Ammo can storage???

Discussion in 'Shooting Gear and Storage' started by theboyscout, Jul 1, 2017.

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  1. theboyscout

    theboyscout Member

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  2. JeffG

    JeffG Member

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    If you are thinking longer term storage, I would suggest desiccant packs, and plastic bags for liners, or put your ammo in food grad zipper lock bags. If the cans are metal, do not set them on concrete, use wooden or plastic blocks under the cans. Take a look at the bottom of the cans, if the paint is in need of touch up, do it.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2017
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  3. Hanzo581

    Hanzo581 Member

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    I usually just check to make sure the seals are still in good shape, throw in some desiccant packs and call it a day. I have some that are loose rounds, some boxed and some plastic bagged. They all do fine.
     
  4. John Joseph

    John Joseph Member

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    If your ammo is commercially manufactured I leave it in the original packaging on the off chance of being recalled---you'll want positive ID of the lot numbers involved.
     
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  5. theboyscout

    theboyscout Member

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    Thank you, I order my ammo through trident weaponry it comes bagged and that's how I will leave it water tight thanks
     
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  6. RPZ

    RPZ Member

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    Regardless of outer storage/carrier; for longterm storage I would invest in a Foodsaver, throw in a silica gel pack with individual boxes, or more, or add larger gel packs to larger packs of ammo. Now you have waterproof individual packs of ammo which if stored in a cool place, or relatively, will likely last a long long time.
     
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  7. ColtPythonElite

    ColtPythonElite Member

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    I lots of ammo in cans. I just toss it in and close it. I have two cans of surplus ammo that I bought around 1990 and never got around to shooting. It has been in my basement. The ammo still looks like it did when I put it in. I see no need for gel packs, plastic bags, food savers or anything else as long as your can has a good seal. Put the ammo in dry and it will stay dry.
     
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  8. RPZ

    RPZ Member

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    You can write the manufacturer's packaging description and lot # on your outer layer with indelible marker or laminated card, or both.
     
  9. CapnMac

    CapnMac Member

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    That's not a bad price for those cans, as long as the shipping was reasonable.

    I've never had an issue with cans, and have stored ammo within loose, in MTM boxes, retail cardboard, and the like. Least best was hand-filled ziplock bags, but that was from humidity trapped in the bags.
    Mind, as noted above, my cans have never been on bare concrete, and have good paint on the bottoms.
     
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  10. BSA1

    BSA1 member

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    I lined the inside of some of my ammo cans with cardboard just to eliminate the rattle from loose rounds and check to make sure the rubber seal in the lid is good. Then I just add ammo, close the lid and stack it with the others.

    Some of the ammo in my cans have been in long term storage for 25 years and the ammo looks just as fresh as the day I brought them. I also don't set my can directly on the concrete basement floor. I built a simple wood pallet with 2 x 4's from scraps in my wood bin.

    FYI; These USGI metal can come in useful for storing other things. I have 2 .50 caliber cans full of spare magazines, 10 30 round AR magazines stack nicely in the .50 caliber can with a few inches to spare for misc. small stuff like a few boxes of ammo. 15 round 9mm and 1911 magazines fit perfectly crossways in a 50 caliber can which holds a lot of magazines.

    I have a total of 16 30 and 50 caliber ammo cans and will add at least a couple more that next time I go to a gun show. I just keep finding more stuff to put in them.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2017
  11. ColtPythonElite

    ColtPythonElite Member

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    Mine sit on bare concrete. Never a problem.
     
  12. Hanzo581

    Hanzo581 Member

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    Yeah, can someone explain the no concrete floor thing?
     
  13. BSA1

    BSA1 member

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    Bare concrete can allow water to wick up from the moisture in the supporting ground. This is actually pretty common in homes and offices with a concrete slab floor. It is particularly common in basements as they are below ground level.

    Another concern is flooding. Anyone who has had their sump pump quit working during heavy rain has had to deal with this. Everything that is touching the floor has to be moved and dried out.

