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Assume You're Not Confronting a Bear, Mountian Lion, Wolf, or Other N. American Predator ... ?..HG ?

Discussion in 'Handguns: General Discussion' started by Gun Master, Jul 5, 2017.

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  1. Gun Master

    Gun Master Member

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    If you are not confronting any of the above, what predator do you consider the most possible, and what HG would you choose ?

    Don't forget this includes autos and wheelguns.
     
  2. Hardtarget

    Hardtarget Member

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    I'm in mid-Tennessee. We have coyote, bobcat, 'coon and 'possum. There were sightings of cougar last year! I don't see how a .357 would be a bad choice here, but....that's here.

    Mark
     
  3. armoredman

    armoredman Member

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    Human/two legged predators, and any of my CZ 9mm pistols would suffice.
    Coyotes don't generally attack humans, but I would drop one given the opportunity - nasty creatures. Again, any 9mm pistol I own would be up to the job within 50 yards. Past that I wouldn't take the shot.
    Other predators down here tend to be scaly, long, and carry a baby rattle on their rear end. I give them a wide berth, and would only shoot if I absolutely had too, with the difficult target. For those I would recommend the Taurus Judge in .410 with birdshot.
     
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  4. JohnKSa

    JohnKSa Moderator Staff Member

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    I think that dogs are the most likely four-legged attacker in North America.

    I'd use my normal carry gun because that's what I'm going to have on me.
     
    Steve Cover, JR24, Coyote3855 and 8 others like this.
  5. Steve C

    Steve C Member

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    In some areas packs of feral dogs can be a serious danger to humans. Mostly former pets that where abandoned, wild dogs generally have no fear of humans and once feral will consider humans as food. Then there is the problem of rabies that they may carry. Any center fire handgun can dispatch dogs as long as the shooter is a good enough shot to hit a moving target.

    Snakes don't really need to be shot but can easily be killed with rocks or other things available if needed. Wear a good pair of over the ankle leather boots that they can't bite through. If you know where they are simply avoid them.
     
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  6. Deaf Smith

    Deaf Smith Member

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    Ruger GP-100 'Match Champion' .357 magnum with CCI bird shot.

    What critter? Here in Texas it would be SNAKES. Might also add a few 180 gr JHPs for hog but snakes are the main worry.

    Nice thing about a revolver is you can put two snake shots, 4 slugs and then if you need to swap ammo types just cock and de-cock twice and your slugs are ready to fire.

    Deaf
     
  7. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    A .357 Magnum revolver would be and is my choice.
     
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  8. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

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    Use to run into packs of feral dogs while out hunting or hiking. Use to carry my Beretta Model 70S .22 on occasion but decided I needed a little more horsepower and took along my Rossi Model 88. Nowadays I would probably take something like my Ruger SR9c or Kahr CM9 with a couple of spare mags.
     
  9. muzzleblast...

    muzzleblast... Member

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    For a wandering through the hills, dales and woods I always liked the S&W 625 .45 ACP loaded with cast semi-wadcutters. There are lighter options than the N-frame, however.
     
  10. farm23

    farm23 Member

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    Around here rapid coons and coyotes are my worry for my dogs. I use to carry a S&W 3" 44 now I carry a lighter Charter Arms 44. At this point the CA is good out to 80' or so [the distance of my rows], but that should improve with more practice. Before I moved here feral dogs were a problem, but they have not been an issue here. Mostly I carry to eliminate the deer population in my fields.
     
  11. Tirod

    Tirod Member

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    For the most part we carry to protect us from feral humans. That gun will be what we have when the neighbor's pit bull goes beserk.
     
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  12. TN Outlaw

    TN Outlaw Member

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    The predator im most likely to run up on is a beastly creature known as the "X-wife" I get chills just speaking of it.

    Other than her, snakes, yo-T's, and the 2 legged kind.

    A 9mm CZ 75b or G19 will dispatch any of those just fine.

    A 38/357 L frame Smith or Ruger Blackhawk would ensure that i would be prepared come what may(assuming theres not more than 6 critters).

    A G20 with 18 rounds of 10mm gives me the warm and fuzzys but prob more than i would need. I like higher rounds count without having to give up power to get them. This would be my woods gun 8 outa 10 times and a 9/357 alternated every now and then.
     
  13. MedWheeler

    MedWheeler Member

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    The Bug-A-Salt, with granulated NaCl. For mosquitoes.
     
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  14. CraigC
    • Contributing Member

    CraigC Sixgun Nut

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    Feral dogs and meth heads.
     
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  15. Michael Tinker Pearce

    Michael Tinker Pearce Member

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    Humans are far and away the most likely predator where I live, with dogs coming in a distant second. Not feral dogs, mind you; the pets of feral people. Anything I routinely carry will deal with either.

    When I was a cop I was taught a simple rule about dogs: One dog, shoot. Two to three dogs, run. Pack- shoot. If you have one dog shooting them is not a problem. Two or three dogs- if you shoot one the others will get you. Pack- might as well shoot, because you're screwed. If they want you they'll have you. If they aren't sure they want you the gunfire might drive them off.
     
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  16. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

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    Stray dogs with a mean streak or rednecks with a death wish are my biggest worries, as coyotes and lions don't really bother people where I live.

    A S&W 686+ is my answer to both threats, or an HK45 if I'm feeling tacticool that day.
     
  17. Zerodefect

    Zerodefect Member

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    Having too many miles of backpacking under my belt, I've seen every creature short or Grizz and polar bears. 1 stray feral dog, a few ticks, and at least two dozen weird humans were the only trouble I ever ran into. Pretty obvious that humans are the worst thing to run into on a long trail.

