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Antique Rifle... What Is It?

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by spin180, Aug 12, 2004.

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  1. spin180

    spin180 Member

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    A coworker showed me this rifle, that a relative gave him. We know it's old and Italian; probably about 6mm or so, but that's all. Can anyone identify it and give me some information on it?

    Thanks!

    [​IMG]
     
  2. spin180

    spin180 Member

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    The action...

    [​IMG]
     
  3. spin180

    spin180 Member

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    Markings...

    [​IMG]
     
  4. spin180

    spin180 Member

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    Markings & rear sight...

    [​IMG]
     
  5. spin180

    spin180 Member

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    Markings...

    [​IMG]
     
  6. spin180

    spin180 Member

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    Magazine & trigger guard...

    [​IMG]
     
  7. spin180

    spin180 Member

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    Muzzle w/ side mount bayonet lug...

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Ash

    Ash Member

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    You have an Italian Vetterli service rifle. These were first issued without a magazine (single-shots) and fired a black-powder cartridge. They were issued these bolt-action rifles when we were still using the Trapdoor. Some time later, the Italians attached a Vitale magazine to these rifles, converting them into repeaters.

    Yours has gone one step further and was rechambered in WWI to the 6.5 Carcano round (and in the process received a newer, Mannlicher magazine) for use by rear-echelon and colonial troops. The rifle is probably strong enough for the 6.5, but barely so. I would hand-load for it and load it down some to keep things safe.

    Ash
     
  9. wasrjoe

    wasrjoe Member

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  10. spin180

    spin180 Member

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    Super, thanks for the quick response guys!

    :cool: :D
     
  11. Sylvilagus Aquaticus

    Sylvilagus Aquaticus Member

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    Ash left out one important piece of information.

    Even downloading the 6.5 Carcano cartrige for this rifle is still questionable. They (this model of rifle, revised) were issued to units/troops who were very unlikely to ever fire them.

    It makes a splendid wall-hanger, IYGMD.

    Regards,
    Rabbit.
     
  12. MrMurphy

    MrMurphy Member

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    I saw a long distance photo of this on Glocktalk with no markings etc. He's right.... and teh hole in the bottom of the magazine is a bonafide no mistaking it mark of a Mannlicher-clip-system rifle. After the last shot the clip falls out the bottom.
     
  13. BigG

    BigG Member

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    That's a "No shoot! I Droppa da Gun!" Italian rifle :p
     
  14. Jim K

    Jim K Member

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    Big G wrote, "That's a 'No shoot! I Droppa da Gun!' Italian rifle".

    Actually the main reason for converting those old rifles was due to the huge losses of men and equipment in heavy fighting in some of the worst country in Europe, the eastern Alps. While stymied in part by poor leadership (seemingly almost a given on the Allied side in WWI), the Italian troops fought with very great courage and determination, and kept a large part of the Austro-Hungarian army tied down and off the Western Front.

    That fighting is one of the least known parts of WWI history. Whole shelves of books have been written about the Western Front and the Russian campaigns, but very little about the Alpine fighting and the Italian front. The only book about that area I can recall offhand is "A Farewell to Arms", which is hardly a detailed history.

    Jim
     
  15. Das Pferd

    Das Pferd Member

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    One of those shotgun news had a big article about thes rifle, it was pretty recent. i just remember them talking about not firing these rifles because they were rechambered for a round they couldnt handle.
     
  16. spin180

    spin180 Member

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    I'm going to try to find that article. If any knows which issue it was or can tell me where to find it, I'd greatly appreciate it.

    Thanks!

    :)
     
  17. Johnny Guest

    Johnny Guest Moderator Emeritus

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    Italian Army in action, WW-I

    Jim Keenan wrote:
    True, Jim - - You mention A Farewell to Arms as one example, saying it is "hardly a detailed history," which is also quite true.

    Another worthwhile work of fiction, with a good deal more detail of the soldiers' lives, and some interesting combat scenes: A Soldier of the Great War, by Mark Helprin. That author's style is nearly 180 degrees from Hemingway's, and makes an interesting contrast.

    Apparently Helprin either has some firearms knowledge of his own, or did some astute research - - The young narrator, an Italian soldier, takes care to obtain a Mauser for his long range shooting chores, observes the type rifles in use by the Austrian opponents, and makes good use of a sidearm on occasion.

    Best,
    Johnny
     
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