Another CZ

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by Badlander, Jul 1, 2016.

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  1. Badlander

    Badlander Member

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    Picked this up today. CZ75 B 9mm. Does anyone know if this is A factory finish. It is very well done if aftermarket. Gun looks to be unfired
    CZ%20Camo.jpg
     
  2. bikemutt

    bikemutt Member

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    I have not seen one around here in anything but black and stainless. Looks nice though.
     
  3. Walt Sherrill

    Walt Sherrill Member

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    I've seen (and owned) high-gloss blued, polycoated, and satin nickeled finish CZs. I've seen several types of stainless. But nothing like THAT. I'm pretty sure it is NOT a factory finish. Looks pretty good, however.

    I don't remember exactly what they look like, but those may be grips from the original Turkish "Overrun" imports -- from the late 90s. (The gun's production year is in the little oval near the ejection port.)
     
  4. Badlander

    Badlander Member

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    Year is 96
     
  5. Walt Sherrill

    Walt Sherrill Member

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    As I understand it, which may be wrong, CZ had a contract with the Turkish military, and built a bunch of guns for them. They apparently also made some extras, which were considered "overrun" output. My first CZ was one of those guns, and I got it around '96. (The Turkish military bought a bunch, and then a Turkish arms firm bought the rights to build the Tanfoglio version themselves -- and they never looked back. That decision apparently led to what is now a very successful firearms industry and a lot of CZ-pattern knockoffs. I think Israel did the same thing, earlier, as well as buying a bunch of CZs. All sorts of CZ-pattern guns in the Middle East...

    I think the gun shown may be one of those Turkish contract overruns. (That doesn't mean it's used, although that is likely. I got mine for under $300, back then. (I got it at a gun show, and it was mis-priced. The dealer, as he was doing the paperwork, realized that he had sold it to me for his cost -- but went through with the deal, anyway.) It had grips like the ones in your photo. They aren't my favorite CZ grips. The fact that the gun has apparently been refinished also suggests it may have been one of the "early" polycoated models.

    Good solid guns, and they seemed to have slightly better triggers than newer ones. (Newer Tanfoglio and Witness guns have much better triggers out of the box, but after several hundred rounds or dry-fires, they end up about the same.

    Warning: if that is an early B model (and a '96 date suggests that it is) dry-fire at your risk. Use a snap cap. I had several but never had a problem, but dry-firing the early B models can cause the firing pin stop retention roll pin to break. It's an easy replacement (from a roll-pin available at most hardware storeS, but it's aggravating when it happens. You have to cut the replacement pin to length. I dry-fired mine (multiple guns) thousands of times without problems, but broke the roll pin in a later CZ-40B with only a little dry-firings, and it's basically the same gun, internally. CZ has since doubled up that roll pin, and you might be able to get a replacement pin from CZ-USA for free.

    The finish on yours looks pretty darned good -- and may be an improvement over the polycoat used back then. (Polycoat has gotten more and more robust over the years, but the polycoat finish on late pre-Bs and early B models was easily damaged by some chemical cleaners (like GunScrubber). Newer versions of polycoat seem to be very good finishes.

    .
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2016
  6. Pilot

    Pilot Member

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    I have a 1996 Turkish contract over run gun that I bought around 1999 when they were offering them at a discount. It has the standard, modern CZ polycoat finish.
     
  7. Badlander

    Badlander Member

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    This is my second CZ 75 B in three weeks. The trigger on this one is much better than the new one I bought. I had glanced at this one before I bought the new one. I was turned off by the camo not wanting A well used gun because this was to be my new carry gun. I stopped back in yesterday and asked to look at it. Was suprised to find it in as new condition, for $200. less than the new one. Live and learn. Who ever did this finish is very good. No real signs that is was redone. Like the red dot showing safety off is perfect as are the sight dots. Thanks for the replys.
     
  8. Dan-O

    Dan-O Member

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    I like it. CZ's are quickly becoming my new favorite handguns.
     
  9. Litlman

    Litlman Member

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    CZ did some 75"s and PO1's in a green poly coat. It did not look as good as the finish on your gun. My 85 Combat is two tone with a mat black slide. I don't remember seeing any other two tone finishes standard from CZ. Yours looks nice, Enjoy!
     
  10. Walt Sherrill

    Walt Sherrill Member

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    I think you'll find, if you try some different things (like carb cleaner or GunScrubber) on the frame (under the grips, where it won't show), that while the early Turkish overrun guns have a robust polycoat, but it's not as damage-resistant as the stuff they're using now.

    In the early 2000s, when I was a moderator on the original CZ Forum, there were a lot of complaints about some chemicals damaging the finish -- especially in the late '90s and early '00s. That complaint seems to have mostly gone away with later versions of the finish.
     
  11. kBob

    kBob Member

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    One of the main things that caused me to pick up my CZ-75 in Europe in '82 was the deep high polish "go for a swim in it" blue finish.

    Seeing the paint jobs when they first came in the US was painful.

    Other factors were the FN HP-ish grip and high cap magazine, The best up until then DA on a Semi Auto pistol I ever had experience with, ability to carry and shoot it from "cocked and locked" exactly like my service 1911A1, and the statements by Cooper to the effect that if one had to have a 9x19mm that this was the one.