    Black bears, panthers (super rare maybe 30 left), mountain lions, even the rattle snakes and cottonmouths I came across were boringly harmless. That being said, black bears are having a few bad years lately. With some dangerous ones making the news.

    The lightest combat sized pistol you have works fine. For me it was a Glock 23. Eco-terrorists are by far the most dangerous thing I ever ran into in the woods. Cults and plain old insane homeless people tied for a close second place.

    A good Surefire E2D Led (400lumens) is a surprisingly effective defensive tool at night. It's darn near impossible to do jack with one of those beaming into your eyes. Use one on a pitbull at night, and you went from a soft target to a UFO.

    Falling, drowning, hypothermia, health failure, crazy people, bad food, reactions to poisonous plants or allergies, then predators, are the worst things (in order) in the backcountry. Predators hardly even make the list in dead last.
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2017
  18. tommy.duncan

    tommy.duncan Member

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    I carry a G20 or a P226 in 357sig when in the woods.
    I am better with the P226 and the bear I might run across aren't that big.
     
  19. Berger.Fan222

    Berger.Fan222 Member

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    One rural county I lived in had more admits in a year for dog attacks than for humans, snakes, coons, and everything else combined.

    Lots of departments also have more shootings of canines than humans most years.

    Having owned powerful dogs, and been in a few scraps with big and little dogs of others, a pistol really is a last resort. A combination of a swift kick and pepper spray is pretty good if your are walking and strong enough and aware enough to get er done in time. On a bike, I've carried a small aluminum wiffle bat dog whacker for several years. Drawing a gun on a canine from a bike is problematic. The bat pulls free from its velcro holder easily and is very ergonomic when biking. One good smack and they never come back.

    Finally, think through how you're gonna shoot a rottie or pit bull or other canine if it is already latched onto you or a loved one. I like a contact POA to the chest with a careful path not to hit anyone on exit. Do not take a head shot on a dog already clamping down. One to the chest and it will let go soon enough.
     
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  20. Hokkmike

    Hokkmike Member

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    I was attacked by a rabid fox which I dispatched with my hunting rifle. My car was assaulted by an equally rabid skunk who chased my wife and I while driving down a dirt road and attempted to spray us. Finally, I observed a racoon meandering about in the middle of the day so I kept my eye on it. For these, anything from a .22 on up would suffice. For larger critters, say a deviant coyote, I would feel better with something bigger. The biggest danger, sadly, comes from our fellow man. My minimum is a .380. (yes, it is big enough)
     
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  21. Armored farmer

    Armored farmer Member

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    20160908_171530.jpg In all my years of outdoor life, both work and play, only twice did I need a gun to defend myself.....both times from dogs.
    Once I had a gun and would have used it if my hunting partner hadn't already shot.
    The other time I was unarmed, we had two boxer dogs decided to attack our horses. They were relentless and ignored our shouts. Finally one of the horses landed a solid kick that sounded like it hit a pumpkin. Game over.

    Any handgun would have worked for me in either situation. I would have been satisfied with my ccw in .380.
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2017
  22. GRIZ22

    GRIZ22 Member

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    A 4" 357 is about the best all around handgun made. Ammo selection according to what power level you think you'll need.
     
  23. Dr.Rob

    Dr.Rob Moderator Staff Member

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    Agreed, a 4 inch .357 is one of the best all around handguns there is. Doesn't matter the size of the 'predator', .357 has plenty of punch.

    Better bullets have made the caliber debate a more level discussion. In an autoloader I'd be happy with a 1911 in .45 or a BHP. in 9mm.
     
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  24. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

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    Dr.Rob

    I agree, 100%!

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    P7kzXHg.jpg

    RpMeXzn.jpg
     
  25. Fiv3r

    Fiv3r Member

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    I think all of us with more than one gun (or if we are needing an excuse to buy something new;)) have played the Bear Game. It doesn't just have to be bears, of course. However we tend to load up to face some sort of calculated threat. It's not foolish at all. It's still very very unlikely. Let me be the first to admit that I am just as guilty as anyone of doing it;)

    If I am hiking an unknown part of our little patch of dirt known as the Midwest, a 3" GP100 in .357 is my go-to. Packs well, shoots well, durable, powerful, etc.

    If I am to do some impromptu sight seeing on a nature trail while on vacation, I'm perfectly fine with a 9mm single stack or even my pocket. 380. Gravel lined tracks don't require that I load for bear...when the nearest bear is 100 miles away;)

    The only animal encounter that has ever startled me enough to start to go for my gun was when we stumbled upon a hungry coyote nipping at the heels of a doe while walking along the lake at my stepdad's cabin in the fall.

    The deer shot past us and I could hear something coming after it, I thought we had spooked them bedding down for the day. The coyote came busting after it.

    It alarmed me enough that I stepped in front of my 5 year old daughter and started to pull my micro .380 from my waistband. It wasn't needed...

    My mother, ever the nature lover and standing an impressive 4'10 and 85lbs simple belted out, "Heyyy! Don't eat my deer!!" :DThe coyote sort of stopped in his tracks, looked at us, and bolted 180. I think we sometimes project our own human malicious tenancy onto nature. Generally, nothing out there in nature that will specifically "get" us for getting us sake. Most critters don't want to mess with the smelly, noisy, crazy apes that bumble through the brush.

    I don't hike off the grid. I don't have the time for it and my daughter is a bit young for something like that. The worst thing I'll run into is a creep. Regardless of what he may be on, if I feel OK packing a .380 in the city then the same bullets will behave the same way out in the boonies. Mama Nature and I get along just fine. I respect her and keep my eyes open. It's our lowest common denominator of humans that I'm not so sure of.
     
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