Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

A question about after dry firing Ruger 22/45 MKIII.

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by efeng9622, Aug 23, 2007.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. efeng9622

    efeng9622 Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2005
    Messages:
    274
    Location:
    Maryland
    I was using a snap cap to dry fire my Ruger 22/45 MKIII , But I found it is hard to pull bolt out than before dry firing, I should use a bigger force to pull bolt out. but I like to know if this kind of pulling can damage the gun and what can I do to release the tight bolt? I don't dry fire very often , but I like to know the reason.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Technosavant

    Technosavant Member

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2005
    Messages:
    2,011
    Location:
    St. Louis, MO
    The reason it takes more effort to retract the bolt after dry firing is because the hammer has fallen and you are recocking it as you pull the bolt back. It's perfectly normal and you aren't hurting anything.
     
  3. sig226

    sig226 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2007
    Messages:
    229
    Location:
    Palm Beach County
    You can do this to the Ruger .22 pistols all you want and it won't hurt them. In fact, you have to dry fire them to take them apart for cleaning. You don't actually need the snap cap on the Rugers.

    THIS IS IMPORTANT: Don't do it on any other brand of .22 rifle, pistol, or revolver. In almost all other makes, the firing pin will bang into the edge of the firing chamber and damage the chamber wall. It might also crack the firing pin on older guns.

    You can safely do it to any modern centerfire handgun because the firing pin won't hit anything if the gun is not loaded. You shouldn't do it to older guns because the steel is brittle. The cartridge actually softens the impact of the hammer to the frame. Without the cartridge, or snap cap, it can damage the hammer and the frame.

    You should not dry fire shotguns as the hammer strikes with significantly more force and can damage the locks. This is especially true of over/under guns and side by sides.

    Ordinarily I would say Blast Away, but in this case I guess it should be Click Away!
     
  4. W.E.G.

    W.E.G. Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2006
    Messages:
    7,395
    Location:
    all over Virginia
    sig226, can you elaborate on why there is no risk of damage from
    extensive dry-firing a Ruger MK III rimfire semi-auto pistol?

    Does your comment apply to earlier Ruger semi-autos too?
     
  5. Car Knocker

    Car Knocker Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2002
    Messages:
    3,809
    Location:
    Salt Lake City, UT
    As I recall, the manual for my Ruger MK II states that it is permissible to dry-fire because there is a firing pin stop that prevents the firing pin from striking the rim recess of the chamber.
     
  6. Kruzr

    Kruzr Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2002
    Messages:
    1,041
    Location:
    Surf City, PRK
    Ruger Mark II's and III's have a pin that goes through the bolt and through a hole in the firing pin. It prevents the firing pin from hitting the chamber opening.

    Mark II's and early Mark III's used a solid pin. Now Mark III's use a roll pin.
     
  7. 10-Ring

    10-Ring Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    12,037
    Location:
    California
    I was always taught NEVER DRY FIRE A 22lr RIMFIRE firearm and then a I bought a Ruger Mk II Slabside gov't model & it's just apart of normal cleaning to dryfire the little bugger :rolleyes: Oh well :rolleyes: :D
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page