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are pre-charged pneumatic's easy?

Discussion in 'Air Guns' started by Kookla, Aug 29, 2016.

  1. Kookla

    Kookla Member

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    Have been thinking about taking the plunge lately- and with something like the Benjamin Maximus. However, one thing I was sure of is the ease of pcp's.

    By that I mean- how easy are they to own? How is the maintenance? How do they seem to hold up in the long run? What tends to go on them quickest?

    I'm used to multipump guns and some spring guns. Both of those types seem to last forever.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Zoogster

    Zoogster Member

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    Going to depend on the gun, but generally they work well.
    They share a lot of the same components that a multipump does except for the pump, only they are made for a higher paying market and so are better quality.
    You fill a reservoir in them and the gun must hold air in that reservoir without leaks, and then release some for each shot when a hammer is allowed to pop open the valve. There is nice triggers and horrible triggers, and the spring that throws the hammer eventually wears.

    In stock configuration they will last a long time. Just like a multipump you can eventually wear out the valve.
    Proper lube and storing it with some pressure so the valve stays seated and doesn't get dust under it helps, just as it does with a multipump.

    What will wear out is the pumps if you pump them long or fast. You have to pump slow and take breaks when it heats up for longevity, or just deal with rebuilding it more often.
    They are moving small volumes of air and take a lot of pumping. It is easy to get into an effective rhythm and put air in the gun fast, but they are not bicycle pumps and can't take that speed for long.
    When you heat up the seals too much you deal with more expansion and subsequent subtraction or get an outright seal breaking eventually.
    At which point you can get new seals and rebuild the pump.
    The only other things getting much abuse in typical designs is the valve. A hammer pops open the valve each shot, and eventually it may not seat right.

    Airguns also are not as durable as firearms. They need to be airtight and are more sensitive to dust. Dust on a valve can lead to a small leak or it not sealing.
    I treat a PCP more delicate than any actual firearm. This means I generally don't consider them ideal for camping, the desert, hiking in the woods, etc Although plenty of people do take them hunting.
    I instead stick to target shooting or pests near a home.
    They cost a lot more than a firearm of similar performance, and cannot take the same abuse.

    Do be aware that powerful ones are loud if not suppressed. People will think you are firing a .22 and police will be called in a neighborhood. Suppressed ones generally still will be heard and sound more like a low powered common bb gun being shot. So you can get away with some shooting.
    But there is still noise and impacts on hard targets will still be loud.

    Many places I have lived outlaw shooting air guns in city limits. How serious of a crime it is depends on the local and state law where you live.
    Some airguns are considered firearms some places, and so could be punished the same as a firearm discharge (felony many places). But generally it is just a local ordinance that makes it a misdemeanor or infraction (still a fine and criminal record).
    So you still cannot go shoot large volumes having fun, but can get away with the occasional shot. Of course it also really makes you even more liable than you already are for each shot, as you are doing something wrong even taking that shot. Most people are unaware of these laws and get away with a bb gun in a backyard. Step it up to something sounding like a .22 and you will get more attention.
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2016
  3. Kookla

    Kookla Member

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    Zoogster- thank you! This was exactly the kind of information I was looking for. Greatly, greatly appreciated!

    Thankfully, I live 5 minutes from the club grounds where I hunt. It's shotgun only- no rifles, but an air rifle would be ok. I was thinking of using it mostly for target shooting and taking out crows in in the fields. These are near-urban farmlands alongside a river that is prone to flooding. It can go from dry and dusty, to sticky river clay/mud/silt that just seems to get on everything (will flood some 2-6 feet at times and the silt will get on the branches and cattails- which then get all over you).

    rethinking this plan now, at least the crow part.
     
  4. RecoilRob

    RecoilRob Member

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    I have a pair of Benjamin Marauders....pistol and rifle, both in .22 and they've held up really well. Over the last 5 years they both hold air for months on end with little to no leakage and will sit with a fully loaded magazine (nothing in chamber) ready for the moment when the rogue groundhog shows itself in the back yard, and neither has ever failed to do the job.

    The Maximus you mentioned is likely built of similar quality materials...which means it 'should' work fine and shoot well for a long, long time. Benjamin has had their teething problems when they first got into the PCP game...but that was long ago and mostly in the past. The Maximus is basically a synthetic stocked Disco and many people really like them.

