Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Are metal piercing bullets legal?

Discussion in 'Handguns: General Discussion' started by Miamitiger, Feb 24, 2007.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Miamitiger

    Miamitiger member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2006
    Messages:
    65
    Are metal piercing bullets legal?
    Are tracers legal?
    Please help:)
     
  2. 6_gunner

    6_gunner Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2006
    Messages:
    534
    Location:
    Indiana/Kentucky
    Here in Indiana, I don't think there are any ammo restrictions. I've seen armor-piercing ammo, tracers, even incindiary ammo at gun shows and mil surplus stores.
    Don't know about the rest of the country, though.
     
  3. Shadan7

    Shadan7 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2006
    Messages:
    362
    Location:
    Missouri
    Depends.

    Even a .22 will cut right through light aluminum. So it depends on what you're talking about when you say "metal piercing". Look around, you can probably find a wide range of ammo which will do some fairly impressive things, not all of it intended or advertised. :eek:

    7
     
  4. Miamitiger

    Miamitiger member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2006
    Messages:
    65
    There are special kind of bullets capable of piercing through a bullet proof best and they are called metal piercing bullets.
     
  5. Dan the Man

    Dan the Man Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2004
    Messages:
    83
    Location:
    League City, TX
    Miamitiger-

    First, 'metal piercing bullets' is not a commonly used term. Second, legality depends on where you live. I presume you live in Florida, and here is what the Florida statute says:

    "790.31 Armor-piercing or exploding ammunition or dragon's breath shotgun shells, bolo shells, or flechette shells prohibited.--

    (1) As used in this section, the term:

    (a) "Armor-piercing bullet" means any bullet which has a steel inner core or core of equivalent hardness and a truncated cone and which is designed for use in a handgun as an armor-piercing or metal-piercing bullet...."

    (ref: http://www.leg.state.fl.us/Statutes...e&Search_String=&URL=Ch0790/SEC31.HTM&Title=-)

    Title XLVI Chapter 790

    Note that 'armor piercing' has nothing to do with whether or not it penetrates body armor. Note also that it only refers to ammunition which is designed for use in a handgun. It is also interesting that they included 'armor-piercing' in the definition of 'armor piercing'. The statute is quite poorly written.

    I did not see any references to tracers.

    Regards
    --Dan
     
  6. grendelbane

    grendelbane Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2004
    Messages:
    838
    Location:
    KY
    Poorly written statutes are quite common, both on the federal and state level.

    Federal law bans AP bullets for handguns, based on construction, not on performance. You specifically can not use depleted uranium for the core of a handgun bullet. Which presents a loop-hole for the use of handgun bullets manufactured with a core of U-238, perfectly legal.

    Simply leaving the word "depleted" out would have banned both. Not that I think any civilians were likely to manufacture a bullet with a uranium core.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2007
  7. kludge

    kludge Member

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2006
    Messages:
    2,634
    Location:
    Indiana
    "Body-armor-piercing" handgun bullets are illegal... The law defines that as a handgun bullet that has a plastic coating.

    IC 35-47-5-11
    "Armor-piercing handgun ammunition" defined; related offenses
    35-47-5-11 Sec. 11. (a) As used in this section, "armor-piercing handgun ammunition" means a cartridge that:
    (1) can be fired in a handgun; and
    (2) will, upon firing, expel a projectile that has a metal core and an outer coating of plastic.
    (b) A person who knowingly or intentionally:
    (1) manufactures;
    (2) possesses;
    (3) transfers possession of; or
    (4) offers to transfer possession of;
    armor-piercing handgun ammunition commits a Class C felony.
    (c) This section does not apply to nylon coated ammunition, plastic shot capsules, or ammunition designed to be used in rifles or shotguns.
    (d) This section does not apply to a law enforcement officer who is acting in the course of the officer's official duties or to a person who manufactures or imports for sale or sells armor-piercing handgun ammunition to a law enforcement agency.
     
  8. musher

    musher Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2003
    Messages:
    586
    Location:
    Fairbanks, AK
    OT, but I think the proper attribution is Edward Abbey.
     
  9. jbleinweber

    jbleinweber Member

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2006
    Messages:
    7
    I wear a vest, and I would much rather be shot with a .45 that a .22. That little .22 round will go right through my vest like a knife through butter.
     
  10. cheygriz

    cheygriz Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2002
    Messages:
    2,245
    Location:
    High up in the Rockies
    Uhhhhh...... I wore a vest for many years. First a level 1, and later a level 3A. I've never heard of a .22 penetrating a vest. Any vest.

