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another thing to watch out for while hunting, snakes.

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by eastbank, May 28, 2020.

  1. eastbank

    eastbank Member

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    ran into this small rattlesnake on a path to my turkey hunting area. i left it as i found it, alive and well as its on a less beaten path.
     

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  2. H&Hhunter

    H&Hhunter Moderator Staff Member

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    Is that an Eastern Diamond Back? A beautiful, healthy looking snake.
     
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  3. mokin

    mokin Member

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    That would be a pretty good sized rattler for my part of the world. I've run into some really big ones in North Dakota.

    I leave'm be. I figure any snake that has the courtesy to warn me that it's around deserves that respect.
     
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  4. eastbank

    eastbank Member

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    H&H, yes. i don,t kill snakes unless they are where the children play and i can,t remove the snake to a different area. i have a friend who has a mounted ED rattler that was 59 inches taken up north in potter county pa.
     

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  5. Hanshi

    Hanshi Member

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    I was born and bred in Georgia, and snakes are a fact of life. Size for size the most toxic of the bunch is the S.E. canebrake rattler. One autumn near where we lived a man was bitten when he climbed down out of his deer stand. He was dead in a documented 15 minutes. They were all over our yard and even came up on the porch. Never had a problem with them as they are shy and not as prone to strike as, say, copperheads and cottonmouths. The eastern diamondbacks pack a punch, being the largest venomous snake in North America. A canebrake is very big at 75 (+or -) inches. But the E. diamondback would only be "modest" at that size. The main thing about the diamondbacks is their huge, out sized heads which pack a much larger quantity of venom than any of the others.
     
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  6. rayatphonix

    rayatphonix Member

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    I do most of my hunting in the low country of SC. Beautiful area, but full of snakes. We rarely leave the road without snake boots. Snakes are just part of the experience and I’ve come to enjoy them.
     
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  7. FL-NC

    FL-NC Member

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    A friend of mine killed a diamondback last week in his barn just under 6 foot.
     
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  8. Patocazador

    Patocazador Member

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    Diamondbacks are getting scarce around here. I haven't seen one in the last 6 years. I tend to leave them alone if they're in the woods but all poisonous snakes near the yard get executed. I also kill any cottonmouth or pygmy (ground) rattler I come across anywhere since they seem to want to harm folks .. ill-tempered serpents are they.
     
  9. skeeterfogger

    skeeterfogger Member

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    Had a surprising afternoon. Wife and I were watching a movie and I thought one of the dogs were sniffing around where they didn't need to be but all of them were napping on the couch. Look over an wow, about a 4 foot snake in the house. Non poisonous thankfully. Only one of 4 I've seen in 35 years here. Freed it out back.
     
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  10. Dunross

    Dunross Member

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    I have lived in Florida all of my life. Diamondback and pygmy rattlers, and cottonmouths. When I was a boy we killed every rattler and moccasin we came across. I don't kill non-vemomous snakes.

    Nowadays rattlers have become scarce and I don't kill them if they aren't right up close to my house, barn, etc. They're an important part of the ecology and should be conserved where possible so long as they're not an active threat to my family.

    Cottonmouths still seem to be plentiful.
     
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  11. jmorris

    jmorris Member

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    I can’t remember where I copied this one from and it was just a couple months ago.

    7CE963D3-3B2B-4E26-BF17-54F6F8B2951D.jpeg

    Hats off to you guys, venomous snakes and spiders generally don’t last a long time around me.
     
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  12. earlthegoat2

    earlthegoat2 Member

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    In GA it is the three Cs and the three Rs

    Cottonmouth
    Copperhead
    Coral Snake

    Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake
    Canebrake/Timber Rattlesnake
    Pygmy Rattlesnake

    I wear snake boots whenever I am off the beaten path.
     
  13. HB

    HB Member

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    Anybody eat them?
     
  14. luzyfuerza

    luzyfuerza Member

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    I have. Just about stepped on a big timber rattler one cold morning while I was muzzleloader hunting for deer.