    Couple things to be aware of: the Disco/Maximus charge only to 2000 psi...vs 3000 for the Marauders. This hurts the potential maximum power available along with the shot count from a fill. The Marauders have adjustable transfer ports where you can fine tune the air discharge to control the power...along with being able to adjust the hammer stroke and spring tension which also affects the power output. If you get things set right, the gun will shoot a 'string' of shots within single digit fps despite the pressure dropping with every shot. The valve is balanced by the tank pressure on the back side, and at first a heavy hammer strike barely can bounce it open...and only for an instant. As the pressure drops, that same hammer strike begins being able to hold the valve open longer and longer...which admits more air to the barrel. So it's kind of self-regulating and very handy for good accuracy over a long shooting string.

    Of course, the more powerful you have it turned up...the less shots per fill you get. No free lunch and all that.:) If a single shot will work for you, the Maximus is a good entry level gun well worth the cost. If you'd enjoy a magazine gun...the Marauders are worth a look...more expensive for sure, but also more powerful and if you're shooting critters it's great to have a follow-up shot available as fast as you can work the bolt without fumbling with hand loading another pill.

    The triggers are all adjustable and can be made VERY nice and easy to shoot. The 3000 psi guns can deliver the heavy .22's (25 grains) up to the high 800's in the rifle for about 34 ft/lbs of energy. The pistol isn't as powerful but not far behind if you open the transfer port up to about .118" and I've taken a bunch of ground hogs with mine with the handy carbine stock (included with the gun) installed. It's easier to sneak around with the shorter/lighter carbine than the full length rifle when the hogs are skittish.:) Good luck with your PCP quest.
     
  5. Kookla

    Kookla Member

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    Thanks everyone, this is all very appreciated.

    I took the plunge:) Cabelas is having a Labor Day sale, 10% off and free shipping. They had the Benjamin Discovery rifle/pump combo on sale for $352- with the 10% off coupon it came to $316 before tax. Got a couple of tins of pellets. Should be here in a couple of weeks.

    I know it's not the Maximus, but at that price, figured it was worth it.

    Figure I'll pull a 4x scope I have off my Marlin and see how it does.
     
  6. LoonWulf

    LoonWulf Member

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    Nice buy. You may want to look into getting a buddy bottle for it, if you have a place localy that will fill it... I have a pair of scotts 4500psi air cylinders that firefighters use (uncle services them), a friend said he could get them fill them at the station, when i get back into pcps. I sold my pcp just because i didnt like pumping it all the time, with the buddy bottle you can shoot it down refill and top off with the pump.
     
  7. a_canadian

    a_canadian Member

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    If you mean that a firefighter could fill your bottles at the station with oxygen - which is after all what firefighters tend to have in their bottles - then please do not do this. A PCP filled with oxygen is a bomb waiting to go off.

    http://www.pyramydair.com/blog/2007/5/please-be-safe/

    Compressed atmospheric air which is mostly nitrogen is safe enough. Oxygen is onenof the most dangerous things with which to fill an airgun. Some are using pure nitrogen, which is also safe. Helium as well. But plain old dry air is the cheapest and is perfectly stable.
     
  8. LoonWulf

    LoonWulf Member

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    The firedepartment here dosent use mixed gas they are straight compressed AIR...if your firedept does use Oxygen then yes bad move putting it in a tank for airgun use.
     
  9. GarySTL

    GarySTL Member

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    My FD also uses straight air. They have a trailer with an engine driven compressor they pull to fires so they can recharge bottle on site.
     
  10. a_canadian

    a_canadian Member

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    I'm sorry guys, guess I'm crossing mental wires, mixing up fire department and medical compressed air sources... it was late, I'd been up too long trying to get a rat that's been up and down the roof and walls for a while. Not much of an excuse but oh well. Good luck on your PCP adventures. For myself I prefer a pump, had an FX pump for about 5 years and all it's needed so far is the odd couple of drops of silicone oil on the main shaft after a bit of a wipe to get rid of old oil. I probably use it a dozen times a month while filling up several PCPs, more if I'm working on tuning a new one and shooting a lot of chrony strings. It's okay exercise, not a big deal.
     
  11. Ohen Cepel

    Ohen Cepel Member

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    I had 2 and ended up selling them. Loud for my setting and I didn't care for the scuba tank sitting around along with the hassle of getting it filled. I prefer to stick to the simpler piston/springers for my needs.

    Now, if you want major league power PCP is the way to go.
     
  12. Kookla

    Kookla Member

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    I've heard they are loud- a few places mentioned a little louder than a sheridan- which I could deal with. Wouldn't be yard shooting, but just down at the club. I have a bunch of indoor friendly air rifles I could use for that itch.

    It should be here in a week or so. Just ordered a Simmons 22 mag 3x9 scope for it- price was too good to pass up.
     
  13. 10point

    10point Member

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    They last i have the woodwalker its awsome airgun
     

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