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Ankle pistol

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by kestak, Jun 19, 2016.

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  1. kestak

    kestak Member

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    Greetings,

    I gotta look for a backup handgun for ankle. Any tips or suggestions? I will have to carry it for 12 hours shifts(and before quAlify on it of course.).

    Thank you
     
  2. L-2

    L-2 Member

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    I have four which I can use for ankle carry:
    -Glock 43
    -S&W 642
    -S&W 640 Pro
    -Glock 26 (I actually have a G26gen3 and a G26gen4, so I suppose I really have five which I could carry on my ankle)

    The S&W J-frames get the most ankle use. I usually carry the G43 with a body armor holster. The G26 is a bit large, but i have carried it on the ankle.
     
  3. MedWheeler

    MedWheeler Member

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    Been many moons since I jockeyed a B&W. The first few years, it was a .38 snub down there. Later, it was a PPK/S.

    I didn't have the lightweight, polymer-framed options that exist today, and the current choices are nearly endless. I'd probably send a proven Ruger LCP down there if I re-joined the ranks tomorrow.
     
  4. VA27

    VA27 Member

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    If you're going to be involved in foot pursuits you'll want the lightest thing you can find. If not, the sky's the limit.

    With a poly 32/380 or airweight J frame you can get away with a less expensive holster. If you go steel J frame or a larger heavier gun you'll want the best fitted holster you can find.

    Oddly enough after a week or so you'll get used to even a relatively heavy gun. In the past I've carried an H&K P7M8 and replaced that with a G19 when they first became available. I haven't tried it, but with a proper holster I think a 1911 would be doable.
     
  5. GRIZ22

    GRIZ22 Member

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    One problem "the lightest you can find" has is you might lose the gun and not know it. I found no issues carrying a steel frame Model 60, 640, or PPK in an ankle rig. I agree the G26 is a bit bulky but can be carried in an ankle rig.
     
  6. TRX

    TRX Member

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    I've been carrying an LCP in an ankle holster for several years now. If my shoes are on, so is the holster.

    Ankle holsters are available in left or right hand. Or leg... most assume you're going to lift your pants with the hand on that side, then cross-draw. I've found it's easier to lift my pants with the offhand and pull with the gunside hand. In my opinion, they have the butt pointing the wrong way for getting hold of the gun, no matter which hand you use to draw - I've decided I prefer the butt pointing forward instead of back.

    If access to the gun while behind the steering wheel is important, you might want to wear the gun on the right leg, no matter what hand you use to draw with.

    It took me a few weeks to get fully comfortable with an ankle holster; it's amazing how many items you can wind up banging the gun into even when it's on the inside of an ankle. Like a belt or shoulder holster, eventually you get used to it.

    The poor Ruger collects an *astonishing* amount of dirt, even when I'm not pushing the lawnmower.

    Oh, and you want a holster with a calf strap to hold it up. Otherwise it'll just ride down and try to push your shoe off as you walk. At least, that's what happened to me. Some companies make you pay extra for the strap.

    No, it's not easy or quick to get the gun out. But if you're wearing long pants, you can ankle carry invisibly, with no worries about tight clothing, huggers, or thick-bolstered seats.
     
  7. kestak

    kestak Member

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    Anyone got a bersa thunder combat,thunder plus or ultra compact pro? I look at the Glock, but I think my mind would be more at ease with a thumb safety for down there. Also did anyone who served had any problem with ankle pistol and fights with perps?
     
  8. usp9

    usp9 Member

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    A gun carried on an ankle is hard to effectively conceal. It has to be pretty small or else they readily print on the pant leg. Get a good holster, don't skimp. Don't expect a fast draw. Practice the draw, it isn't a natural movement.
     
  9. Fiv3r

    Fiv3r Member

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    I've never had good luck with ankle/boot draw, but if I were to give it a go again, I'd stick with something super thin and light like an LCP or Pico.

    I've often thought about getting a NAA .22 mag as a back up boot gun to my edc.
     
  10. GBExpat

    GBExpat Member

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    The only pistol that I ever ankle-carry is my Kel-Tec P3-AT.
     
  11. L-2

    L-2 Member

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    You're wasting our time. This should have been your question from the start.
     
