9mm Resize Die

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Crazy Horse, Feb 4, 2020.

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  1. Waterboy3313

    Waterboy3313 Member

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    I will agree with that. I dislike everything about loading 9mm. Especially when using a single stage press. My funnel and reloading block don't work together and seating 9mm straight seams to require the spin and seat method especially with 115gr bullets. I do it even though it's probably more economical to buy bulk ammo.
     
  2. 9mmepiphany

    9mmepiphany Moderator Staff Member

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    If you try it you'll be surprised at how much less effort it takes. I'll here arguements that it isnt needed, but you'll never hear arguement that it isnt smoother.

    The important thing to remember is to let the carrier flash off before loading. Failure to do so would be the source of any complaints
     
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  3. DukeConnor

    DukeConnor Member

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    I will give it a try tomorrow.
     
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  4. LiveLife

    LiveLife Member

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    I now mainly load 9mm on Auto Breech Lock Pro using Lee dies with tapered carbide resizing die and lubing of brass isn't necessary.

    But I will agree that lubing any case for resizing will require less effort. :D:thumbup:

    I find Lee dies to have more radius at die opening (even carbide sizer ring) instead of sharp die opening to allow case mouth to enter the die better which would "move" the case instead of crushing/tilting the case. Also, this radius at die opening puts smoother resized finish instead of sharp scrape other dies do and perhaps radiused tapered carbide sizer is the reason why I haven't needed to lube my 9mm brass - https://www.thehighroad.org/index.p...lapsing-in-resizing-die.842078/#post-10936483

    9mm resizing scrapes made by other brand die

    [​IMG]

    9mm brass resized by Lee die with tapered carbide sizer showing no scrape mark

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2020
  5. rfwobbly

    rfwobbly Member

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    I place all my brass on a 2x2 foot plywood board, knock them all onto their sides, then spray them once from about 3 feet away. You don't need to dowse each pistol case. The lube will transfer to the die and be retained for use on several more cases. In this way the dies gets enough lubricant, but not so much that removal is required as a final step.
     
  6. PO2Hammer

    PO2Hammer Member

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    Not a big fan of Lee, but their 9mm resizing die is excellent.
    (The Lee 9mm seating die - not so much)
     
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  7. Bill M.

    Bill M. Member

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    You might go ahead and try a Redding die. They seem to generally be pretty slick.
     
  8. Dudedog
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    Dudedog Contributing Member

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    Might try lowering the pin a bit, mine works fine.
    I don't have to lube 9mm (using Lee die in a LNL progressive), but using some Frankford case lube makes it much easier to resize the cases and if I am doing 500 makes for less arm exercise:)
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2020
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  9. Ruger 15151

    Ruger 15151 Member

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    As mentioned, you don't need lube with carbide dies. However, it makes the whole process a lot smoother, especially if you wet tumble.
     
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  10. Kaldor

    Kaldor Member

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    I switched my Hornady drop to a RCBS PTX. Cost was $9. Works almost as good as an M-die. That allows me to run a bullet feeder and just hammer thru the 9mm. I use Hornady sizing die, Hornady drop with RCBS PTX, bullet feeder, Hornady seater, Lee FCD.
     
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  11. BC17A

    BC17A Member

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    How do you clean your brass? I originally started with Dawn and Lemi-shine but switched to a car wash/wax with Lemi-shine and have better results with sizing. I did a comparison between the two methods using 9mm brass as it seemed to be the hardest to resize and the car wash soap made a noticeable difference.
     
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  12. PO2Hammer

    PO2Hammer Member

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    Sounds like the decapping pin has moved up a bit under pressure.
    I had that trouble. Remove the pin from the die, degrease the pin and die with alcohol, reassemble, adjust, and lock that pin down tight.
     
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  13. FROGO207

    FROGO207 Member

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    Guess you guys have never sized 500 S&W OR 30 Carbine brass. 9 MM is a cake walk compared to these.;) I do notice my 9MM Lee sizing die does work harder than 380 or say 45 ACP but I don't see a big difference overall.
     
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  14. Crazy Horse

    Crazy Horse Member

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    As
    THX.

    I didn't know of other types of dies until I purchased Hornady and RCBS dies. Setting the depriming pin is much easier with those brands. Having to use 2 wrenches pulling each in the opposite direction to tighten the pin then to find out you didn't tighten it enough can be frustrating.

    That's why I'm now leaning more towards the dies with threads and a nut.

    I will say however that since all (6 sets) but two set of my dies are Lee dies, it's something I'll have to get used to.

    You cannot beat the cost of Lee dies, which is why I have so many, but now moving to the Hornady LNL AP I can see why there are differences in features between die makers.
     
