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Arrrghhh!!! I can't get my MkII back together!!!

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by Dorrin79, Apr 27, 2003.

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  1. Dorrin79

    Dorrin79 Member

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    So I decided to clean my MK II after shooting it with a friend yesterday who commented "Wow, that gun is dirty!"

    Got it stripped, cleaned.

    I can't get the stoopid mainspring back into the back of the grip, such that the bolt can operate. I've managed to get the mainspring in, but then the bolt only comes back a 1/2 inch and wont cycle.

    Does anyone know what I'm doing wrong?!?!? I've reassembled this gun before but I just can't get it this time, and I'm getting really frustrated.
     
  2. larryw

    larryw Member

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    The trick is getting the hammer strut into the recess in the mainspring housing.

    Insert bolt, point muzzle down and pull trigger so hammer falls forward (you may need to use a screwdriver or something to push it forward). Insert mainspring housing and rotate gun so muzzle is down at a 45* angle with the magwell up. Swing housing closed. If it fits flush, the strut missed, do it again. If the housing is sticking above the frame just a bit, lower the latch, you're good to go.
     
  3. Destructo6

    Destructo6 Member

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    You should feel a little resistance right before you close the mainspring assembly into the grip. That's the hammer strut hitting the mainspring. If it closes with no resistance, try it again.

    You still have the Ruger instructions, right? They cover reassembly pretty well.
     
  4. Brad Johnson

    Brad Johnson Member

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    Go to the Ruger website and download the Owner's Manual (if you don't have yours close at hand). Follow the instructions TO THE LETTER. It may take you a couple of times to get the hang of it, but you will eventually be able to disassemble / reassemble your Ruger in only a few seconds.

    Brad
     
  5. Kruzr

    Kruzr Member

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    Better yet, go to yzguy's website and follow the instructions and pictures. The problem you are having is as stated above, you aren't getting the hammer strut into the top of the mainspring. You have to point the muzzle down to get the bolt stop pin in and then you have to point the muzzle straight up when closing the mainspring housing. You have to make sure the hammer strut isn't caught behind the frame pin. It must be hanging down when you swing the MSH up. See this page:

    http://www.1bad69.com/ruger/field_strip.htm
     
  6. jem375

    jem375 Member

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  7. yzguy

    yzguy Member

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  8. Jesse H

    Jesse H Member

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    I've had my 22/45 for about 3 years now. Finally put it back together w/out the instructions for the first time last night since I usually wait so long inbetween cleanings I forget.

    Got it together on the first try too. :p
     
  9. clown714

    clown714 Member

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    been there,done that:neener:

    clown
     
  10. bountyhunter

    bountyhunter member

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    It's a Polish IQ test. I flunked about five or six times. here are words of wisdom: if the bolt stop pin won't go in, point the gun at the ground, pull the trigger and shake it a bit. That usually clears it up. Before you try to "lock in" the mainspring housing, peek in and see where the hammer strut is. If it's stuck forward, reach in with a toothpich and move it back. Then watch it as you rotate the mainspring housing back into the frame and make sure it stays on track. You can do it.
     
  11. AZ Jeff

    AZ Jeff Member

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    I have owned Mark I's, Mark II's and .22/45's over the years, and never had ANY TROUBLE with reassembly with the following tricks:

    1. Install bolt into barrel assembly prior to mating with grip.

    2. Be sure hammer is in the "UP" position PRIOR TO INSTALLING BARREL on grip. The front face of the hammer should be perpendicular to the bore axis when the hammer is up. (Sear friction on hammer will keep it in the up position, provided the trigger is not touched during reassembly.)

    3. Use care to install barrel/bolt assembly, slipping hammer up into recess in bolt without dislodging hammer from vertical postion. This installation process is not as tricky as it sounds.

    4. Once barrel assy. is seated reaward against it's lug on the grip, install the bolt stop pin (part of the mainspring housing assy) into the rear behind the rear sight.

    5. Flip entire pistol UPSIDE DOWN, thus allowing hammer strut to flip out against mainspring housing.

    6. Close and latch mainspring housing as dictated in instructions.

    This has proven for me to be MUCH easier than the complicated instructions provided by Ruger, and has worked on a bunch of pistols equally well.
     
  12. Handy

    Handy Guest

    Not to be contrary, but the only "tricky" part of the assembly is the stuff involving the strut.

    Once you get the bolt barrel and frame together, just play with it, muzzle up and down, and use the trigger to release the hammer forward (no tools or sequencing necessary). The point is to look at where the internals are and what they are doing.

    Once you understand how to guide the hammer and strut into the positions you need, you won't have to remember any steps. Just stick it together and line it all up.
     
