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Are mortars and /or cannons an NFA item?

Discussion in 'NFA Firearms and Accessories' started by bkjeffrey, Mar 14, 2010.

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  1. bkjeffrey

    bkjeffrey Member

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  2. CleverNickname

    CleverNickname Member

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    No, muzzleloading black powder cannon/mortars aren't destructive devices.
     
  3. bkjeffrey

    bkjeffrey Member

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    gotcha, thanks.
     
  4. kingpin008

    kingpin008 Member

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    I'm pretty sure that if the bore is greater than .50" they are.
     
  5. TexasRifleman

    TexasRifleman Moderator Emeritus

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    There are exemptions for some things at the end of 18 u.s.c 921(a)(4):

     
  6. RyanM

    RyanM Member

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    In that definition, "antique" pertains to the ignition source, rather than actual age. If it uses a cannon fuse, friction fuse, matchlock, flintlock, caplock, etc., then it's an "antique." The only black powder muzzleloaders, i.e., "antiques," which would be regulated under the NFA, are machine guns, IIRC. So hooking up an old black powder gatling gun to a steam engine is illegal.
     
  7. TexasRifleman

    TexasRifleman Moderator Emeritus

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    Correct.

     
  8. FuzzyBunny

    FuzzyBunny Member

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    I'm pretty sure all cannons of any size are legal in Texas as long as they are smoothbore.

    I might be wrong as I have not looked at the law on them in years.
     
  9. JShirley

    JShirley Administrator Staff Member

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    It wouldn't matter, because a smoothbore cannon that was not black powder would still be federally regulated.

    Making about half muzzleloading rifles and muskets destructive devices, even when they have an effective range of less than 100 meters. :rolleyes:

    John
     
  10. kingpin008

    kingpin008 Member

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    Ok, ok. So I had it wrong. :uhoh:
     
  11. PTK

    PTK Member

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    Keep in mind for the mortar/cannon to be legal, only designs that were around pre-1898 and reproductions thereof are legal. Example - even if it's percussion/fused/flintlock, a Stokes mortar (the father of the "modern" style) is illegal.

    I know TexasRifleman posted the law saying as such, but putting that in plain language never hurts.
     
  12. JShirley

    JShirley Administrator Staff Member

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    PTK,

    It's my understanding that any black powder design* is legal, no matter when the device was actually designed- see "C".

    *unless the firearm was originally designed to use cartridges, and has just been modified to use BP.
     
  13. RyanM

    RyanM Member

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    My understanding is the same as JShirley's. For instance, in-line rifles, NAA black powder minis, etc.

    Interesting, I never noticed that clause before. That would explain the legality of conversion cylinders for revolvers. And I guess barrel sleeves, too, since that's not "replacing" the barrel.
     
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