  12. GRIZ22

    GRIZ22 Member

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    I've been using ankle holsters for over 40 years. You need to carry the gun on your weak side on the inside of your leg. If the gun is on the outside you will find it banging into things. This also gives you easy access to the gun when seated or if you are right handed when driving. The best way to draw is to drop to your strong side knee, lift your pants wit your weak hand, and draw with your strong hand. I've been a firearms instructor for about 40 years (almost 30 as a LE instructor) and this is the only stable method of drawing from an ankle holster. I've seen all kinds of dancing around, lifting legs, and a bunch of other methods used and this is what I've found works.

    Ankle rigs are not my preferred method of carry but sometimes is the best option available.
     
  13. Old Dog

    Old Dog Member

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    Concur with previous poster, GRIZ22.

    I experimented with vest carry (didn't like the unwieldy draw, having to open shirt, back pocket carry (not comfy for sitting in vehicles), cargo pocket carry (a stable holster just took up too much room, and again, the draw was slow and awkward) and eventually settled on ankle holster carry for a back-up gun. Did have to go from 8" boots to "mid" height models.

    Currently using a SIG P-938; had used an Airweight J for years, went to the SIG P-238, but just feel more comfortable with 9mm, so sacrificed and went to a heavier pistol. 1911 style with a thumb-safety, as the OP seems to desire.

    Whatever one chooses for ankle carry is a lot of compromise. I opted for an effective, accurate pistol with excellent sights in an ergonomic, yet heavier package.
     
  14. Warp

    Warp Member

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    What is your primary?
     
  15. MedWheeler

    MedWheeler Member

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    When I was on the job (as mentioned), I found that the all-steel guns, carried in firm holsters equipped with calf-straps, gave me no issues whatsoever. I was involved in some pretty good H2H struggles, foot pursuits, and virtually all the other rigors associated with street patrol. Never had the ankle gun come loose (I did have to stop momentarily during one such pursuit to retrieve a heavy, clunky, BU revolver that was thrown from another officer's cheap ankle rig as he and I chased a guy down a hospital corridor.)

    Some officers have concern over the possibility of things like safety levers or magazine releases being inadvertently actuated during such duty (it is easy to accidentally kick the gun with the other foot, such as when entering/exiting the cruiser.) Those concerns were among some of the things guiding George Kelgren when he developed the Grendel P10, a pistol directly marketed to my department for such consideration (a bunch of us got them on a PO; had there been an ankle holster that worked for its odd shape, I might have so carried mine.) Revolvers don't have this issue. My second ankle gun was a PPK/S, carried hammer down and safety off. Worn on my right leg, the safety lever was more exposed, but still never actuated. I don't think it's as much of an issue with a quality firearm in a quality, well-applied rig.

    I own a Bersa Thunder. It's not the "CC" version, and I'd find it too large for ankle duty. A gun the size of my Kel-Tec PF9 would probably ride better down there. My P32 might be too small for me to retrieve effectively from down there; I'd carry that in a pocket.
     
  16. kestak

    kestak Member

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    My primary is G22.

    Good thing is that I am not in a hurry, so I am testing a few things and read a lot.
    The Ankle Galco holsters even make me reconsider for a Glock down there. :)
     
  17. Murphys Law

    Murphys Law Member

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    Its been a very long time since I carried a S&W model 36 "Chiefs Special" in an ankle holster. Ankle carry has several drawbacks.

    1, If you really need the BUG your giving up needed mobility by dropping down to one knee, to draw it, at the worst possible time.

    2, The gun is always in the weather or environment. Every puddle you step through, every rainy or snowy day, sand, dirt, even small gravel, etc. will get get into your holster and firearm.
    This will require a higher level of maintenance, such as removing the gun from the holster at the end of the shift to wipe it down and let it dry out. On extreme days you will have to remove the cartridges to let them dry out as well. (Nickel plated cases can help with this somewhat)

    3, One of the best things you wear is a good pair of tactical boots that protects your ankle and tendon. Especially while climbing in and out of auto wrecks, sliding down embankments, hopping fences while chasing somebody, falling through substandard flooring, etc. The boots will most likely cause your ankle holster to print substantially.

    After a few years I changed tactics and wore a stainless Walther PPK in a shoulder holster under my uniform shirt. I wasn't going to worry about buttons if I needed it. Just rip the shirt open.

    You are fortunate in that today, there are compact 9mm's that are the same size and weight as my old .380 PPK

    WARP has asked what is your primary weapon? You should be carrying the same brand and type as your primary ie. If your primary is a Glock 19 then you should pick a Glock 43 or 26. or even another 19 :)
     
  18. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

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    kestak

    Somebody (I think it may have been Mas Ayoob), had a technique for an ankle holster draw where you basically fell backwards on your rear end, lifted your pant leg with your free hand, and drew your gun as you ended up on your back.