  13. AZ Jeff

    AZ Jeff Member

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    Handy, I agree that, once one understands the mechanics of the Ruger rimfire autoloading pistols, it's no big deal to manuver the pistol to get the strut to flop to the right spot so the mainspring housing will close properly.

    That said, there ARE some persons who have trouble visualizing the arrangement of the parts inside the frame, and teaching them a rote memory way of assembling the pistol is one way to avoid the aggravation of assembling this wrong.

    It's sort of like assembly/disassembly of the M1911 pistol. There are lots of ways to do it, but the official Military way is the one that makes it easy for the less mechanically inclined to insure proper function after assembly...........
     
  14. Dorrin79

    Dorrin79 Member

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    thanks all

    yzguy's instructions helped me get it back in working order on my first try
     
  15. alamo

    alamo Member

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    I don't own a Ruger .22 but it sounds like putting them back together can be challenging. I was reading my new issue of "Handguns" today, a company has developed a "Speed Strip Kit" for Ruger .22s.

    It is $49. Might be a good investment for those who shoot a lot and/or have difficulty with reassembly:


    http://www.majesticarms.com/ruger22.html
     
  16. Handy

    Handy Guest

    If you know what you are doing, the "Speed kit" is actually slower, as it requires you to use an allen wrench.

    The kit seperates the bolt stop from the mainspring. So when you strip you pistol, the mainspring is left in place.


    I would have a really hard time spending 25% of the gun's value on a device that prevents you from field stripping without tools, and is unnecessary. They are making their money on the frustration of new MK II owners.


    Alamo, no flame intended. I just don't like that thing.
     
  17. alamo

    alamo Member

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    None taken, just happened to notice it today. That is quite a bit for it.
     
  18. yzguy

    yzguy Member

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    I thought about the kit when I first got mine (after hearing about everyone having problems), but the kit will also keep you from using a few other parts (not compatible), and as was mentioned realy does not help much, if at all. I'm glad I did not get it... (money was better spent on a new hammer, and sear!! :) )
     
  19. jem375

    jem375 Member

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    I just ordered 2 of the speed kits and think they are going to work great........and I would like to see Handy disassemble and assemble the MK2 faster than the kit and the allen wrench.....Ruger made a mountain out of a molehill when they designed the takedown of the MK2........Of course, I will have to put the kit on and try it out, but, it looks like a time saver for cleaning after a day at the range..........
     
  20. Jesse H

    Jesse H Member

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    If everything falls in place on the first try, I wouldn't think doing it the "hard" way would take me longer than 20 seconds.

    Now I'm curious...I'll time myself tonight. :)
     
  21. Handy

    Handy Guest

    Jem,

    With the assistance of a shell casing, I can strip a Mk II in about 5 seconds. After you get the mainspring undone, the gun falls apart. Maybe 20 to put it back together. 22/45s are faster, due to the lower tension on the mainspring body.

    I'm not bragging. Anyone who's done it a several times can do it that fast.

    I think a MkII is easier to assemble than a 1911, for instance.
     
  22. cordex

    cordex Member

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    Handy is right (but I've been using a paper-clip like a sucker). If you're just looking to field strip, the MkII is a cinch and probably easier than most 1911s.
    If you're taking it down to component parts, the 1911 wins by far.
     
  23. Norton

    Norton Member

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    The problem that I had with my new MK II was getting the relationship between the bolt, barrel assembly and frame correct.

    The suggestion of a couple of light taps with a wooden hammer is a good one.

    One thing that has worked for me is to look at the relationship of the "reveal" (don't know what else to call it) between the barrel assembly and the curve where the rear of the barrel assembly meets the frame, before I disassemble. Simply remembering what it's SUPPOSED to look like so that the holes line up has made a world of difference in lowering my stress level when cleaning this firearm.
     
  24. Handy

    Handy Guest

    Earlier today, I made a boast that I could strip a Ruger in 5 seconds, and reassemble in 20. But I did not test myself until now.

    Test gun: Ruger 22/45 with blued 4" bull barrel and factory sights.

    Test chronometer: Seiko Divers 200m Automatic with sweep second hand.

    Test protocol: Looked at watch, performed disassembly/reassembly, looked at watch.

    Test results: I took it apart in 3 seconds. After two practice runs, I put the Ruger back together in 13 seconds. If you add one hour to totally clean the weapon, that's 1 hour, 16 seconds.



    Jem, I'd be happy to teach you the technique for just $98, plus travel expenses.
     
  25. jem375

    jem375 Member

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    yeah, right...........
     
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