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9mm 147grn ball in G19

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by 357smallbore, Jul 18, 2019.

  1. 357smallbore

    357smallbore Member

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    I just was given 500 rounds of Winchester white box 9 mm ammunition. It's 147 grain ball ammo.
    I've never shot 147. I always use 115 or 124 for my practice.
    I don't believe it's going to be a problem shooting it out of the Glock 19 just curious if anybody else uses that heavy of a round for practice.
     
  2. saiga308

    saiga308 Member

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    i have some in reloaded rounds i am going to shoot some next time i get a chance say 150 yards see if they drop more then the 115 s
     
  3. JDR

    JDR Member

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    WWB will never be my first choice for factory ammo if I’m buying it, but I’d never turn it down if I were offered it for free. I like 147 gr. 9mm especially if I’m shooting one of my full size nines, like my STI Trojan 9mm 1911. But it shoots fine from a Glock 19, mine shoots well with everything I load it with.
     
  4. kidneyboy

    kidneyboy Member

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    I have shot thousands of 147gr boolits out of Glock 19s, 34s, 26s without issues.
     
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  5. Deanimator

    Deanimator Member

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    I won't even consider anything under 124gr. But then I don't have a velocity fetish when it comes to handgun ammunition.

    I carry nothing but 147gr. JHPs in my 9x19mm handguns (Glock 19 and Browning Hi Power).

    I find the Winchester White Box 147gr. JHPs to be excellent. They're completely reliable. I used them for the shooting exercise during my Ohio CHL class and found them monotonously accurate. After I shot the center out of the target, I proceeded to shoot out the NRA and copyright boilerplate around the periphery. I can't speak too highly of the stuff.
     
  6. Palolosj

    Palolosj Member

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    Why not? The British used 200gr .38 S&W in Webley and Enfield revolvers. Perhaps they understood handgun ballistics as well as those for sporting rifle cartridges?
     
  7. pblanc

    pblanc Member

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    Yes, I have shot some 147 grain FMJ with my Glock 19. No problems.
     
  8. johnmcl

    johnmcl Member

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    I think you are good to go, 357. Keep in my mind that the FBI is shooting 147s out of their issue G19s. If they like it, so should you.
     
  9. JR24

    JR24 Member

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    Probably notice it's got a little less recoil, that's about it. The tighter throat on the Gen 5s can lead to issues with fat, flat point, 147 grain reloads (IME) bit WWB has a round nose I believe so that's fine.

    My Glocks have eaten 147s for years, I only just switched to 124s recently for range and carry ammo because I have a Sig that likes faster ammo (accuracy wise) but my Glocks don't care
     
  10. RevolvingGarbage

    RevolvingGarbage Member

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    I think the idea is valid in that when you're working with a 9x19/.38S&W kind of case volume (not the same, but quite close), and a given and fairly high pressure ceiling (38kpsiish for 9x19 NATO spec), you can drive bullets of various weights to higher or lower velocity for a given purpose and still maintain a reasonably good ballistic effect. A very lightweight 9x19 round at high velocity has desirable characteristics for some applications, but certainly so does a bullet with the highest mass that can be stabilized by the barrel and muzzle velocity below but near the speed of sound.
     
  11. pblanc

    pblanc Member

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    When compared to 115 grain or 124 grain 9 mm Luger cartridges, 147 grain projectiles typically deliver a bit less kinetic energy but significantly greater momentum.
     
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  12. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    You might find the 147 strike higher on the target than 115s, but it will only show up as the range increases.
    I load mostly 147s for IDPA and USPSA but my Glocks' sights are regulated for 115s. So for Indoor GSSF, I shoot bulk 147s at the closer targets and 115s at the more distant ones. Or one, I can really only see a difference at 25 yards, 15 and in the groups overlap almost completely.
     
  13. Dave T

    Dave T Member

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    If you carry 147s for self defense, practicing with the same weight bullet makes eminent good sense.

    Dave
     
  14. Texas10mm

    Texas10mm Member

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    Almost all my 9mm loads are 147 gr or a bit higher. I shoot them in practice and in matches.
     
  15. Buzznrose

    Buzznrose Member

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  16. rskent

    rskent Member

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    Guess I have to go against the grain on this one. I don’t see me buying any more 124 or 147 grain 9mm anymore. The recoil characteristics are different enough to matter in how I shoot them. And to me, the 115 grain loads just shoot better. Lots of people say the heaver loads have less recoil. To me they seem like they have more. Maybe not more, just different. For me the gun lifts more with the heavier loads. And I don’t shoot them as well.

    Having said that, free ammo is free ammo.
     
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  17. JR24

    JR24 Member

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    Interesting, I feel just the opposite. 147s have the .45 ACP push feel to them.

    I know when I'm running timed drills and have had both my reloaded 124 and 147 back to back (loaded at 1150 and 950 fps, respectively) the difference in muzzle rise is significantly obvious in feel but negligible on the clock.

    I do find 115 and 124 group better for me out past 20 yards for whatever reason
     
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  18. Walt Sherrill

    Walt Sherrill Member

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    I don't reload, but saw the following tests at Lucky Gunner. It shows that heavier rounds tested performed better at 100 yards than lighter ones, even significantly faster rounds. It was interesting that some heavier standard velocity rounds -- like the Federal HST147 grain 9mm round, perform as well or better than the Speer Gold Dot .357 SIG round at that distance. (That result surprised the testers, one of whom was a big .357 SIG enthusiast.) As they remind us, it's about basic physics.

    The point they're making is simple, here posted from their article. The link is below.

    100-yd-pistol-velocity.jpg

    The heavier bullets are losing less velocity but they’re also losing a smaller percentage of that original velocity. It was 8% for those heavier bullets — the 230-grain .45 and the 147 HST. The others lost a lot more. The .357 Sig lost 20% of its velocity — something like 2-300 feet per second between the muzzle and 100 yards.​

    https://www.luckygunner.com/lounge/how-effective-is-pistol-ammo-at-100-yards/
     

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    Last edited: Jul 20, 2019
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  19. pblanc

    pblanc Member

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    Same diameter bullet, same cross sectional area, more projectile mass = better sectional density. Since sectional density is a primary factor in determining ballistic coefficient, it isn't too surprising that the heavier bullet does not slow down as quickly. Compared to the lighter 9 mm projectiles, 147 grain bullets typically start out with more momentum and hang on to it longer.

    Of course, in my case this is somewhat academic. I am doing well to hit anything at 25 yards, let alone 100 yards.
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2019
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  20. rskent

    rskent Member

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    I’ll pass on the push. I guess it won’t surprise anyone that I like 200 grain projectiles in 45acp better than 230 grain. Less push. Softer shooting. At least that how it feels to me.

    I guess it’s all pretty subjective. I can’t feel what you feel, and all that gooey stuff.
     
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  21. Mustangowner

    Mustangowner Member

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    If I carried 147 grain hollow points I would absolutely use 147 grain FMJ for practice... My Glock 19 actually LOVES 147 grain Winchester FMJ (a does my M9), I get far better accuracy out of them than anything else. Since I have so many 9mm's and I don't use any of them for defense though I just buy bulk 115 now for all of them.
     
  22. Spats McGee

    Spats McGee Moderator

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    When I first got my G19, I shot and carried 147s for maybe a year. I liked 'em just fine. My G19 liked 'em just fine. I switched to 124s for a handful of reasons, but there was never a problem with 147s.
     
  23. herrwalther

    herrwalther Member

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    I prefer 147gr for my 9mm handguns. Shouldn't be an issue with the Glock either.
     
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