A Question Was Asked In Another Forum About Smith 27s

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by DPris, Feb 17, 2019.

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  1. DM~

    DM~ Member

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    I think I've owned 5 Pythons, and not one of them would hold a candle to the pre M-27 and old M-27 that I still own. The Pythons have been long ago sent down the road and I don't miss them one bit!!

    DM
     
  2. sgt127

    sgt127 Member

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    It’s the direct line descendant of the original .357 Magnum.

    Every other .357 caliber gun came later.
     
  3. mavracer

    mavracer Member

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    I really like my 28 but I' not getting rid of my Python.
     
  4. DM~

    DM~ Member

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    A 28 sure isn't a 27!! I've owned a number of 28's too...

    DM
     
  5. cfullgraf

    cfullgraf Member

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    While the Model 27 is probably overkill for a 357 Magnum, I own a 6" and a 8-3/8" Model 27. I would not have it any other way. They are nice shooting revolvers.

    I'll agree with some others that the S&W M586/M686 revolvers are some awesome 357 Magnum revolvers and I would rather carry a 4" L frame over a 4" N frame. But for longer range work, you cannot fault the longer barrel Model 27's.

    Someday, when my ship comes in, I'll own a 38-44 S&W N frame. There is something special about shooting 38 Special in a revolver chambered for 38 Special.:)
     
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  6. MachIVshooter

    MachIVshooter Member

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    No exception. Pythons, like most Colts, are overrated and way overpriced. I'll take a prelock L or N frame over a Python every time.
     
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  7. lightman

    lightman Member

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    Its a Classy looking revolver built at a time when Craftsmen took pride in their work, and it shows. It shoots well and handles the recoil well. I don't own 27 but I have a few "N" frames.
     
  8. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

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    My answer would be one of the following................

    Blank stare accompanied by "I don't even understand that question."

    or

    "If you asked me that via social media, I'd block you immediately."

    or

    "Paint chips huh?"
     
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  9. DPris

    DPris Member Emeritus

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    :D
    Denis
     
  10. Master Blaster

    Master Blaster Member

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    Cable Ties look much better on a Python than they do on a model 27.
     
  11. westernrover

    westernrover Member

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    It's the craftsmanship from a bygone era that appeals to me in the Registered Magnums and the .357 Magnum (pre-Model 27), the early Model 27's and maybe the 27-2. If you study the revolver, it has features like the fully-checkered top-strap that was not just investment-cast or cut by a CNC machine, but by an individual craftsman. Look at the 6 or later 12-line grooves on the backstrap and the front of the grip frame. A lot of the Registered Magnums had curved lines machined into the sides of the hammer to reduce friction and galling. Of course the hammer spurs are hand-checkered. The barrels are pinned instead of crush-fit or sleeved. The cylinders are cut with recessed chambers so the case heads, even the rims are fully supported. All the parts are forged and hand fit. And the polishing and blueing are impeccable. Even if it didn't work flawlessly, it would be one of the most beautiful revolvers ever made with every functional detail imaginable lavished on it while not embellishing it with anything vain or useless like engraved fleur de lis or jeweling. But it does work flawlessly and with a ruggedness the Python could never match. The design brief for every revolver since has basically been to take the RM/357M/27 and eliminate functional features you don't "need" in order to lower costs and increase profits. We've found ways to accomplish a lot of the same things with a piece of plastic, a MIM part, or some other shortcut. The Registered Magnums stand as an unsurpassed example of when a manufacturer took no shortcuts.
     
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  12. DM~

    DM~ Member

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    standard.jpg

    standard.jpg

    DM
     
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  13. Gordon
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    Gordon Contributing Member

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    P1010496_zps0acf946f.jpg
    5 inch 1969 one , quick cell phone shot from out of safe. It is as new, I don't carry or shoot it, I keep it oiled with ballistol and eventually when price reaches the right point , Ill sell it. It meanwhile is faithfully waiting just in case. A Mechanical Jewel, only the Registered Magnums excell it in workmanship
     
  14. PapaG

    PapaG Member

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    I'd have to say that an original, "registered" 357 is one of the finest revolvers made. I have had exactly one and miss it every time I shoot my 28, Security Six, or 686(which ain't bad and has that extra hole).
     
