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Any health risks involved with chrome-tanned holsters?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Holsters and Accessories' started by SA Town, Sep 5, 2011.

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  1. SA Town

    SA Town Member

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    Let us say that an individual was to purchase a holster whose skin had been chrome-tanned.

    Although complaints have been made surrounding the rusting properties of the chemicals involved (and how they remove finishes on firearms), what can be said about human contact with such a holster?

    If it matters, the material in question is sharkskin, not regular cattle-hide or leather.

    Thank you in advance for replies given.
     
  2. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    Not that I've ever heard of.

    If it was going to harm you, it would be illegal in the USA, or at least in **********.

    And it isn't.

    rc
     
  3. Lucas_Y

    Lucas_Y Member

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    Are you planning on gnawing or licking your holster for extended periods of time on a frequent basis?
     
  4. Klusterbuck

    Klusterbuck Member

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    Kind of a personal question ain't it????? MMMMMMM leather...
     
  5. Exeter

    Exeter Member

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    Chrome is only a problem if it's in a certain oxidation state. When it's in the +6 state, it's a potent carcinogen. The chrome used in chrome tanning is chromium sulfate, which is in the harmless +3 state.
     
  6. sixgunner455

    sixgunner455 Member

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    is that like eating paint chips?
     
  7. Exeter

    Exeter Member

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    No. The paint chip problem comes from the practice many years ago of using lead as a filler/extender in house paints. Lead was phased out decades ago, but the problem persists in some older homes. Lead causes central nervous system damage and can severely damage the brains of young children. There is some evidence that it has carcinogenic potential, but that pales beside its toxicity to the CNS.

    Chromium is kind of a odd duck in the body. Chrome(3) is actually an essential trace element, needed for proper metabolism. If you've ever seen the movie 'Erin Brockovich' you can see what happens when you're careless with Chrome(6).
     
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