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92fs or SIG 226 can't run dry?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by aerostar, Apr 29, 2012.

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  1. aerostar

    aerostar Member

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    I am no handgun expert, but I think I know something about metal. I run into a guy in another forum claiming that all metal handgun, such as 92fs or sig 226, has to be re-lubes after two to three month time of none usage, when the last lube would evaporate, before the gun can reliably cycle again. I know a little bit gun oil always help, but all medal, especially steel on steel kind mating, running dry (but clean) is not a big deal. The guy even go so far to say he had cleaned a 92fs without oiling, the gun turns into bolt action, you have to manually pull the slide before you can shoot again.

    I don't have any all steel hand gun so I can't dismiss his claim by try it myself, but does this sounds like yahoo to you? :confused:
     
  2. Nushif

    Nushif Member

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    My Beretta runs dry quite well. As do all her clones or knockoffs. Beyond that,sadly I can give no data, as I may know \m/ METAL \m/ but not metal.
     
  3. mljdeckard

    mljdeckard Member

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    I was issued a really bad M-9 that needed to be pampered to keep running, but it was because it was terribly worn. I would never say that it is any more or less likely to malfunction from running dry than nay other gun.
     
  4. Manson

    Manson Member

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    You're both right. Any handgun with full metal rails mated to a metal (steel stainless, alloys etc.) should be well lubed to prevent galling and premature wear. My 1911, Sigs, etc. are cleaned and the rails re-greased after every use. My Glocks just get a drop of oil on the tabs.

    This is not to say that a well made won't run without lube. It can but it is not advisable. As to re-lubing I never do it. But my guns see a lot of use, cleaning and re-lubing.
     
  5. jfrey

    jfrey Member

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    I have a friend who shoots both Sigs and a 92fs. The 92 will run fairly dry but the Sigs want and need more lube to run correctly. Any two metal surfaces that run against each other will run better with some amount of lube, even Glocks. It's just basic physics.
     
  6. Rule3

    Rule3 Member

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    As to the OP original statement, it depends on the gun lube used. Just because the gun sits unused does not mean the lube has evaporated and is no longer there. The new synthetic gun lubes will last indefinitely. I clean and lube my guns and put them away, it may be months before a certain one is shot again, I do not re lube it.

    Go to the Sig web site and watch the really boring guy show how to lube a Sig:) The TW 25 is a a excellent lube.

    http://www.sigsauer.com/CustomerService/MaintenanceGuides.aspx

    The Beretta site shows the new NANO being torture testing with no lube.
    It is still a metal slide on metal rails.

    http://www.sigsauer.com/CustomerService/MaintenanceGuides.aspx
     
  7. JTQ

    JTQ Member

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    Of course the Beretta and the Sig have steel slide riding on aluminum frames. Lube helps.
     
  8. coalman

    coalman Member

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    The more metal/metal contact, the more oil/lube (wet or dry type). Nothing new there. Why skimp?
     
  9. Shipwreck

    Shipwreck Member

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    Beretta 92s do need more lube than a Glock. It is a gun that likes to be run wet.

    I use Breakfree CLP. I do reoil my non carry 92s that I keep loaded about every three weeks. On the one I carry daily, I re-oil the rails 1x a week.

    it takes me less than a minute to put more Breakfree CLP on a toothbrush and run it on the rails and the locking block.

    I like Breakfree because it is one lube that I can use indoors without it bothering my asthma/allergies. I can't stand the smell of Weaponshield. remOil gives me a headache and gets me dizzy if I use it inside.
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2012
  10. Gtimothy

    Gtimothy Member

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    I use "Action Lube Plus" on my Sig P229's slide and a "home brew" oil on the action parts. I've never has the grease evaporate and neither will a good gun oil. If you are using a "CLP" type lube, then yes you will probably have to re lube occasionally because it is such a light lubricant.
     
  11. aerostar

    aerostar Member

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    Guys, first thanks all for your input. I am more educated now.

    Before this thread turns into discuss of lube, let me emphasis that my question is not about whether or not we should or how to lube an all metal handgun. It is about if an all metal handgun is not lubed, will it cease to function reliably for a while? say, a self defense situation. For a holstered gun, gun oil does seem to slipping away and mess up the holster somehow.

    What I don't understand is what this guy claimed: A 92FS, when cleaned but not oiled, it turns to be a bolt action handgun. one shot, one hand assist for recycle. His point is that all metal handgun are not good for self defense because, with his assertion, you wouldn't sure if the gun has enough lube left, hence prone to jam. I think this is Bull.

    I am no 92FS fan, neither am I a Sig one. But beyond my understanding of metals, those firearms are decent firearms that made by reputable manufacturer and they are fielded with numerous soldiers around the world. Hearing what this guy said really challenges my intelligence.
     
  12. Manson

    Manson Member

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    I don't know what the situation is with this particular gun. When someone says a gun likes to run wet that means it is less likely to malfunction if properly lubricated. But not run at all? Not sure. But my guess is that there are other issues with the firearm that are made worse by the lack of lube.

    The statement that all metal weapons are not good for this reason is silly. No weapon will be as reliable as it is capable of being without proper maintenance.
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2012
  13. PO2Hammer

    PO2Hammer Member

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    I bought a used P226 and took it straight to the range and had feeding problems. The rails were bone dry. No problems with a little oil or light grease. Tried lithium grease form the hardware store (the thick stuff) and that caused trouble too.
    Switched to Enos' Slide Glide Lite and never had trouble again.
     