  15. bikemutt

    bikemutt Member

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    This is very shallow thinking I know but, if S&W had put me in charge of 27 design, I would've used a 29 barrel and under-bored it for 357. The frame-to-barrel taper is the one thing that bugs me, just a tiny bit. I own a 5" 27-2 so it's not a deal killer, just a wish. To me, the 29 is the finest-looking wheel gun around, I just don't have the constitution for a steady diet of 44 mag.
     
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  16. DM~

    DM~ Member

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    Who says you have to put full power loads through a M-29 all the time??

    DM
     
  17. bikemutt

    bikemutt Member

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    Very true DM~.

    I have a model 69 in 44 mag now, it's my woods gun so it gets carried more the shot. Back when I had a real nice 29-2 44 special ammo was hard to find and expensive, sometime more expensive than 44 magnum.

    I do hand load for bottleneck rifle cartridges only, I just don't do enough handgun shooting to where I feel inclined to hand load for them.

    Maybe I should re-think my position, I do love the 29-2.
     
  18. cfullgraf

    cfullgraf Member

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    If you are already loading for rifle, adding dies and a shell holder to load a handgun cartridge is not very expensive when compared to the cost of factory ammunition.

    Loading a box or two of 44 Special here and there does not take very long and will allow you to have good, economic ammunition for your 29-2.

    Granted, I treat hand loading as a hobby unto itself, but when I buy a new-to-me cartridge gun, the next purchase is a set of dies and some components regardless of how much I plan to shoot it. You never know when ammunition will become hard to find.

    But everyone values their leisure time differently.
     
  19. Rock185

    Rock185 Member

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    My response would probably be, "If you have to ask...".
    I actually like guns that are over built for the caliber, for instance 9mm and 38 Super 1911s, S&W Performance Center 9MMs built on the .40 cal. frame and slide, and N-Frame .357s;) 27 (800x600).jpg
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2019
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  20. bikemutt

    bikemutt Member

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    Thanks cfullgraf, you've managed to convince a handgun reloading skeptic to take a walk on the "wild side":)

    Your note concerning ammo availability is particularly poignant.

    I'll be shopping for 44 special dies and components this weekend.
     
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  21. Drail

    Drail Member

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    I predict that you will love the .44 Spl.
     
  22. Reloadron
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    Reloadron Contributing Member

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    During your shopping expedition make sure the dies you buy, if you want to load 44 Special you get dies like the RCBS #18612 which include the spacer for loading 44 Mag & 44 Special. Just using those as an example and it's nice if your dies include an additional seater plug for loading both SWC and RN type bullets.

    Ron
     
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  23. Dave T

    Dave T Member

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    In the summer of 1973 I entered the academy to become a deputy sheriff. At that time the department required deputies purchase their own weapons. Specifications were a 4" S&W or Colt DA revolver chambered for 38 Special or 357 Magnum. I had been reading Skeeter Skelton's stuff for a while by then so I asked if I could carry a 5" M-27. I was told no, it would be too long setting in a vehicle, it had to be a 4". I then asked if I could carry a 3.5" M-27. By then they were getting tired of me and said no again, 4" barrel only.

    Most of the recruits were buying 4" M-19s. One guy bought a Python and another a M-15 S&W. I joined the minority crowd and bought a 4" M-28. Once I was out of the academy and on the street I was told I could carry anything I wanted to, as long as I qualified with it. The sergeant who told me that was carrying a M-58.

    Eventually I did get a 5" pre 27 and a couple 3.5" versions. One a dash 2 and the other a M-27 no dash. They are all gone now. For recreational purposes I own S&W Heavy Duties, a 4" and a pre-War 5". I load my own 38-44 rounds and imagine what it was like to be a deputy between 1930 and 1935. (smile)

    Dave
     
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  24. bc1023

    bc1023 Member

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    Neither of them are close to the finest, but that’s ok. :)

    The 27 has a lot of history, since it’s the ancestor of the great Registered Magnum. That was definitely one of the finest 357 Mags ever built.
     
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  25. bc1023

    bc1023 Member

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    There’s nothing overpriced about them. That’s market value. They sell for that amount every day.

    It’s not like it’s a new gun priced above its target market. It’s the market that determines the Python’s value, nothing else.
     
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