    As to choice of gun I would go with something small, lightweight, and with a double action trigger, like a S&W Model 638 or a KelTec P3AT.
     
  19. GRIZ22

    GRIZ22 Member

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    bannockburn, I remember reading that too. If you wind up laying on your back that severely restricts your mobility vs the method I state in post #12. You ain't moving anywhere fast if your laying on your back.
     
  20. tactikel

    tactikel Member

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    Before you decide on a holster/pistol combo have you ever worn an ankle holster? All but the lightest BUG will weigh 16-28 oz loaded with holster. Buy a 2 pound ankle weight and wear it at work for a week of 12 hour shifts. Try running with it. Still want one? IMHO the lightest gun possible is best. A KelTec P32 or PAT3 is ideal, as strictly a BUG.
     
  21. Terminatorret

    Terminatorret Member

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    I wear cowboy boots almost exclusively. If you wear big barrel boots (the top of the boot is big and loose) like me, you will find ankle carry most comfortable and secure. I wear Wrangler blue jeans with the loose barrel boots (Tony Lama) and printing is not a factor.
    I use the Galco Ankle Lite holsters. I carry either a S&W Model 36, a DB380 or a 9x18 P-64 always matching the caliber of my primary weapon. Believe it or not, the P-64 fits very nicely in the Galco J-frame ankle holster.
    There are occasions when the ankle carry IS my primary and only carry option. Ankle carry is not my first choice, but sometimes it is my only choice and I don't bat an eye to utilize it.
    Unlike some who conceal carry and build a wardrobe around their carry weapon of choice, I get dressed first, then decide where and how my CCW will hide best.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2016
  22. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

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    GRIZ22

    It's been awhile since I read the article but I think one of the reasons for the back side ankle draw was for scenarios where you were extremely close to your assailant. By falling backwards you now have moved your chest and head out of striking distance. You can also see them in front of you versus trying to complete an ankle holster draw with both of your hands tied up with no way to defend yourself. With being on your back you can also keep them temporarily at bay with your free leg while you complete your draw and bring your gun on target. Yes the back side technique would restrict your movements but the kneeling position also puts you in a similar stationary position as well.
     
  23. GRIZ22

    GRIZ22 Member

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    Bannockburn, I can see fall in on your back under the conditions you stated. If the assailant is armed with a knife you are less likely to take a fatal wound in the leg. Familiar with this as a ground fighting position in martial arts.
     
  24. MedWheeler

    MedWheeler Member

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    I was in the gun store yesterday, and found a mid-eighties Charter Arms Undercover 38 in stainless steel, in near-mint condition, with the box (which wasn't) I ended up buying it.

    As I waited on NICS, a much-older gentleman came in and began asking for several different items, the last among them being a "gun I can carry "on my ankle" and a holster for it. He then sat down next to me at the counter while one of the reps fetched him some choices. He had mentioned he was thinking of a "little 38", but the rep had mentioned the small .380s. I showed him the gun I was buying and told him that I carried the same revolver on my ankle as a cop for years and never had an issue.

    Now, this man was pretty stove up, and walked with a cane, and that appeared to be why he chose to sit and let the store rep bring him things to look at. I mentioned to him that drawing from an ankle rig could be compounded by impaired mobility. His response was that he'd fallen "so many times in combat in Vietnam that it didn't even hurt anymore." I pointed out that it is indeed true that a backwards fall can certainly take your vital parts out of a H2H or CQB kill zone, but also that I often pocket-carried the same revolver when I was off-duty. I handed it to the guy making up the sale to demonstrate, as he was wearing khakis and I was wearing jeans.

    I just wanted this cool old codger to have another option for carry. The rep ended up coming back with two .380 autos, a S&W with a CT laser, and a Ruger LCP without. He ended up choosing the Ruger, and I reminded him that it gave him a better option for pocket carry if he ever didn't feel like putting it on down on the ankle. My guess is he'll default to pocket-carry pretty quickly (the gun even came with a pocket-holster.)
     
  25. Arkansas Paul

    Arkansas Paul Member

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    I carry a Taurus 709 Slim in an ankle rig and it is very comfortable. I forget its there.
     
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