  14. balance 740

    balance 740 Member

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    I used to carry a Beretta 90-two. After hearing about how these pistols needed to be lubed to run good, I took all the lube off the pistol with a can of brake cleaner, and put 150 rounds of dirty and weak range ammo through the pistol to see if it would make a difference in reliability. It didn't, in mine at least.

    I just wanted to know if my Beretta would run reliably if for some reason the lube dried out in my carry pistol. I found out. I never carry more than one spare mag. I have never carried 150 rounds of ammo when carrying concealed.

    I think any pistol with long guide rails on the frame like a Sig 226 or a Beretta 92 will need more lube than a pistol with small tabs on the frame like a Glock. But I also believe the "they need to be lubed to run" can be a little exaggerated in some cases.
     
  15. Shipwreck

    Shipwreck Member

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    I have never tried tor un any of my nine 92s dry.

    However, I have seen lots of reports online of guys who had a 92 not work for them on a range trip. Come to find out - they put no oil on it.

    I would never try shooting a 92 without it being lubed.
     
  16. balance 740

    balance 740 Member

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    Why not?

    I wouldn't think any damage or noticeable wear could come from only 150 rounds. If any did, I personally wouldn't want to own a pistol that delicate.

    I'm not recommending that people do this, but there is only one way to find out if you really want to know. I did the same thing with a Beretta Cougar I used to carry when I heard the same thing about it's rotating barrel needing lube. It ran perfectly well as well.
     
  17. EddieNFL

    EddieNFL member

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    Couple of months ago a fellow was using a 92 in an IDPA match. He was having a malfunction every three or four rounds. He mentioned he had cleaned it the night before and couldn't remember applying lube. He went to the safe area, oiled her up and didn't have another problem.
     
  18. 1KPerDay

    1KPerDay Member

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    IMO the beretta will handle neglect better than the 226. the 226 has full length rails and isn't as ball-bearing smooth as the 92 thanks to its different locking mechanism. Plus I like the 226 so much I'd never run it without oil or grease. I've let it get dirty and have never had problems. but there's always been at least a little oil remaining.

    the beretta feels good even without any oil. maybe due to the anodizing/paint/whatever on the slide that may act as some sort of self-lubricant.
     
  19. The Lone Haranguer

    The Lone Haranguer Member

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    :scrutiny:
    Any pistol needs proper lubrication, but your friend makes it sound much worse than it really is. This doesn't happen unless the action totally rusted shut or something. It will certainly "run" for a shorter time unlubricated.
     
  20. zoom6zoom

    zoom6zoom Member

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    As said, it depends a lot on the quality of the lubrication, the environment, and if the lube was put in the correct places to start with.

    There is an excellent thread on SIG lubrication over on SIGforum which I highly recommend.
    http://sigforum.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/430601935/m/908103701
     
  21. Shipwreck

    Shipwreck Member

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    Better question... WHY?

    I want the gun to work. I use them for self defense. One of my 92s is my carry gun. I do not want to introduce any doubt as to the reliability of the gun. I keep it lubed to work 100%

    This whole topic is silly, personally. The gun has gone thru torture tests in the past - but running a metal framed gun with no lube is ridiculous
     
  22. balance 740

    balance 740 Member

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    I stated why I did it, to make sure the pistol would still function if the lube dried out after being carried for a while without adding any extra lube.

    EddieNFL stated an example of someone who forgot to add lube after cleaning the pistol. It happens to people sometimes.

    This is why.
     
  23. Shipwreck

    Shipwreck Member

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    I understand that - what I am saying is that I would never intentionally do it. And, I already assume that it (the gun) would not work when dry. I've been on the beretta forum since 2005, and I have nine 92s myself (and many more years ago)
     
  24. balance 740

    balance 740 Member

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    I think you have the best method of doing it Shipwreck. I do think the best thing to do is to keep the pistol lubed, no matter what pistol it is, and I would never intentionally carry a pistol without lube just for the heck of it.

    I was just saying that this is not always the case:

    I would assume that all of them would function like mine did, but I guess that is not always the case either with some of the reports in this thread. I don't know why mine worked fine while others didn't.
     
  25. brigadier

    brigadier Member

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    I HAD a Beretta 92FS that was stolen from me and still have a custom one in 10mm Auto.

    The Aluminum on the Beretta likes to get sticky and hold the slide in place under damp-cold weather. I was able to eliminate this problem by very slightly loosening the tolerances on the slide rails with a fine grit sandpaper. Without this fix, I can easily see any kind of stickiness or obstruction in the action causing it to stop up.

    The actual causes for allot of well known problems with firearms are very often different then the commonly believed cause, which is usually the result of only conventional thinking as opposed to careful study in to the problem.

    One of the most common examples is the separating of the Beretta slide, which is famously believed to be the result of a weak and flimsy slide, where the truth is that it was the result of a fatal imbalance in the slide configuration that has since been fixed.

    My experience is that most guns will work OK without lube for a decent amount of shots. However, synthetic frame guns, just by the nature of the material tend to be less sensitive to poor or no lube then steel or aluminum frame guns.

    Regarding the lubrication problem your friend described, I guess it depends to some degree upon how it's stored, what lube you use and how the lubrication was done, but I generally agree with him that if your gun has been sitting for over a month, the first thing you should do after clearing and checking the action is to clean and relube it regardless.
     
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