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8-Round Revolvers

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by ejnogarb, Mar 22, 2010.

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  1. ejnogarb

    ejnogarb Member

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    Any downsides to 8-round revolvers like a S&W 627? For example, is the cylinder weaker from holding 8 rounds? Hard to find holsters for it? General cost? Anything?
     
  2. Oro

    Oro Member

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    The N-frame smith was designed to hold six .44 caliber rounds. Without stretching the dimensions, it's easy to fit more, smaller rounds in there. Keep in mind metallurgical advances, which were dramatic between 1908/9 when that gun was introduced and the WWII era when the higher-pressure .357 was created. And they have been just as dramatic since then. Quite frankly, "This ain't your daddy's steel" anymore.

    The weak point on a six-shot N-frame's wall is not the spacing between cylinders. It's the cylinder locking notch cut to index the cylinder. If you examine "blown" S&Ws from overpressured rounds, the split is usually along this line - the outer wall area of the cylinder, right where the bolt notch cut is placed. By offsetting this in seven and eight shot guns, the weak point is actually removed. The minimum cylinder wall thickness point on a seven-shot 686, for example, is larger than it is on a six-shot. They all fit in the same leather as their conventional brethren.

    Full disclosure: I have not purchased or played with an eight-shot 627, but I would not at all fear it.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2010
  3. ijosef

    ijosef Member

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    I've been looking at a Taurus 608 for some time, even though they've jumped in price recently. They had a bunch at the last gun show I went to, but I'm not going to pay more for a used gun than one I could order brand new.

    The 608 has had reports of problems, but none regarding the integrity of the cylinder strength.
     
  4. Bill B.

    Bill B. Member

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    My S&W PC 627 is one of the finest revolvers I have ever shot. If it has a downside I haven't found it yet!
     
  5. 9mmepiphany

    9mmepiphany Moderator

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    the only downside i can think of is the lack of affordable 8-shot speedloaders
     
  6. Gunfighter123

    Gunfighter123 Member

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    Photo below is my S&W 627-4 in .38 Super --- it fits ALL the holsters my N frame 625 fits. Only downside is they cost more then 6 shot revolvers !!!

    [​IMG]


    Thats why I LOVE full moon clips !!! And I am sure you know that you can have almost any revolver cylinder cut to take "moonies" for around $100.

    EDIT --- I have pushed 130 gr. FMJs at over 1400 fps chronoed from this revolver and it showed no real high pressure signs such as flattened primes , hard/sticky ejection etc.
     
  7. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    In this environment of never ending litigation I'm sure no manufacturer would put out a product that was too weak, therefore being dangerous.

    I also agree the M627 is a great revolver made even better when it was made to hold 8 rounds of .357 Magnum goodness!
     
  8. Jenrick

    Jenrick Member

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    A buddy has a S&W 327. I'll be honest I've considered everything short of outright theft (and murder) to get it into my collection. 8 rounds of .357 mag with enough weight to make it feel like shooting .38 is unreal. .38+P rounds feel like wadcutter target loads, it's amazing.

    -Jenrick
     
  9. rogertc1

    rogertc1 member

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    What down side?

    [​IMG]
     
  10. FoMoGo

    FoMoGo Member

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  11. PT1911

    PT1911 Member

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    My Taurus 608 is the best shooting handgun I own... Very impressive!... and has not given me a single issue.
     
  12. SwampWolf

    SwampWolf Member

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    That and the fact that, due to the necessary close tolerances when comparing six-shot speedloaders with seven or eight ones, they aren't quite as "speedy" as their six round counterparts. Not as much "wiggle-room" when trying to get the nose of the bullets aligned with the cylinder chambers. Still, they're a whole lot faster than trying to fish out a fist full of cartridges from your pocket and trying to insert them one by one into the cylinder.
    Plus the fact that the need for a speed reload should be less important when you have two more rounds on board from the get-go.
     
  13. jad0110

    jad0110 Member

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    For me, another downside to the 8 shot 627s is that most will have the lock. No, I'm not bashing anyone who buys lock equipped S&Ws. I own a couple myself. But I've made a personal choice to not purchase any more, for the time being anyway.

    The other drawback is that I prefer blued carbon steel to stainless, and the Model 27 was never made in an 8 shot version that I'm aware of.
     
  14. FoMoGo

    FoMoGo Member

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    [​IMG]


    Jim
     
  15. jad0110

    jad0110 Member

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    I stand corrected. Very nice! :)
     
  16. DWFan

    DWFan Member

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    quote:
    "The weak point on a six-shot N-frame's wall is not the spacing between cylinders. It's the cylinder locking notch cut to index the cylinder. If you examine "blown" S&Ws from overpressured rounds, the split is usually along this line - the outer wall area of the cylinder, right where the bolt notch cut is placed. By offsetting this in seven and eight shot guns, the weak point is actually removed."

    The bolt notch on an eight round cylinder is in the same location relative to the chamber as a six-shot cylinder; ie. directly "above" it. Since the 8-shot N-frame S&W cylinder has the same distance from chamber to bolt cut as the six-shot N-frame cylinder, it is approx. the same strength in that area. The seven-shot cylinder, due to the odd number, places the bolt cut between the chambers. The best comparison is the Taurus M607 (seven-shot) vs. the M608 (eight shot) with Identical frames and identical cylinder dimensions.
     

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  17. Guy B. Meredith

    Guy B. Meredith Member

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    Hey, join ICORE and maybe you can score a really cheap PC627. I did--$20 worth of raffle tickets for a PC 627 V-comp. These revolvers are very popular with competition shooters.

    S&W supplies 4 to 5 of these each year for the International Revolver Championship in Morro Bay, CA; one drawing for new ICORE members, one for this and another for that. Just can't seem to find enough excuses to hand them out. :D
     
  18. TheShootist1894

    TheShootist1894 Member

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    Ill let you know what I think later today, I am leaving to go pick mine up :neener:
     
  19. shockwave

    shockwave Member

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    Thanks for posting that comment. I was wondering if it was just me or something with my HK speedloaders. I keep the 6-round and 7-round revolvers loaded with 2 speedloaders each and practice speed-reloading from time to time to keep my skills up. I've noticed the same thing - it's harder with the 7s, whereas the 6s seem to just fly right in.
     
  20. Guy B. Meredith

    Guy B. Meredith Member

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    HKs? Threw them out 8 years ago--never worked correctly; rounds hung up. Moonclips for the most part on 6, 7 and 8. Safariland where I have to on the 6.
     
  21. Stainz

    Stainz Member

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    Power level won't be a problem here, not that I expect that anything .357M SAAMI spec'd would ever hurt a 627. I simply shoot my 627s for fun, using .357M's loaded mildly - glorified .38 Special +Ps at most.

    Below you'll see my ~'01 vintage 5" JM PC627 V-Comp and <2yr old 4" 627 Pro.

    [​IMG]

    The V-Comp is worth more used than another new 627 Pro would cost today. The Pro is a better deal - not as great a trigger - remedied with some work - but the spring loaded front sight makes quick and tool-less front sight changes. Lots of plusses for the 4"-er - it'll be here long after the 5"-er is gone.

    For speedloaders, I use the Ranch Products moonclips - 50/$50 or 100/$75 delivered in blue. Not as fast as the 6-slot .45 ACPs in a 625, but faster than the HKS #587 Speedloaders and a 686+.

    Stainz
     
  22. rmfnla

    rmfnla Member

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    Right. The locking bolt notch is only offset on cylinders with an odd number of chambers.
     
  23. 230therapy

    230therapy Member

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