attempting to reload berdan primers

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by FROGO207, Mar 6, 2021.

  1. FROGO207

    FROGO207 Member

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    I have many berdan primed brass I have saved back. I also have a hydraulic deprimer for it as I used to reload these when I could get the primers. They were corosive so I stopped when I ran out. These days you can get priming compound and along with a punch it looks as though this would be a simpler option than reworking regular primers. I have plenty of 303 Brit, 308, and 7.62X54 brass to reload. So I will try this out over the next month or so. Just need to get some priming compound. If I run through my primer cups it should be easy to get more of them from steel cases before scrapping those.
     
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  2. mokin

    mokin Member

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    I like it. I've got a couple pounds of 7.62x39 brass that is Berdan primed. I've popped a few primers with the idea of reloading. I'd like to try handloading for .303 British as well. I tried a hydraulic method and decided it was a project for the outdoors and summer. Keep us updated please.
     
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  3. mdi

    mdi Member

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    Keep us informed. I don't have many Berdan primed cases and most that I fired were steel cased 5.45x39 and 7.62x39. Some stayed at the range and some went into the trash, but I saved none...

    BTW, I did a little research a few years ago on Berdan priming and I think they would be more efficient, giving better ignition, but much more difficult for reloading. From what I remember the two flash holed gave much better, more efficient ignition for various powder types. At the time I couldn't find any Berdan primers so my researching, potential experimenting stopped...
     
  4. FROGO207

    FROGO207 Member

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    Years ago I purchased Tula primers from PV.
    The base of the deprimer has a hole for the primer to drop and multiple grooves in the bottom to vent the pressure. The punch has a cone/cup (1/2 inch thread protector) part way up it to keep the liquid from squrting up. Use an old 9X9 cake pan to contain the water and a dead blow hammer. A picture when I dig it out of the pile.
     
  5. Blue68f100

    Blue68f100 Member

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    Can you remove the FP hit by putting the base on a flat solid surface first then move to a opening to remove? You would win in not having to mess with the primer cups and a punch. Just a thought.
     
  6. FROGO207

    FROGO207 Member

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    That is what I plan to do. The number of cycles till they fail will be the question to figure out.
     
  7. milsurpguy

    milsurpguy Member

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    Tell you what I'm doing since I love old milsurp junk.
    I was at a show about 10 years ago, a seller had just shy of 3 bricks of berdan primers they were tryingto give away. Gave $20 for the lot, figured I would never use them, more of a backup plan if you will. In case something crazy happened, all the reloading supplies dried up, cheap milsurp ammo vanished, aka 2020.
    I drill out the berdan primer, through the primer anvil, pry out the berdan primer, anneal the neck and shoulder, size, wash, wet pin tumble, then install a berdan primer with a large boxer anvil. Will take a little trial and error to get the primer seat death right.
    That way when I fire them again just size and deprime like normal boxer cases. If it's got a military head stamp and shines like commercial brass, then I know it's berdan boxer hybrid.
    I anneal for longevity as some of the cases split at the neck and shoulder on the first firing.
    I have also had to do this on some boxer primed milsurp brass that had a tiny 1mm flash hole.
     
  8. eb in oregon

    eb in oregon Member

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    For your reading. I tried re-loading 7.62x54R once. It wasn't worth the effort in my opinion. I found this article a few years later. Still not worth the effort in my mind unless in dire circumstances.
     

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  9. Analogkid

    Analogkid Member

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    It can be done. I've done the hydraulic primer removal in m67 7.62x39 brass cases. And then used 5 Super bang brand ring cap disc's soaked in acetone to reload them after punching the dent out. I've done the same with prime all with acetone as well. Just have to let them dry out over night before reloading and firing. Both process work just fine but are corrosive. Which really isnt a issue since I am used to surp corrosive ammo.. I don't do it on a regular basis... But be damned sure I keep my spent m67 and even steel cases if I need to do it on a regular basis.....
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2021
  10. milsurpguy

    milsurpguy Member

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    The cheap milsurp ammo they couldn't move is now scare and costs as much as hunting ammo did 2 years ago if you can find it.
    I would say it's pretty dire.
     
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