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Acceptable tolerance in a '51 colt

Discussion in 'Blackpowder' started by lostapiarist, Jun 30, 2008.

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  1. lostapiarist

    lostapiarist Member

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    I was wondering what kind of tolerances are acceptable between the cylinder and the barrel on a '51 colt replica. I can see day light though mine, it isnt much and expect there to be a little as they take apart right there, but I am wondering when it becomes problematic. Thanks
     
  2. arcticap

    arcticap Member

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  3. lostapiarist

    lostapiarist Member

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    Thanks for the direction, much appreciated.
     
  4. scrat

    scrat Member

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    yep thats a good post. What you have to remember is there really is no actuall proper measurement. these guns were originally made for use during the civil war and conflicts with native indians and others. The common soldier had no way of measuring the air gap. Common method was to drive the wedge in until you could not spin the cylinder then back it out about 1/16 of an inch so that it could be spun. However again how would the common soldier be able to measure a 1/16 of an inch. They didnt. they used common judgement. Thus the more you use your gun the better you will be able to get used to and gain the experience needed to make proper judgements.
     
  5. Curator

    Curator Member

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    Shooting my Pietta 1860 Army in competition, I have found that the best way to insure repeatable accuracy, point of impact, and reliability (cylinder not jamming) was to use an .006 automobile feeler gauge. (the ones we used to adjust the rocker arms and tappets on automoblie engines like 1955 Chevys)

    I put the hammer on half cock, screw the "wedge screw" in all the way so it doesn't interfere, and slide the feeler gauge between cylinder face and barrel while tapping in the wedge. Once I get a nice friction fit, I bring out the wedge screw to contact the little shelf on the wedge and hold the adjustment. If your wedge is battered it won't hold any kind of accurate barrel cylinder gap and accuracy will suffer.
     
  6. scrat

    scrat Member

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    Curator for competition i am sure that is the best method. however back in 1860 the common gunslinger did not have feeler guages. Same time i am sure there were plenty of competitions and shootings. People had to get used to the gun and used the method i wrote as that was the most common method. I am sure that there were a bunch of Men who just put the wedge in to a certain mark and that was good to them. However that certain area that mark. it had to be figured out. The op needs to get out there and get used to the gun. use both methods if they wish. i imagine in the end many people will opt to not using a feeler guage and use the wedge stop, then back out method
     
  7. Smokin_Gun

    Smokin_Gun Member

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    You simply push the wedge in snug and if it free spins it's good.
    I would and doubt if anyone else would:
    I'd never drive a wedge in to a Colt, tap would be acceptable.

    Have seen factory Colt Rev have to be driven out before shot. Or worse yet not driven out then shot, (deformed wedge, bulged barrel assy slot, ect.) these have to be driven out.

    SG
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2008
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