  15. Crazy Horse

    Crazy Horse Member

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    Yep, tried the one shot. Much smoother now. I sprayed 100 cases and started reloading, real smooth compared to reloading 9mm without lube. And it does come out clean.

    Thank you all for the advice.
     
  16. Skgreen

    Skgreen Member

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    OT: I spray lube 9. The Hornady does a nice job w/o leaving a thick film, but as an aerosol, it's a bit more stinky (?) during the application.
    The RCBS pump bottle stuff is similar in effectiveness w/no odor to rile the Wife. But,,,,,,, at least in my experiences, I'm evidently using too much/not doing it right as I end up with a film afterwards.


    LNL-AP: Still on my original pawls, but I also admit it takes me far less effort to cycle the press today than when I started.
    I know it's 'the last thing you want to do as an owner of a new Progressive, but,,,, there is no shame in splitting up the entire process to get a better feel for several things.

    I often divide the entire process in half, requiring 2 passes through the press to complete a round instead of one. Dividing it up also has the pleasant side-effect of learning far more about your press than just how to crank out ammo.

    The 'feel and sound' of the process is far easier to absorb/diagnose if you split up a bit.

    'Diagnose' also includes learning the effects of making small adjustments and where to make them. (Small adjustments, like how to best avoid or otherwise deal with inconsistency's relative to the deflection of the sub-plate, etc)
    Be safe and HAVE FUN!
     
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  17. Crazy Horse

    Crazy Horse Member

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    I use a tumbler and walnut powder. It works really good, but it does come out dry. I have heard of wet cleaning, but it seems a little messier with waste water also you have to let the cases dry. using the tumbler, I don't have to lay them out to dry.
     
  18. Crazy Horse

    Crazy Horse Member

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    Iv'e head and seen the positive reviews. But Redding dies are double the cost of other manufacturer dies. Maybe one day I'll break down and get a set of Redding dies, but at double the cost.....The thought process the last time turned out to the cost one set of Redding dies vs the cost of a set of Hornady Dies and a Set of RCBS dies. I chose the latter option as it was cheaper.
     
  19. Hondo 60
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    Hondo 60 Member

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    Another lube vote here.
    It just makes it so buttery smooth.
     
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  20. 9mmepiphany

    9mmepiphany Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes, you have waste water which you throw away...in dry tumbling you're keep all the waste products in your media.

    The way I wet tumble, even accounting for drying time, it takes less time than dry tumbling...just over 2 hours per load
     
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  21. 9mmepiphany

    9mmepiphany Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes, you have waste water which you throw away...in dry tumbling you're keep all the waste products in your media.

    The way I wet tumble, even accounting for drying time, it takes less time than dry tumbling.
     
  22. Tilos

    Tilos Member

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    Spray/soak the lube, any lube, on 2 30cal patches, put 'em an empty plastic tub, add the brass, cover it, swirl/tumble it around for 30sec/1 minute...done.
    I don't use any special lube, just oil/lube I have on hand that I consider to be the right viscosity.
    Have even used Bag Balm a time or two, as it's mostly Lanolin.
    If you can see the lube on the cases, you have used too much:scrutiny:.

    None of the lube will get into the inside of the case/primer pocket, just the outside...and on the open edge, to be lube for the expander.
    I leave the moistened patches in the tub or Zip Lok bag for the next batch, adding lube to them when needed.

    All the "sucked back in" primers I have experienced are on range brass with crimped primers:scrutiny:.
    Tapering the primer pin down to half it's diameter at about the same angle as a sharpened pencil and then balling the end will reduce primer sticking, by a lot.
    All that is done spinning the pin in a hand-drill and reshaping the end with a hard stone.

    Checkout the tip in my sig line, will get you out of trouble when a primer gets sucked back in.
    :thumbup:
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2020
  23. FTG-05

    FTG-05 Member

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    What language is this and what does it mean?

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  24. LiveLife

    LiveLife Member

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    Not sure how you are wet tumbling but my dry tumbling with Cabela's (Berry's 400) vibratory tumbler and NuFinish treated fine grit walnut media from Harbor Freight will clean 600-800 9mm brass with shine (clean/shiny enough for reloading without gunking up the dies) in about 15-20 minutes.

    I can then immediately reload with slight residual polymer on brass surface acting as lube to resize smoothly.

    And another benefit of dry tumbling with liquid polish is residual polish will prevent tarnishing of brass surface for several months to years.

    With that said, I am setting up to wet tumble rifle brass.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2020
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  25. LiveLife

    LiveLife Member

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    It's braille - https://www.brailletranslator.org/

    In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock - Thomas Jefferson​
     
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