Are cast LFP and cast LFN bullets interchangeable?

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by coondogger, May 2, 2021.

  1. coondogger

    coondogger Member

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    I have a recipe that calls for cast LFP bullets but I see only cast LFN for sale. Can the LFN be substituted for the LFP?
     
  2. bersaguy

    bersaguy Member

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    If the weight and profile are similar, I don't think there should be any difference. Lead Flat Point and Lead Flat Nose are the same thing as far as I know.
     
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  3. bluetopper

    bluetopper Member

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    They are both lead and weigh the same, yes. In reloading it’s chamber pressure you worry about not the front end of a bullet.
     
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  4. coondogger

    coondogger Member

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    thanks.
     
  5. AJC1

    AJC1 Member

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    In a rifle its speed a lot of the time. I hit the 2200fps barrier waaaaay before pressure become even a consideration.
     
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  6. BW460

    BW460 Member

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    Depends on how hot you are loading them. If one is longer than the other and you seat them to the same OAL, then the longer bullet will be seated deeper and will have increased pressure.
     
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  7. memtb

    memtb Member

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    Assuming they have very similar beating surfaces....the pressures should be very similar! memtb
     
  8. FROGO207

    FROGO207 Member

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    Also the location of a crimp groove if you are crimping as that usually determines the case volume as well. I have noticed different brands of revolver bullets have crimp grooves that are in different places so you have to pay attention when changing bullets with an established load.
     
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  9. coondogger

    coondogger Member

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    Another two questions. Can a 405 gr cast with gas check be used in place of a regular cast bullet without gas check. And can a .458 diameter cast bullet be substituted for a .458 dia.?
     
  10. 35 Whelen
    • Contributing Member

    35 Whelen Contributing Member

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    The main thing you need to concern yourself with, all other things the same, is how deep the bullet is seated in the case. This has the most effect on pressure, and velocity, when the bullets are similar in composition, weight, and bearing surface.

    35W
     
  11. memtb

    memtb Member

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    On the gas check question. If bullet weights are same, seating depths the same.....it should present no problem.

    On the .458 cast bullet question. I assume that you mean, a cast substituted for a jacketed bullet. Obviously, you would have to work up a load for the cast. Also, the bore diameter may play into this a bit. Generally.....cast bullets tend to shoot more accurately if they are somewhere between 0.001” to 0.003” larger in diameter than the firearm bore. “Slugging” the firearm bore will give you an indication of about where you would want to be with a cast bullet. I also said “generally”......this is not to say that a cast bullet of same size as the bore will not shoot accurately. However, leading and accuracy may be issues.

    Also, it most situations you should not interchange cast and jacketed bullets, without a thorough bore cleaning. Again as generality......cast bullets do not shoot well through a bore with jacketed bullet fouling remaining! If you have a very smooth, slick bore, this may not be a huge issue. A somewhat rough bore has more copper fouling which has a detrimental effect on cast bullet accuracy!

    Obviously the statements above are my opinions and should be valued as such. memtb
     
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