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AR trigger work

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by Gasitman, Feb 2, 2011.

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  1. Gasitman

    Gasitman Member

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    JUST FYI, I am reposting this, not my own stuff, found this on another forum.


    Here is where I got the idea http://www.sargenthome.com/15_Minute_AR_Trigger_Job.htm

    So a buddy and I decided last night to do some trigger work on our ARs after I found this article. Figured some of you guys might find it interesting. We actually did 4 guns last night, the only thing we didn't do that this guy does is the actual polishing method on the trigger. We pulled them apart and used a dremel with a polishing wheel and some very light polishing compound to clean and polish the hammer sear. We did not take any metal off the trigger or sear just polished them. Here is the run down on the gun's we worked on.


    S&W M&P.5.56cal. Trigger measured at approx. 7lbs before work with horrible feeling creep. I say approx. because this one was all over the board but averaged in this area. After the work creep is very smooth but still there, with a consistent 4.75 lb pull.

    DPMS LR308 Trigger measured 8lbs consistent with horrible creep. Now on this gun I wasn't very comfortable with cutting the hammer spring it is much stiffer than the others we worked on. I might change my mind though. After polishing and trigger spring work it measured at consistent 5.75lbs, creep is much smoother as well.

    Olympic Arms 5.56cal. Trigger measured at a consistent 6 lbs with creep. After work trigger measured consistent 3.75 lbs with smooth creep. One thing I want to say about this gun, in my opinion this gun has the best feeling trigger out of the bunch even before the work it was smoother and lighter than the rest.

    DPMS 204cal. Trigger measured consistent 7lbs with bad creep. After work trigger measured consistent 4.90 lbs with smoothed creep. This gun had noticeably stiffer springs than the others. I don't think it has anything to do with caliber but more to do with brand.

    I also ordered some Jard 3.5 lb trigger springs $10.00, when I get them I will report how they work out. I also had to order a few other items that I need to install before I actually get to go shoot the guns. I will keep you guys posted on how they work out.

    Anyone else been messing with there black guns lately?
     
  2. madcratebuilder

    madcratebuilder Member

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    Bending or cutting the FCG springs does give you a lighter trigger pull and polishing well smooth it up. Controlling trigger creep on a single stage or the break point on the two stage trigger takes more work on the disconnector and secondary sear. There are a few quality dvd's you can rent from smartflix.com that cover these methods.
     
  3. Kwanger

    Kwanger Member

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    I tried that trigger job once - while the pull was indeed lightened, it made it feel "mushy" to me, so I got rid of the cut and bent springs and installed Tubbs CS ones, which definitely seem to crisp up the trigger a bit and should last a lifetime.
     
  4. wnycollector

    wnycollector Member

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    When I get a chance, I plan on pulling the trigger, hammer, disconnecter from my only non-RRA 2 stage lower and send it to Bill Springfield and have him clean it up to a very short, smooth, clean 4 lb break. Here is the link to his website http://triggerwork.net/ar15s.html
     
  5. TonyAngel

    TonyAngel Member

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    I hate to break it to you, but polishing does take metal off. Although I do wish you the best of luck with your home trigger jobs, there really is no way of telling how deep the hardening was on your original parts. You very well my have inadvertently polished right through the hardening. Just watch out and keep your head on straight if/when it goes full auto and just remember to let go of the trigger if it does. If you polished through the hardening, you'll probably encounter problems 500 to 1000 rounds down the road.

    This is the problem with the Springfield triggers. Neither you nor he have any way of telling how deep the hardening goes with any trigger parts. Of the three Springfield triggers that I've had, I have one left and that has been relegated to duty in my Smith AR22. The other two have found their way into the garbage. They both went full auto at around the 1000 round mark.

    I'm not saying that you WILL have problems with your home trigger job or the Springfield triggers, I'm just saying to watch for a failure.

    The best way to get a good trigger is to buy a trigger that was cut before the hardening process. You can do the springs, but don't go too light. You'll likely have trouble with ammo that has hard primers.
     
  6. wnycollector

    wnycollector Member

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    TonyAngel, thanks for the heads up about your experience with Springfield triggers! It looks like I will save up my $$$ and pick up another RRA 2 stage.
     
  7. onebigelf

    onebigelf Member

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