1. Bikerdoc's passing and how you can help

    As many of you know, bikerdoc- AKA Al Spiniello- is no longer with us. There are always extra expenses when someone passes. If you would like to contribute to support his family, please do so here: Bikerdoc GoFundMe page.

    (Note - this notice can be dismissed by clicking on the X in the upper right corner.)
    Dismiss Notice

Barrel Break In

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by red rick, Aug 28, 2021.

  1. BobABQ

    BobABQ Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2016
    Messages:
    97
    I have read that some people have some intricate break in procedure and some just clean and shoot.

    I guess I fall into the “clean and shoot camp.” I just don’t see how shoot and clean every round or every few rounds will help. Clean the barrel, run a box of ammo through it and give it good cleaning afterwards.
    Just my $0.02.
     
    Riomouse911 likes this.
  2. loose noose

    loose noose Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2012
    Messages:
    3,445
    Location:
    Southern Nevada
    I whole heartedly agree with BobABQ, in fact the first time I took my Creed Moor out to the range here recently I first cleaned out the barrel of manufacturers oil and gunk really well, and then fired 20 rounds of hand loads, and about a half box of factory ammo, and finally got my zero after about the first 6 rounds at 100 yards. Took it home and gave it a very thorough cleaning and put it up pending deer season.
     
    Zerodefect likes this.
  3. DazedandConfuzed

    DazedandConfuzed Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2016
    Messages:
    91
    Location:
    San Jose, CA.
    I used to work for a custom rifle builder. He sponsored a few competitive shooters, and they would come in yearly for servicing, usually a barrel change. So I asked them what they're break in procedure was...and to a person, it was shoot the hell out of it and clean.
     
  4. Dibbs

    Dibbs Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2018
    Messages:
    1,561
    I hear a lot about barrel break-in.

    Not so much, about keeping your barrel clean, so it doesn't ruin it's accuracy. I would say "Worry less about barrel break-in, and more about regular barrel cleaning."
     
    BobABQ likes this.
  5. ford8nr

    ford8nr Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2011
    Messages:
    1,978
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    What type of competition ? Makes a difference.
     
    taliv likes this.
  6. taliv

    taliv Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2004
    Messages:
    28,336
    Precisely the opposite of this.

    the reason I break in my custom practical precision rifles is so I do not have to worry about regular barrel cleaning.

    regular barrel cleaning isn’t possible for some sports with high round counts. And it changes your velocity until you foul it back in.
     
    red rick and ford8nr like this.
  7. SwampWolf

    SwampWolf Member

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2005
    Messages:
    6,459
    Location:
    North Central Ohio
    Heat and dirt are the two things that will shorten the life of any barrel but especially those chambered with high pressure rounds. Keep them clean and keep them cool; aside from not shooting, there's really little else you can do this side of Voo Doo "break -in" incantations.
     
    Dibbs likes this.
  8. taliv

    taliv Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2004
    Messages:
    28,336
    Dunno about dirt, but if I was making a list I’d say in no particular order:
    Cartridge geometry and how overbore it is
    Flame temp of powder
    Heat from rapid firing
    Barrel surface treatment
    Use of extreme solvents
    Improper cleaning technique especially at muzzle
     
  9. 3% outdoorsman

    3% outdoorsman Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2020
    Messages:
    33
    I break in all my bolt action rifle barrels regardless of cost and definitely see benefit from doing it.barrels are much easier to clean out later on and you learn about that particular barrel far as at what point it shoots best or accuracy falls off but main thing fouling doesn't stick hardly at all and it's much easier to clean out after a range session.
    I do the 2 wet patches, brush ten times with bore brush then dry out, shoot and repeat.
    Fire one clean,fire two then clean fire there and clean and so on.if fouling gets bad you will need to keep round count down between cleaning until fouling isn't sticking as badly.some barrels require more Time and effort than others
     
  10. Lo-Profile

    Lo-Profile Member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2020
    Messages:
    156
    Location:
    Sparks, NV
    I break in mine with initial cleaning.
    Then with 10 rounds, running a lubed patch after each round. Letting the barrel cool between each shot.
    All before I sight in whatever optic I'm going to use.
    That's what Howa recommends for their rifles.
     
    red rick likes this.
  11. sarduy

    sarduy Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2007
    Messages:
    2,936
    Location:
    United States of America
    clean the rifle/bore before range day.

    for bolt action, get 2 to 5 boxes of ammo, zero the rifle and enjoy the day at the range getting used to the recoil and trigger pull. Clean and oil the rifle. Done, rifle is broken in.

    for semiautos, 3 to 4 mags, zero the rifle, enjoy the day at the range, do a mag dump (hard with ammo prices nowadays) clean and oil the rifle. Done.

    I’m a simple guy, if it hits what i aim at after zeroing then it’s good to go.
     
  12. Varminterror

    Varminterror Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2016
    Messages:
    9,756
    I’m with @taliv - cleaning is just an opportunity to induce change in a bore. When barrels are “living,” cleaning means the barrel has to be fouled again with non-competition shots, wasting components and barrel life, and when barrels are “dying,” cleaning typically induces slips in velocity which may not have slipped for 100 more rounds the barrel was left alone.

    When I prioritize making time for break-in, I shoot 1-3 and push out copper and carbon for each until 50 rounds, then push out carbon every 3-5 until 150. Then I start load development, knowing the barrel should be reaching the phase where velocity stabilizes and I can rely on the barrel to shoot the same every round, every hundred rounds, every match. At that point, I only clean every 300-400 rounds. Going past 500 tends to bite me in the ass, so I don’t, and 300-400 coincides well with having shot a little practice, load confirmation, and some permutation of one two day match with extra practice, two one day matches, or a one day and a two day match.

    When I’m foolish and don’t break in an extra barrel in the winter and I’m stuck doing a swap mid-summer, I might end up just blasting 100 rounds of an arbitrary load, cleaning carbon, firing 10 to foul, 25 to develop the load, 10 to confirm zero, 5 to confirm chrony, and go to a match... ain’t ideal, but it’s worked when I’ve painted myself into a corner.
     
    ford8nr likes this.
  13. ford8nr

    ford8nr Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2011
    Messages:
    1,978
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    Once again this thread ended where it always does.
    Camp 1 will follow mfg or barrel makers recommendations and try to ring out the best accuracy and ease of cleaning possible

    Camp 2 are non believers and are OK with whatever accuracy the gun has and are willing to put up with copper fouling. From my 50 years on the range, most were from the hunting persuasion. Today you can add the 'blasters' to the list.
    'Blasters' are the group that wants to do mag dumps whether they hit anything or not or are people happy when the hit paper plates at 50yds.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice