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Another M1 load question

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Ironbar, Jan 23, 2013.

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  1. Ironbar

    Ironbar Member

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    Has anyone ever used 140gr bullets for their M1? Seems at matches and such, everyone is using either surplus ammo, or 168gr Nosler or Matchking bullets in reloads.

    Any advice would be much appreciated! Thanks!
     
  2. rodregier

    rodregier Member

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    Any particular reason why you want to use 140g projectiles in the Garand?

    If you are looking for low-cost I like the .30 cal 165g SP bulk projectiles by Remington. Accurate, suitable for hunting and in the 147 to 168g "Sweet spot" bracket for projectile weights for the Garand gas system.
     
  3. Ironbar

    Ironbar Member

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    Because of Nosler Custom Competition 140gr bullets on sale for dirt cheap!
     
  4. cfullgraf

    cfullgraf Member

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    For 100 yard and 200 yard matches, there are several fellows over on the CMP forum that use 110 grain and 125 grain bullets in their M1s.

    For longer ranges, the wind comes into play more with the lighter bullets.
     
  5. rodregier

    rodregier Member

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    Unless the noses of the 140's are really weird, you should be able to work up a load that will function the Garand just fine. Use "faster" powder 147g load data as a starting point. (IMR4895 and it's brothers). Even so, start low and work up.

    Using the data specifically published for the Garand would be a better bet, since proper loading for it is more constrained than modern bolt guns.

    Two critical items to avoid slamfires (see threads elsewhere here) are primer seating and case resizing to proper dimensions. Using a cartridge headspace gage to check the resized cases (and even the loaded cartridges) is cheap insurance against such unpleasantness.
     
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