9 year project finally complete!

Discussion in 'Blackpowder' started by Smokepole14, Jun 21, 2022.

  1. Smokepole14

    Smokepole14 Member

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    Way way back in Jan of 2013 I started a project to “antique” my pietta new model army. The blueing was staring to come off in places and especially around the backstrap. It really bothered me and I always wanted to go after the old brown finish look. So i thought what the heck I’m gonna go for it. So I soaked the gun in vinegar to remove the factory blue and get it in the white. Next thing I know it’s been 9 years and two houses moved. I was goin through one of my ammo lockers and I found the bottle of birchwood casey plum brown. I thought to myself it’s time to finish what I started. So my project today was to finish what I started. In the 9 years the remmy had a tiny amount of surface rust starting to form. It wasn’t very much it’s been kept in a controlled climate. So i buffed it down with scotchbright and acetone real good to remove any oils. Took a propane torch and heated it up pretty good and started to work the plum brown in. Few hours later I’ll say I’m pretty happy with it so far. The only thing i see I don’t like is the brass trigger guard is to shiny. I’m gonna have to find a way to age it a little. Lighting isn’t the best but I’ll get more pics when I get the brass dulled down a bit. Here’s a before and after pic.
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    33811D75-C091-498A-A7AB-3CB61201DB0D.jpeg
     
  2. dave951

    dave951 Member

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    Love the after.

    To age brass, fume in a container with white vinegar. First get a container with airtight lid big enough for your parts. Next put a jar lid with white vinegar in the bottom. Put your parts in. Seal and place in sunshine. Leave till you're satisfied.
     
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  3. Danaidh

    Danaidh Member

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    Black powder residue will give a great aged patina on the brass. Each time you clean your revolver after firing it, rub the dirty powder residue patch/cloth on the brass. Let it develop a patina and then wipe with oil to keep the aged brass looking nice.

    Try it. Good luck in your endeavor.
     
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  4. Malachi Leviticus Blue

    Malachi Leviticus Blue Member

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    another method preferred by some to age the brass is to use ammonia fumes.
     
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  5. woodnbow
    • Contributing Member

    woodnbow Contributing Member

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    I’ve always used ammonia. They work great and look just like aged brass.
     
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  6. Smokepole14

    Smokepole14 Member

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    Thanks for the brass aging tricks! I’ll give them a try
     
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  7. 44 Dave

    44 Dave Member

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    I just use them (real b.p.) and it isn't long before they have a patina.
     
  8. dirt-poor

    dirt-poor Member

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    It's looking good!
     
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  9. woodnbow
    • Contributing Member

    woodnbow Contributing Member

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    That is a nice job of it… no too much as I’ve seen elsewhere. I have long wondered why manufacturers of these replicas are so doggone stuck on the poly stock finishes and bright orange red dies! Even plainest walnut looks good with a couple coats of an oil type finish and then it wears in to fit the owners hand. Of course it’s easily scratched and dinged but then so are the owners and we’re better for the experience.

    I received a copy of Sharps rifle of Montana the other day. Most of them were stored in blankets laying atop other Sharps rifles. Many many rifles worth. Not a lot of special care seems to have been paid to them beyond cleaning and oiling and the most of them look amazing.
     
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  10. nra-life-member

    nra-life-member Member

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    Very nice. Looks great!
     
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  11. J-Bar

    J-Bar Member

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    Having done similar work on several revolvers, I can tell you that the project is never completed. You will keep playing with it. And that is what it should be: a source of pleasure for years to come. Good job so far! :thumbup:
     
  12. misskitty2

    misskitty2 Member

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    j bar is 100% right
     
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  13. ThomasT

    ThomasT Member

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    That looks good. It almost makes me want to do my Pietta 1851 .36 caliber gun. Almost. :D
     
  14. gtrgy888

    gtrgy888 Member

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    I know that feeling of a job put off and finally completed. I just recently reinstalled a replacement loading lever pin for the Uberti 1851 I had put off. I bought it awhile ago to replace the last one that jiggled loose then just used duct tape on each side to retain the pin that whole time. I finally got so sick of the tacky appearance, I used a hammer and plyers to peen out the edges slightly, so the pin could be driven through, but only with hammer pressure. Then I fiddled the pin into position, hammered it in, and it got stuck so tight I can hardly tell the pin is a separate piece from the lever now.
     
  15. woodnbow
    • Contributing Member

    woodnbow Contributing Member

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    I’ve been antiquing this one for sixty years. With a little luck I’ll antique it for another ten or twenty.


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