    (assuming, of course, you're referring to body armor vests!:D )
     
  11. Car Knocker

    Car Knocker Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2002
    Messages:
    3,809
    Location:
    Salt Lake City, UT
    jbleinweber,

    What soft body armor do you have that won't stop a .22LR?
     
  12. mrcpu

    mrcpu Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2006
    Messages:
    372
    I can shoot a spitwad through a piece of tin foil. Is a spitwad, and perhaps the straw that guided it illegal?
     
  13. g5reality

    g5reality member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2007
    Messages:
    379
    YES they must be...At my locel outdoor range we aren't allowed to shoot the handgun metal targets with .223 or any rifle rounds. I'm sure a .308 could go through a couple of car doors.
     
  14. DWARREN123

    DWARREN123 Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2006
    Messages:
    1,749
    Location:
    Between TN & KY
    It depends on where you live and how much knowledge the people who wrote the laws had.
     
  15. Ala Dan

    Ala Dan Member in memoriam

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    12,879
    Location:
    Home Of The First Capitol Of The Confederate State
    The last ones I saw (many moons ago) were made by the Olin corporation,
    a division of Winchester-Western and were marked "Armor Piercing", and
    were of .357 magnum caliber.

    In most cases, these would be illegal; especially for civilians.
     
  16. GRIZ22

    GRIZ22 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2006
    Messages:
    5,035
    [QUOTEThat little .22 round will go right through my vest like a knife through butter.][/QUOTE]

    You have an old vest. Modern vests (last 15 years at least) have been designed to correct this.

    Miamitiger, I think what you are talking about is the old WW (or similar) metal piercing load with the pointy nose. In their time (25-30 years ago), they were the hot stuff available. The ones I have only chrono about 1200 fps from a 4" 357 and their abilty to penetrate compared to modern rounds (AP) is questionable.

    Whether or not they are legal depends on your state law. There are laws governing importation (federal) and use in a crime (usually state) that govern armor piercing ammo.
     
  17. GRIZ22

    GRIZ22 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2006
    Messages:
    5,035
    That's because the rifle rounds, due to velocity, will damage the pistol rated metal targets. They will penetrate or put in deep gouges in the metal.
     
  18. M2 Carbine

    M2 Carbine Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2003
    Messages:
    6,985
    Location:
    Texas
    That has nothing to do with the law. They just don't want their handgun targets shot up.

    I've shot the same pieces of 1/4 steel plate for about 30 years with 45, 9mm, 38, etc, with little damage.

    But even a Kel Tec 9 inch barrel .223 pistol bullet will drill through that same steel like butter. (the rusty hole is AK)

    [​IMG]
     
  19. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    22,324
    Huh, hadn't seen that one.

    The federal law bans handgun armor piercing bullets with a definition of of projectiles made of or cored with one of seven "bad" metals; iron, steel, brass, bronze, beryllium copper, tungsten, and uranium. They later added any bullet with a jacket making up more than 25% of the weight of the slug.

    There are no performance standards, just material of construction. The law was used to halt importation of communist surplus SKS/AK steel core ammunition after Olympic Arms unwisely built a few 7.62x39 "pistols" on AR actions.

    The law has some loopholes but I would rather not pay a lawyer to explain them in court.
     
  20. fattsgalore

    fattsgalore Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2007
    Messages:
    365
    Steel core rifle rounds will punch through about anything. Good luck finding some. I know Dragons breath which turns a shotgun into a flamethrower is illegal, in florida anyway.
     
  21. CWL

    CWL Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2003
    Messages:
    6,505
    FN Five-Seven is a pistol designed to fire AP rounds. You can buy the gun but good luck legally buying the AP rounds. (You can buy civilian legal version non-AP rounds)
     
  22. MachIVshooter

    MachIVshooter Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2005
    Messages:
    14,372
    Location:
    Elbert County, CO
    I can't believe this myth still persists. Just like those darn 5.56mm rounds that tumble through the air when fired from the M-16:rolleyes:

    Simple answer-

    Federal law: For rifles, yes. For handguns, no. State laws may be different.

    Yes, but be careful; it's very easy to start fires with tracers.
     
  23. briansp82593

    briansp82593 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2007
    Messages:
    1,034
    Location:
    Liberty MO
    alot of 5.7 rounds can pierce vests so can 7.62x25 both amazing rounds and really dont need ap rounds to do it
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page