    It was a bit large for anything but carrying as a service pistol ( found I could shove it into the GI flap holster or chest holster) and the same week I added an HK P7 PSP for concealed carry. Really wish I still had that one and glad I still have the CZ.

    -kBob
     
  12. Walt Sherrill

    Walt Sherrill Member

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    You can still get a CZ with high gloss blued finish, on order, from the CZ Custom Shop. They run a bit more, like the satin nickel finish -- but they're still very nicely done -- as the ones descrdibed by kBob were. (I've had a couple, including a 85 Combat in hi-gloss blue.)

    My favorite finish is satin nickel, but CZ doesn't offer than on many of their models. (I have an 85 Combat in that finish, and had a Compact, too. I've also seen a nickel CZ-97B; I think one distributor had a limited run of that model in that finish.

    (CZ sold a lot of guns through US Army Post Exchanges in West Germany, some of them semi-custom. Very nice. I think the Frankonia was the main firm doing the work. Very nice. Sounds like you may have one of their guns.)

    .
     
  13. Tallball

    Tallball Member

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    Nice pistol! :)
     
  14. lsudave

    lsudave Member

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    It definitely looks refinished, and your description of the trigger makes it sound so. These guns, in my opinion, are like good Levis, they just get better and more comfortable the more worn in they get. The beaters are great as long as the barrel isn't damaged, and if you slap a new finish on them, they're as good/better than new.

    Ooohh, a blued early 80's version? Please, pretty please, give us a picture?
     
  15. I6turbo

    I6turbo Member

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    Nice! You can never have too many CZ handguns. ;)

    If it's factory stock I suggest you buy this kit for it and dramatically improve the DA and SA pulls, and make it safe to dry fire without messing up the roll pin or the firing pin.

    https://cajungunworks.com/product/54420-ultra-lite/

    Use the Black spring if this is a range/plinking gun, use the Blue one if it's a SD gun.

    I have these kits in my CZs and the trigger pulls on the 75 B, 75 D PCR, and 97 B with the blue springs are dramatically improved -- excellent, actually. I have the Black spring in the 85 Combat and it's even better, amazingly light and sweet.

    I've conducted testing with all of them to examine the primer strikes and even with the Black spring the strikes are good on all ammo/primers that I've tested which include Blazer Brass, Speer Lawman and Gold Dot, S&B, GECO, Perfecta, and perhaps a couple I'm forgetting.

    Highly recommended. :)
     
  16. Badlander

    Badlander Member

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    16Turbo. I just tuned up my other CZ 75 B with that kit and the race hammer and adjustable sear. Along with some polishing the double action is very smooth and the single action pull is excellent. A very worthwhile project.

    I did use the blue spring
     
  17. kBob

    kBob Member

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    lsudave,

    Well I am a bit embarrassed by the gun these days around collectors because dispite all my high praising of it the slide stop broke. At the time there was no CZ-USA and no way to get a replacement. A buddy flying out of Frankfurt Main during the first Gulf War stopped by a German gun shop and picked up the only replacement they had. Instead of the petite gloss blue cutie it had it now sports an ugly big old mag release like a CZ75B.

    Those that have looked at the part thought it was a heat treating problem that caused crystallization. The break was right were the flat bit becomes the nub one thumbs down. I was firing 147 grain subsonics at the time. I had used the gun very successfully with some 131 grain subsonics I had gotten that were for the MP5SD while I was in Germany from some German Police and used them there a bit and thought "Why not?" Not sure the heavy bullets had anything to do with the breakage but have stuck with 124 and 115 every since.

    The ugliest CZ75 (no B) I ever saw belonged to a different friend that got his from a USAF load master that claimed to have picked it up in Lebanon when we still supported those folks. It had other issues and very much made me think of what the Soviets used to call "Monkey Models" of their equipment that was intended for use by non-Soviet customers. Basically it lacked the finish one expected of a CZ75 at the time and apparently had some issue with the safety not staying on as it seemed to have no resistance to movement in any direction.

    One thing some folks griped about on the (no B) models was the spring that provided friction to hold the magazine in AFTER you hit the magazine release. The Mag only barely started to eject and then stopped. The Czechs seemed to think this was a good thing to prevent the loss of the magazine in combat conditions. The magazines were not even meant to drop free. I found that a good downward snap of the wrist could fling the magazines free though.........sort of like with the early Glocks and their bulgy plastic mag bodies.

    Unfortunately when I headed stateside I stripped the original box my CZ came in down to just the cover and so do not have an intact original box.

    My Pistol was not from the American Rod & Gun Club , but a shop in Hanau.

    I did buy a P1 (P38) Walther rework from the ARGC at Graffenwohr and a FWB 124 there. I shot some rats with the air rifle while there. Getting long so to keep story short, Colonel made me promise to not take a Personally Owned Weapon in the form of a firearm to Graff for a three week stay. My position was one where I was normally armed and he had allowed me to use a personal weapon up to that point. I obeyed his desire to not TAKE a POW to Graff. I did not how ever promise not to obtain the same once we arrived. I should have been a lawyer, eh?

    -kBob
     
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