Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Anyone own a Le Francais 25?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by G.A.Pster, Mar 29, 2009.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. G.A.Pster

    G.A.Pster Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2006
    Messages:
    229
    I’ve recently been intrigued by super tiny pistols.
    And I ran across the Le francais .25, It’s the smallest double action 25 I’ve seen at 4 /716 inch in length.

    http://www.gunsworld.com/french/fran_poc_us.html

    I was wondering if any of you own one and if so what you think of it?
     
  2. G.A.Pster

    G.A.Pster Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2006
    Messages:
    229
    No one?
     
  3. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    23,908
    Location:
    Arizona
    I don’t own one, at least for the moment. But besides the small size it also has the most simple double-action system I know of. It consists of the trigger and trigger bar assembly, the striker/firing pin and two springs.

    Some year’s back I was having a discussion about 9mm services pistols with Bill Ruger, who was in the process of designing one. I suggested that he look at the Le Francais, not as a final design, but as a departure point. He was aware of it, but not impressed. However another potential gun manufacturer apparently was.

    His name was Gaston Glock.
     
  4. twofifty

    twofifty Member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2007
    Messages:
    1,611
    Very interesting story.

    I looked at the link you provide, and see that this French pistol was a blowback DAO without safety. The trigger was non pivoting, moving straight back like a 1911. The 'tilt the barrel up & forward to load the first round' peculiarity is odd. Made almost exclusively of cheap stampings. One model produced till 1969....and wasn't it 20 or so years later that the Glock was released?

    The shape of its grip at the top -where the beavertail would be on a 1911- looks just like a Glock grip.
     
  5. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    23,908
    Location:
    Arizona
    I think the only thing Gaston might have been interested in was the simplicity of the system. In a military sidearm, and from the perspective of manufacturing costs, simplicity is a virtue. Of course this was nothing but a concept that offered a starting point. Obviously the Glock design is much more involved. Keep in mind that the Le Francais dates from 1915.
     
  6. HammerBite

    HammerBite Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2006
    Messages:
    484
    Location:
    Northern VA
    I think it is interesting to compare the "Modele de Poche" with my Beretta Model 20 and other similar tip-ups. The only significant difference I see is the hammer-fired TDA lockwork of the Beretta. The barrel, slide and recoil-spring arrangements are about the same. It's kind of neat how the 1913 Le Francais design lives on even today.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2009
  7. HammerBite

    HammerBite Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2006
    Messages:
    484
    Location:
    Northern VA
    It is also interesting to compare the striker spring arrangement of the Le Francais design with that of the H&K VP70, which is another DAO striker-fired design. Both designs utilize two springs, one pushing forward and one pushing backward. Apparently the function of the backward pushing spring is to keep the striker nose away from the breech face when chambering a round, thereby preventing chambering difficulties and slam fires. This spring is overridden by the main forward pushing spring when the gun is fired.

    Glock's contribution to the design was to eliminate the backward pushing spring by partially cocking the striker upon slide closure, thereby serving the same function, as well as providing for a shorter trigger pull when firing the gun.

    La Francais:

    [​IMG]

    VP70:

    [​IMG]
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Mar 30, 2009
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page