Any advantages to a titanum blade?

Discussion in 'Non-Firearm Weapons' started by Jeff White, Aug 30, 2021.

  1. Jeff White

    Jeff White Moderator Staff Member

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    I just received an ad from Civilware, they have several titanium blades. I would think they would be very hard to sharpen.

    Just wondering if there is any advantage or if it's just a gimmick.
     
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  2. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    Ti alloys don't hold an edge without complex alloying and very complex heat treat.

    Mad Science forge (and Sam's brother) make the only blades in Ti alloys that perform close to steel.

    Mission has made Beta 6Al4V Ti blades for decades and they don't cut like steel, but they were for a very specific environment.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2021
  3. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    I didn't see anything there but D2 and AEB-L blades. Some Ti bodies, but no blades.

    Which of their knives used Ti for the blade?
     
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  4. Jeff White

    Jeff White Moderator Staff Member

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    Never mind, their shop on Guidefitter just said titanium. I looked on Covilware’s site and it says titanium handles…big difference.
     
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  5. Madcap_Magician

    Madcap_Magician Member

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    Titanium except by Sam at Mad Science Forge is not really suitable for using knives. It's actually very easy to sharpen because it's not very hard and even with optimized heat treat for cutlery, it's not very hardenable. Even Sam only gets his knives and swords to the mid- to high-50s on the Rockwell C scale, if I recall correctly.

    However, another method of getting a useable titanium knife is to make a chisel-ground knife with the flat bevel edge carbided. That provides an extremely toothy edge that is excellent for cutting fibrous material like rope or meat. You can then sharpen it by sharpening the titanium side to expose fresh carbides on the flat bevel.

    Those knives are still not really for heavy use, though.
     
  6. joneb

    joneb Member

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    I would consider a titanium knife for saltwater diving, the stainless steel dive knives don't hold a edge well. The right titanium alloy may do just as well or better.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2021
  7. herrwalther

    herrwalther Member

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    I have seen several knives as advertised "Titanium coated blades." Haven't seen any with all Ti blades though so it doesn't sound like a good steel for knives.
     
  8. SharpDog

    SharpDog Member

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  9. sgt127

    sgt127 Member

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    I have two titanium knives. Both Newt Livesay Woo variations.

    I carried them around my neck in uniform. A rather hot and damp climate for several months of the year in Texas.

    They would “cut”. But, they were extremely lightweight little stickers that were easy to carry.

    The one with sharper grind lines is actually fairly sharp.

    E6B86014-4F5F-4ED7-B4C8-F5E3FF6C9E00.jpeg
     
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  10. JShirley

    JShirley Administrator Staff Member

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    If someone wanted a non-metallic sharp, G10 with a rough edge would be as or more usable, at 1/4 or less the cost.

    If you're looking for corrosion resistance, 440A or AEB-L would be better choices for real usable knives, and fairly inexpensive, for knife steels.
     
  11. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    There was once a bit of a fad for cobalt knife blades, I find at least one source.
    What of them?
     
  12. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    Excellent...expensive, but excellent. David Boye's dendritic cobalt, Kit Carson's stellite, Rob Simonich's tallonite, and now Terrain 365 is making dendritic cobalt knives. Kit and Rob are sadly gone. There are a few custom makers like Tom Mayo working with it beyond David and Terrain, but it isn't a fun material to grind.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2021
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  13. Lo-Profile

    Lo-Profile Member

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    I use a titanium one at work. It's okay, doesn't hold a edge well. I'm cutting thru cardboard, plastic and using it to pry up HD staples. I have to resharpen it and once a week. I only use a cheap ceramic sharpener, took about a month for the edge to wear in with the sharpener but now it works just fine.
     
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