of the excruciating cold they must have felt. For many years I've thought about researching the clothing US GIs wore in the European theater during the winter and then trying to source similar for myself. Then go out and hunt for a day in those clothes in December with my Garand. I won't have the same terrifying motivation to endure the cold, but I'd just like to know a little bit of what it was like for him.
     
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  11. HowieG

    HowieG Member

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    You don't have to grab WW2 gear, although replica stuff is there for enactors. We continued to use the same basic stuff right down to the boots right up to 1980 or so. The boots were especially a problem in the cold and wet of Germany. That really sucked for me. Cold wet boots make you miserable and they don't dry out very fast at all. I was wearing Corcoran Jump Boots in 1975 that were the same as WW2 except mine were black.
     
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  12. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Member

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    My father was in the same battles as armored infantry with the 3rd Armored Div.

    He didn't talk much about the war, but he said more than once the most important thing was a pair of dry socks. He wound up in the hospital with trench foot. That winter in Germany was record cold.
     
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  13. wombat13

    wombat13 Member

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    I can only imagine. I always wear waterproof boots and usually Lacrosse 800 gram thinsulate rubber boots. And my toes still get cold if I sit in the stand for hours.
     
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  14. wombat13

    wombat13 Member

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    Grandfather was in the 4th Divison
     
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  15. HowieG

    HowieG Member

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    Well, I live in the desert, so not a whole lot of chance to get my feet wet anymore, but if I do end up in snow in the mountains, I have Pac boots just sitting in the closet. Normally I wear my 5.11 desert boots.
     
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  16. Random 8

    Random 8 Member

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    That sounds like a fairly typical cold snap for mid-November in Northern MN. We usually get one like that, sometimes worse, during firearms season. I've had a couple mornings over the years when the mercury read 15-20 below and just chucked some wood in the stove and crawled back under the covers.

    Deer have a lot in common with us. We're both warm blooded mammals, driven by the same primal urges. Ever notice how by mid-winter, a cold snap that would be teeth chattering in November ain't so bad now? Deer are the same.

    The first bitter cold of the season, say single digits or colder in my part of the world will lock them down. They're still fat and happy from the summer greenery and fall mast, and other than the rut, have little inclination to wander about. They'll flop down in tight cover under a balsam, white pine or cedar, and be content to browse a 50 yard radius. Even the local corn field won't tempt them much unless snow is coming, that seems to trip a different primal urge and get them feeding. By muzzleloader season in late November, that same single digit cold snap won't phase them much. They'll be much more food oriented, and happy to come out in the late afternoon before the mercury drops. Even towards the end of the first cold snap, they will show signs of acclimating and become more active in the cold. By mid-winter, zero is happy weather. It takes -20 to lock them down in January here. After prolonged cold, they will become very food oriented and most active at the warmest feeling (not necessarily warmest mercury) locations and parts of the day, favoring sheltered and sunny areas with food resources. The higher calorie food, the better.
     
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  17. caribou

    caribou Member

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    The night before last was -47f in our little village in the Arctic, today a spankin' 7 above.

    Stalk and spot a bit and keep moving, even slowly.... thats the best option.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2022
  18. Patocazador

    Patocazador member

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    It has never been as low as +7 degrees where I live. You and Agnes should consider retiring in Florida. No caribou but a few deer and bears plus a mess of hogs.
     
  19. 9x56MS

    9x56MS Member

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    That comment brought back memories. When I was a kid my brothers and I got with the neighbor kids on full moon winter nights to go sled riding down the hills around home. After we would often climb on top of the chicken coop and brake out the telescope to star gaze or sometimes catch a meteor shower. Great times. Many a time we would have to bail off the sled so as not to hit deer. Several of our paths were old logging roads through the woods. Thanks for bringing back those memories.
     
  20. HowieG

    HowieG Member

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    Well here is a picture I took off the top of the chicken coop, lol. This is Tranquility Base, where Apollo Eleven landed in 1969.
    Moon_203546_091718_g5_ap18 Tranquility Base.jpg
     
  21. Rockrivr1

    Rockrivr1 Member

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    Not hunting, but went skiing in the White Mountains of NH last week. Thursday it was -2 degrees in the morning with wind chills in the -30s. It was brisk!
     
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  22. HowieG

    HowieG Member

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    I picked up some frost bite on one cheek once upon a time skiing in the wind when I was young. I am sure I thought I was having fun.
     
  23. 9x56MS

    9x56MS Member

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    That was about the era we were sledding late 60’s early70’ back before plastic sleds when you could actually steer them.
     
  24. HowieG

    HowieG Member

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    I figured.
     
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  25. 9x56MS

    9x56MS Member

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    Got frostbite on my toes during NATO winter maneuvers. Coldest snowiest winter in Germany since 1944. Frostbite is no joke have a helluva time trying to keep my feet warm on deer stand. The Muck arctic sport boots are the first civilian boots to do it. I can bet there are many veterans on here that can guess the only other boots to work.
     
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