    Wicking will allow moisture to become trapped between the floor and bottom on the ammo can. It the case of metal ammo cans this can cause it to rust. Wicking can be solved by sealing the concrete floor. There are several products that do this. As I have 16 full ammo cans stacked it is a lot of heavy work to move all of them to dry the bottom cans and floor out. A 2" x 4" pallet avoids wicking problems altogether.

    Flood damage can only be prevented by raising everything up off the floor. Other than some empty boxes I no longer have anything directly sitting on the floor. Boxes sit on 2" x 4"s and shelves.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2017
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  14. Sunray

    Sunray Member

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    Real ammo cans are air and water tight. The rubber gasket on the rim does it. No need for desiccant(that needs replacing/renewing regularly). Isn't cheap either.
     
  15. Hanzo581

    Hanzo581 Member

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    The desiccant might be overkill, but they aren't really expensive, plus all it's doing is removing the moisture that was in the air when you closed it. So you wouldn't need to swap them.

    https://www.amazon.com/Gram-Silica-Packets-Desiccant-Dehumidifiers/dp/B00DYKTS9C/
     
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  16. theboyscout

    theboyscout Member

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    The sale now was 8.99 I just got a price adjustment
     
  17. CapnMac

    CapnMac Member

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    Yep. my buy point for cal..30 cans is $5-6; for .50s is $8-9--unless they are rare or unusual (side-opening 50s; tombstone ot double-depth fifties; USN marked 30s, and such like.
    I've gotten rid of most of my 20mm cans, they just get too heavy too quickly.
    I keep an eye out for the six-latch clamshell medical service cases--they are hugely convenient and will fit under a bed.
     
  18. FN in MT

    FN in MT Member

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    Just saw that Selway Armory here in MT had Fat Fifty cans for $9 each. They are made in CHINA, which I don't care for, but tried a few anyway. Look the same as a GI can, same seal, closure, etc. FAR cheaper than any fat fifties we see at gun shows. Since the intial sale thy are now up to $9.99.

    I luckily had the opportunity 15 yrs back to get cans from Hill AFB when a buddy bought a few pallets of them. I paid $2 each for normal fifties and a buck each for the skinny .30 cans. All used, but clean and rust free. I think I did fifty of each. SO HAPPY to have them.
     
  19. John Joseph

    John Joseph Member

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    The original packaging with the lot #s is positive ID
     
  20. loose noose

    loose noose Member

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    I live in an exceptionally dry climate here in southern Nevada, however I do have several metal military ammo cans, mostly .30 caliber (stored on the concrete floor in my garage for 20+years), but mostly I have the inexpensive plastic cans that I purchased at Wal Mart and they hold an a lot of different caliber types of ammo. Never had any problem with any of my ammo discharging when needed.
     
  21. Atla

    Atla Member

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  22. Hanzo581

    Hanzo581 Member

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  23. Atla

    Atla Member

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    Heh, that's what I thought.
     
  24. Riomouse911

    Riomouse911 Member

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    I have thousands of factory and reloaded rifle and handgun rounds stored loosely in ammo cans, I have others with loaded AR and mini 14/30 mags, and some (.22 LR and .22 mag) still in their factory packaging.

    I have them stacked on the bottom shelf of a heavy duty steel storage rack, so they're off the floor. I've used no dessicant so far.

    After 15+ years of using this method, I have yet to see any issues with the rounds in any of the calibers.
     
  25. hdwhit

    hdwhit Member

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    I use dessicant packs in all of my ammunition cans. Since the can is sealed, the desiccant pack just needs to lower the moisture content within the sealed environment of the can, so a 2 gram bag can be adequate - and quite reasonably priced. I have used this seller before. I pay a little extra to get the bags that change color when they get saturated which makes periodic inspection easy.

    http://silicagelpackets.com/silica-gel-packets/silica-gel-packets-cotton-tyvek-sachets-dry-packs/dry-packs-silica-gel-packets-tyvek-sachets/
     
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