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6.5 Jap

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by MilAvSoc, Jan 13, 2009.

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  1. MilAvSoc

    MilAvSoc Member

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    Does anyone know anything about this gun? This is a type 38, with the chrysanthemum intact. I have looked up the markings on this gun and learned quite a bit, but that tells me only that it was captured in the field. The sad part is that some goofus butchered the stock. Attempted to sporterize it.
    Anyone having more knowelege of this gun PLEASE email me at mas570@yahoo.com
     
  2. logjam

    logjam Member

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    Your Arisaka 99 is a 7.7 Jap. Not 6.5 Jap. That round fits the Model 38 Arisaka, which is a different rifle.

    If you have a Model 38 it may have been reworked to .257 Roberts which was a very popular re-chambering right after WWII, when zillions of these Model 38s and 99s were brought home.

    Those re-chamberings to .257 Roberts are, or can be dangerous and I've read where they should not be fired.

    Norma used to load both the 7.7 and 6.5 Jap rounds, which are both good rounds. I don't know if they do so today, but you can still buy components and dies to reload for them. The 7.7 uses a .311 bullet usually, but I've seen folks load .308s in there. Cartridges of the World would be a good source for loads and bullets.

    The stocks on both the Model 99 and Model 38 Jap rifles were just terrible. They were birch and made of two pieces that ran the length of the stock and glued together in the butt stock. Many that you find today are split along the joint between the two pieces.

    For many years people who fabricated replacement stocks for military rifles made stocks for these Arisakas. They made good shooters.

    Your 99 should have a wire "prop" that fits into those little holes on the forearm band. It should also have a sliding bolt cover. Both of these items were usually removed.

    The rear sight should have "wings" that swivel down the sides of the sight. These were used for leading aircraft. Often times these were removed by the soldiers too.

    The big knutled knob you see at the base of the bolt is the safety. You push on it with the palm of your hand and roll that to one side. It works very well. The safety is absolutely silent.

    Concerning the shootability of the guns. When tested at the end of WWII they blew up last, so a good one, in original caliber should be strong. However a bunch of later produced models can be unsafe. You can tell these by the rough bolt handles and the very simple peep sight that's just in front of the bolt. These guns are interesting as collectors, but don't shoot one. I'd check with someone who knows these rifles before I shot it.

    I own and shoot both guns. While a bit short in the stock....Many of those Japanese soldiers were little guys. The rifles shoot straight and the 6.5 shoots very flat. The 7.7 has numbers similar to an '06. It's a good shooter too.
     
  3. Animal Mother

    Animal Mother Member

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    I own a Type 38 with the original mum, it shoots a 6.5X50 mm round. Hornady makes ammo for it, but it is a bit on the expensive side, at about $22 per box of 20. Your rifle should be safe to shoot so long as it isn't one of the last ditch models. The rifles with the mum command a premium on the resale market, but the sporterized stock will hurt its value. You might luck out and find an unaltered stock on a parts gun that you could use to restore yours on the cheap but you'll have to do some real searching. It is a neat gun, and if you can find an original bayonet for it with the hooked crossguard, it will really set it apart from your other WWII rifles.

    Numrich ( www.gunpartscorp.com) has some parts for them last I checked. Also, check out www.surplusrifleforum.com as there are some guys on there with some real love and knowledge for these old warhorses.
     
  4. Hoppy590

    Hoppy590 Member

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    he clearly states it is a type 38 in his post.
     
  5. jonnyc

    jonnyc Member

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    Is there a pic here somewhere??? Sounds like someone saw some pics.
     
  6. lionking

    lionking Member

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    Regarding the mention of the stock can we confirm they were made in two pieces?,because I think maybe many that you see in glued together fashion were cut to fit in a bag for GI's to bring back home?
     
  7. rangerruck

    rangerruck Member

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    it has value if it is un altered, as good as 400 bucks really. I luuuuvvv this round, and wish someone made a new chambering for it. it is like the old Savage hi power, but with a bit more oomph becuase of the bigger bbl, though. There is very little to no milsurp floating around, so you almost have to get new made. Be prepared to spend 30 bucks a box, and if you get norma, it will be 40 or more. this is almost a must to handload.
     
  8. rangerruck

    rangerruck Member

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    after 1943, I think, that is when they started really throwing these together, and made 2 piece stocks, it was a long cut that went the length of the stock, down the middle, and not across the stock.
     
  9. WardenWolf

    WardenWolf member

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    Hornady makes both 6.5 and 7.7mm Jap. Cabela's stocks it.
     
  10. Animal Mother

    Animal Mother Member

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    AFAIK, the Japanese always made two piece stocks for their Type 38 and Type 99 rifles. I have never seen an original with a one piece stock.
     
  11. 351 WINCHESTER

    351 WINCHESTER Member

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    I know one thing for sure. These were some of the strongest bolt guns ever made. Too bad someone didn't think to ask the Japs how they made them so strong.
     
  12. Ian

    Ian Member

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    A duffel-cut stock would be chopped perpendicular to the barrel, usually underneath the band. The standard construction of Arisaka stocks uses one piece of wood for the main length of the stock, and a second for the toe, with the two dovetailed together in a joint parallel to the barrel. Take off the buttplate and you can probably see the dovetail.

    There are no last ditch Type 38s; all the late production rifles were 99s. A Type 38 is no more potentially unsafe than any other 60-year-old surplus rifle.

    MilAvSoc - What is the barrel length or overall length of your rifle? There were three different varieties of Type 38 with different lengths, and some are a good deal rarer than others. The original Type 38 was adopted in 1905 with a 31.25" barrel, and by the end of production in 1940, about 3 million were made. At some point during that production run, about 500,000 Type 38 Carbines (with 19" barrels) were made for cavalry and other specialized troops. Finally, between 1940 and 1945, an unknown number of long rifles were modified into Cavalry Carbines with 25" barrels. These are the rarest version of Type 38.

    Two elements that can help boost the value of a Type 38 are the presence of the original dust cover and cleaning rod, FWIW.
     
  13. logjam

    logjam Member

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    I have seen hundreds of the Arisaka rifles and all of them had the butt stock split down the middle lengthwise. All that I have seen have the joint at the same place on the stock.

    I understand that the GI's did cut some in half at the wrist to get them home, but I have only seen one or two.

    In the 60's and 70's the Jap rifles were considered as curios and were very cheap. I bought mine for $25. Bayonets were cheap too. About $1.50. Both of mine have the "mum" ground, which means they were carried back after the war was over. Battle field pickups have the "mum" intact.

    Generally I like the 38 better than the 99. It's heavier and has a longer barrel. Mine is absolutely mint and still has the tin bolt cover. It rattles. The breakdown carbines are very neat. I used to see them all of the time. Haven't seen one for years however.
     
  14. Ky Larry

    Ky Larry Member

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    IIRC, the 'mum is the mark of the Emperor. A Japanese soldier considered his rifle to be the personal property of the Emperor and was merely being loaned to him. That's one of the reasons they would die before surrendering.
     
  15. Slamfire

    Slamfire Member

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    The American Government ground the crests of Japanese rifles. Surprised the heck out of me, but one of our few remaining veterans came back with a duffle bag full of swords and rifles.

    His ship docked in San Diego. All departing GI's were required to open their duffle bags for inspection. He said there was a big pile of “bring back” Japanese hand grenades, mortar shells, mines :what: on one side. GI's who had Mum's on their Japanese rifles had to get in a line and have the Mum's ground off. And that is why the Mum's on his rifles were ground off.

    My Dad, he got rifles direct from a Depot in the middle of Tokyo bay. All the Mum's had been ground off before he arrived.
     
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