    Turned him into a hatband and lunch. Tasted like chicken, but with bones like a fish.
     
  15. earlthegoat2

    earlthegoat2 Member

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    I’m somewhat unsure what venomous snakes do for the ecosystem what king snakes could not also.

    It is true though that the numbers of the Eastern DB are dwindling. I have heard this is more due to human extermination than anything else like habitat destruction or whatnot. We don’t have a rattlesnake roundup anymore. At least not officially. Maybe that will help them survive for a bit longer.

    One thing I know is that in GA, the killing of non-venomous snakes is illegal. If one were to twist the interpretation of that a little bit then it could be read as the killing of venomous snakes is encouraged. Don’t know but that is the impression I get whenever I ponder the first time I read that statute.
     
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  16. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

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    I live in the NW corner of GA and hunt mostly in the mountains of North GA. I see the occasional copperhead during warm weather months. I've only seen 1 rattler and that was on a summer backpack trip in the mountains many years ago. He was a big one, at least a 5 footer, maybe 6'.

    Never seen a venomous snake while hunting and only 1-2 period. Turkey season here is early enough that it is still cool enough that they don't get out. That might be more of a problem farther south. This year it was March 24- May 15. By the time big game season gets started in October they are usually not out either.
     
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  17. eastbank

    eastbank Member

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    the story about a women who found a hurt snake and nursed it back to health and it turned around and bit her and she said in surprize, oh why did you bite me and the snake said i,m a snake and thats what we do..
     
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  18. Ernie Bass

    Ernie Bass Member

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    Have run across so many snakes in my years, especially cotton Mouths, copper heads and Rattle Snakes. Never killed a one. Just have let them be in in the woods or swamps. No problem.
     
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  19. Rembrandt

    Rembrandt Member

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    Don't really care for snakes, startles me when ever I see one. Have run into rattlers while hunting Wyoming for Mulies, Antelope, and prairie dogs. Found one coiled up by a rifle once. They blend in so well to the natural landscape, makes it hard to seem them.


    snakes 2.JPG

    snakes 3.JPG
     
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  20. BearBrimstone

    BearBrimstone Member

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    Copperheads, pygmies, and eastern diamondbacks are all we ever see around here. I believe the pygmies are considered a protected species here in Tennessee now. One thing that might ease some folks fear of copperheads a bit is they have very weak venom. For a full grown adult, you are more likely to die from an allergic reaction to the venom than the actual power of the venom.
     
  21. Ernie Bass

    Ernie Bass Member

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    Almost all of the snake bites where have been from People handling them. ( and not many of those, especially considering the high number of Poisonous snakes) The Caneback Rattler is a protective species.
     
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  22. RetiredUSNChief

    RetiredUSNChief Member

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    I like to think I've grown smarter over the decades but I'm sure the kid who used to say "Cool, let's catch it!" is still alive and well deep inside.

    It's amazing how many people go off the deep end whenever they come across a snake of any kind, venomous or not.

    Unless the encountered snake in question presents a real threat to people they should be left alone. Especially in the wild.
     
  23. Patocazador

    Patocazador Member

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    I have never seen a copperhead in the wild. I'm pretty sure they don't live in Florida.
     
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  24. ScrapMetalSlug

    ScrapMetalSlug Member

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    Maybe you see less rattlers in Florida because the pythons are eating them all? When I lived in Missouri, nearly every fishing and canoe trip involved seeing cottonmouths coiled on the bank or swimming. Luckily, they never bothered me so I left them alone.
     
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  25. skeeterfogger

    skeeterfogger Member

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    I'm pretty much for live and let live but I have seen situations where it's out of control. One experience was at a state park lake. Signs all over. Don't kill wildlife. Nice dock and fishing area. Only problem. When evening came there were Mocs all over the place. You couldn't keep fish on a stringer. Even in basket there were so many small snakes that could get through the mesh. It was nerve racking. Had to be on guard all the time while fishing, going to and from car and bathroom. Was definatly no place for kids. That was like 10 years ago. Have never gone back.
    At home I don't mind non venomous but others are removed.
     
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